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Why don't or wouldn't you vote? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Why don't/wouldn't you vote?
    I do vote (please state why)
    76
    65.52%
    It doesn't interest me
    6
    5.17%
    I don't care about who wins
    7
    6.03%
    I can't choose - there's more than 1 party I like
    3
    2.59%
    I don't know enough about their policies
    5
    4.31%
    I don't think my vote will make a difference
    20
    17.24%
    I can't be bothered
    11
    9.48%
    Other (please state)
    12
    10.34%

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    If one doesn't vote, do they really have the right to complain about anything they don't like? They made no attempt to get their views represented.
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    If one doesn't vote, do they really have the right to complain about anything they don't like? They made no attempt to get their views represented.
    Of course they're allowed to complain. Not everyone has a particular party they support enough to get behind.

    What if no party represents their views? Voting for a party you don't support simply for the sake of voting is stupid.

    There are lots of other ways to protest and get your views heard, and many see voting as an ineffective way to do that. For example, if I care about environment issues but disagree with other policies of the green party, I probably won't vote but I could get involved in RSPB campaigns instead.
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    (Original post by RFowler)
    Of course they're allowed to complain. Not everyone has a particular party they support enough to get behind.

    What if no party represents their views? Voting for a party you don't support simply for the sake of voting is stupid.

    There are lots of other ways to protest and get your views heard, and many see voting as an ineffective way to do that. For example, if I care about environment issues but disagree with other policies of the green party, I probably won't vote but I could get involved in RSPB campaigns instead.
    Then you vote for the one that best reflects your views, or at least that you fell would least oppose your views, I doubt ANYBODY agrees entirely with any party on every matter.
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    Too many idiots vote and it really narks me to put it lightly.
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    Then you vote for the one that best reflects your views, or at least that you fell would least oppose your views, I doubt ANYBODY agrees entirely with any party on every matter.
    Of course most voters will be compromising, but that isn't always possible if a party you otherwise support has some policies you strongly disagree with.

    The green party have some good environment policies, which I care about. But they also want to give prisoners the vote and also to ban shooting, an activity which I do myself on occasion. So that's a pretty big reason why I can't vote for them.

    Lots of parties claim to want to protect the environment. But this government axed the sustainable development commission, relaxed planning laws and underfunded the woodland grant scheme. And all of the main parties support HS2, which is set to destroy hundreds of sites like ancient woodlands and SSSIs.

    So none of the parties represent me enough for me to vote for them - they don't take the environment seriously. I will still lobby my MP and maybe get involved in campaigns if I have the time, but if I can't find a party to vote for then I'm not going to vote.

    Of course other voters may be in a similar position to me, but on completely different issues to me.
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    'Not informed enough to make a decision' That is such a poor excuse. You have the internet at your fingers, you don't even need to get of your butt. Do some research, its not that difficult.
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    I'll votevote because we constantly complain about how to the government runs things but yet we never take part.
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    Yes, bring governance and power back home. Vote UKIP.
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    UKIP is full of lazy, racist, homophobic, sexist, corrupt scoundrels - just like the LibLabCon parties really.

    But UKIP have no solid or insightful policies that would realistically benefit the majority in future. They are also manipulating the ignorant working classes into thinking EU membership is the cause of all our troubles.

    I hate to say it, but I'm forced to vote for the Green Party unless Ed Milliband gets his act together and starts acting like a potential prime minister.
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    Ditto with SoggyTractor.
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    Long for mans.
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    (Original post by RFowler)
    Of course most voters will be compromising, but that isn't always possible if a party you otherwise support has some policies you strongly disagree with.

    The green party have some good environment policies, which I care about. But they also want to give prisoners the vote and also to ban shooting, an activity which I do myself on occasion. So that's a pretty big reason why I can't vote for them.

    Lots of parties claim to want to protect the environment. But this government axed the sustainable development commission, relaxed planning laws and underfunded the woodland grant scheme. And all of the main parties support HS2, which is set to destroy hundreds of sites like ancient woodlands and SSSIs.

    So none of the parties represent me enough for me to vote for them - they don't take the environment seriously. I will still lobby my MP and maybe get involved in campaigns if I have the time, but if I can't find a party to vote for then I'm not going to vote.

