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Why are replica footy shirts so damn expensive? Watch

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    (Original post by Isambard Kingdom Brunel)
    You still haven't explained the difference between stadium shirts and player shirts, apart from price.

    Would a Messi player shirt fit me like it fits on Messi? I have moobs and a beer gut, does that rule me out? How are you supposed to know if Messi's shirt will fit you?
    I don't know what you mean by 'still', you didn't ask. It depends on the manufacturer and when the shirt was made.

    For example.

    Nike manufactured player issue shirts from around 2008 were mostly just a slimmer fit and had the wash instructions printed on the inside instead of on a label that hangs out. The purpose was to prevent friction between the shirt and player's body. Few other differences like no DriFit logo but other than that not much. They weren't commercially available at this time though, the only way to get one was from the kit room. I've got two Villa ones of the same kit (replica and player issue) so could post pics of the differences.

    Adidas player issue shirts (and recently, some of the Nike ones) have the crest, three stripes and Adidas logo applied by heat transfer, i.e. it's not stitched on. The idea is that it reduces the weight of the shirt but obviously this is minimal.

    Around 2012, Nike started to introduce more gimmicks into their player issue shirts, for example rubber T strips on the shoulders which the replicas do not have, and ventilation panels down the sides which help lower body temperature (apparently). Like I say, it's all a gimmick. I'm assuming they did this with the intention of retailing both versions.

    There can be other differences such as material used for the underarm used for the entire back of the shirt to cool body temperature but not many shirts have this.

    The one universal trait in the player issue shirts is a tighter fit. The only difference between the 'stadium' and 'match' shirts is a tighter fit, ventilation holes and rubber T strips. It's not worth the money imo.
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    (Original post by Stinkum)
    Fair enough, that's your opinion. I disagree. I quite like wearing football shirts with names on the back. They look nice, and especially during the World Cup for example, I was wearing my Holland and Brazil shirts quite a lot, and I wear my Real Madrid shirt during the champions league season. I don't think it's a big deal really. I don't wear them 24/7.

    And now I NEED a number 11 Klose Germany shirt. World cup winner, all time top scorer at the World Cup, and a player that I've enjoyed watching throughout the years. It's an absolutely must-have shirt!!
    For me, it's sportswear that hasn't successfully crossed the boundary over into casual fashion, as the polo shirt and retro trainers have, for example. Classic tennis wear has always been far more stylish than football wear.

    For kids, it's two-fold. First, in an aspirational sense, they look up to the players and want to play for their team. Two years ago if you'd have asked a 10 year old Spurs fan who his favourite player was, he'd have said Bale. Spurs (and other) fans with longer memories respect the effort and determination of the less skilled players: Steffen Freund being one who has made it into the club's hall of fame despite not being very gifted. Adults empathise and recognise they won't play for their team, ergo no reason to wear the replica kit. Second, in a fashion sense, adults are expected to have developed an understanding of the difference between sportswear and casual wear.

    Also in my older years I've become rather ideologically opposed to them as they're a symbol of the cash cow football has become. Having them expire every season is ridiculous.
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    I've noticed on the shirts that the footballers wear, they have something on the shoulders, it's like two pieces of tape stuck together in the middle, what's that for?

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    (Original post by ZSHNZ)
    I've noticed on the shirts that the footballers wear, they have something on the shoulders, it's like two pieces of tape stuck together in the middle, what's that for?
    Around 2012, Nike started to introduce more gimmicks into their player issue shirts, for example rubber T strips on the shoulders which the replicas do not have
    http://wallimgs.com/wp-content/uploa...yne-Rooney.jpg

    I think I saw Nike claim it was to improve balance. How it improves balance I do not know. More likely they wanted to add subtle differences between the player issue and replicas so they could eventually charge £90 for them. If there was literally no difference everyone would just get the replica.
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    (Original post by rockrunride)
    A fashion plea: if you are over the age of 15, please do not don a replica or player issue football shirt unless you are playing football.
    Seconded but I'd add are at a game of that team in the stadium to the exceptions list
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    (Original post by Wattsy)
    Seconded but I'd add are at a game of that team in the stadium to the exceptions list
    I wouldn't. For me, acceptable insignia is a pin badge or scarf if it's a big cup game.
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    (Original post by rockrunride)
    I wouldn't. For me, acceptable insignia is a pin badge or scarf if it's a big cup game.
    But you're a fashion mod, you hold yourself to a higher standard of acceptability than most of the rabble.

    The NFL at Wembley for example would lose lots of its charm without being able to see shirts from all 32 teams in the league represented. A football crowd looks far more impressive as a wall of block colour than as some kind of myriad of boring winter clothing.
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    (Original post by Wattsy)
    But you're a fashion mod, you hold yourself to a higher standard of acceptability than most of the rabble.
    I'm not a fashion mod and wouldn't wear one at a game. For a start it's cold in England so you'd end up wearing it stretched over a hoody which is one of the silliest looks in the stands.

    The NFL at Wembley for example would lose lots of its charm without being able to see shirts from all 32 teams in the league represented.
    We can't use Americans as a yardstick for what looks good at English football matches. Those lot wear big sponge hands, face paint and take signs in saying 'hi mom!' .

    A football crowd looks far more impressive as a wall of block colour than as some kind of myriad of boring winter clothing.
    I think it looks far more intimidating if everyone is dressed in dark colours but that's just me.
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    (Original post by Wilfred Little)
    I'm not a fashion mod and wouldn't wear one at a game. For a start it's cold in England so you'd end up wearing it stretched over a hoody which is one of the silliest looks in the stands.



    We can't use Americans as a yardstick for what looks good at English football matches. Those lot wear big sponge hands, face paint and take signs in saying 'hi mom!' .



    I think it looks far more intimidating if everyone is dressed in dark colours but that's just me.

    I can't deny the hoody look, it's ridiculous. Man up or get out as far as I'm concerned on that one. The Toon Army battle the cold all winter without complaint so I think the rest of the league should aspire to that level of cold resistance/stupidity
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    Just a note that if anyone actually wanted a football shirt in that wasn't from a particular team and it's pretty much identicle in material and construct (looser shape though) to the pro shirts; but I doubt the companies would ever tell you that .

    Personally people who were football shirts casually especially ones with other players names on are absolute goons
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    Why don't you make the shirt? It will cost very little to dye the shirt. And then paint whatever you want on it
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    (Original post by anonymouspie227)
    Why don't you make the shirt? It will cost very little to dye the shirt. And then paint whatever you want on it
    No

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    But it would be so rewarding
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    Tell me about it, the new Arsenal shirt is around £50 without a name on the back
 
 
 
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