    Of course other voters may be in a similar position to me, but on completely different issues to me.
    Thanks a lot for your reply. Do you think it might be effective if students were made more aware of the smaller parties and encouraged to vote for the party that represented them, in disregard of size? There's nearly 2 million students in UK universities who could make a huge impact on political voting if they were well informed by all parties and the importance of voting, right?
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    (Original post by Brit_Miller)
    Yep, I vote for whoever represents my views best.
    Thanks for your reply. How do you find out who best represents your views?
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    (Original post by NewWithHashtags.)
    Thanks for your reply. How do you find out who best represents your views?
    Read their manifestos, decide from there who you best support and whether there are any deal breakers. Tbh, I wouldn't be surprised if their are sites online that will tell you how you should vote for based upon a quiz, I know that isidewith will give an indication of how well you align with each party.

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    (Original post by NewWithHashtags.)
    Thanks a lot for your reply. Do you think it might be effective if students were made more aware of the smaller parties and encouraged to vote for the party that represented them, in disregard of size? There's nearly 2 million students in UK universities who could make a huge impact on political voting if they were well informed by all parties and the importance of voting, right?
    I don't think awareness is the main problem, it's the voting system. Under first past the post, smaller parties have little chance of getting into parliament. Parties could get to the point of getting 20% of the vote even, but if that's spread evenly they will get zero seats. They need to get their support geographically concentrated in a constituency in order to have a chance of winning the seat. That's why the green party has 1 MP even though it polls a bit lower than UKIP, which has no MPs.

    A proportional voting system like the one used in the European elections would help, as it would eliminate tactical voting and smaller parties have a chance if they manage to get at least 9-10% of the vote. I'd like that in an ideal world but I don't know how it could be implemented effectively. At the very least there should be a public debate about it.

    Awareness isn't the main problem, but it is an issue. If more people knew the European elections were proportional, I suspect turnout at those elections would be a lot higher and more people would use it to register a protest.
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    (Original post by NewWithHashtags.)
    Thanks for your reply. How do you find out who best represents your views?
    Looking at policies.
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    Everyone should vote. No vote is a wasted vote (in both senses). Simple as that.
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    (Original post by xDave-)
    Frankly, I don't know enough about the majority of the policies to be able to say one party is better than another. Parties stand for so many things that it would take me forever to research each individual issue, formulate an opinion, and then review what each party stands for in terms of that one issue. I'd have to do that hundreds of times to actually know anything, I would imagine. I can't imagine many other people are doing that, so what are we actually voting for? Simple: the majority of people vote based on not wanting party x to win, thus having to vote for party y. Chances are, that'll be based on fewer than a handful of their policies, or perhaps just because one of the leaders "looks like a ****". You want me to vote in a system like that? Yeah, no thanks.

    I would vote if we voted on individual issues, as then I wouldn't have to worry about the rest of the things. This would get people thinking about the issue at hand, and voting for that reason, hopefully. I would vote in the current system if one issue alone was compelling enough to vote on.
    I know I'm more likely to vote if this was what happens, but that does sound expensive and time-consuming. And we'd probably need to do that regularly to fit in a vote for every policy. Which would reduce participation.
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    (Original post by subject_delta)
    Everyone should vote. No vote is a wasted vote (in both senses). Simple as that.
    Just calling it simple doesn't make it simple. Tell us why you think it's simple, so we can all learn!
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    (Original post by Pride)
    Just calling it simple doesn't make it simple. Tell us why you think it's simple, so we can all learn!
    This statement I made has two meanings; I'll deconstruct both.

    Firstly, it can mean that "not voting is wasting a vote". This is true because under the current system, every British citizen (and maybe EU ones resident here, I'm not exactly sure) is granted a vote in the general election. It's the one chance every 5 years that you can directly influence the way the country is run. Not voting is wasting that opportunity and the it means that the general opinion of the people is not represented in government and the way the country is run. It directly undermines the system people have worked for for hundreds of years.

    The alternative meaning is that "there is no such thing as a wasted vote". If everyone who said "I'm not gonna vote for <party>; they'll never get in!" voted for that party, what do think could happen? Even if your party doesn't get in, it's a way of telling everyone what you support and how you would like the system to be. This is evident in light of the recent surge of favour for UKIP -- the current government actively changed their policy to appease these voters. If your party does get in, it means you helped shape the way your country is run. Hell, even if you vote for a joke party or small local-interest party it shows there is support there and shows that you are disillusioned with the system.

    If you don't vote because you are disillusioned then you are very likely to be lumped in with the apathetic people who just don't care.


    Hopefully this helped.
 
 
 
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