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Best Academic Route? BSc, MPhil, PhD etc Watch

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    I want to get a PhD because my surname begins with D and then it would be alliteration . . .

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    Basically you start with a Bachelor of Science honours (BSc Hons) degree after school. This is 3 years in English universities and 4 years in Scottish. You'll finish with a certain classification, a first (like an A average), a 2:1 (B average), a 2:2 (C average) or a third (D average).

    To be considered for a phd at any point you really need a first or 2:1. We were warned in final year that doing a masters will never cover the fact that you got a 2:2. It's possible to do a phd with a 2:2 BSc Hons but everything is made 10x more difficult. Competition with better people etc.

    If it's possible to do an undergraduate masters (MSci) which is 4 years in England and 5 in Scotland then do that as it often provides a year in industry or research. If this fails then do a postgrad masters in research (MRes). DO NOT waste time with a postgrad MSc as the lab based component is tiny compared to that of MRes or undergrad MSci. The MSc are not really suited for those wanting a phd.

    It's often possible to skip masters and go straight from BSc Hons to PhD, which is what me and most of my friends are doing. Or we're doing 4 year phd programmes which include a masters-like first year. This will save you a lot of money, obviously not having to fund a masters.

    I'd also recommend slowing down a bit! You're attempting to enter a long road, entering academia is difficult and jobs are scarce. If you're planning to become a lecturer type professor at a university/research institute, not only do you need to complete a 3-4 year BSc, possibly a 1 year masters, and a 3.5 year phd, but you then need to complete usually a minimum of two post doctoral positions, which take around 3-4 years each. At this point you may start to see employment opportunities as a researcher/lecturer at a university. Or you may not.

    At this point you're Dr. Whatever of Whatever university. The road lengthens when heading for professorship. A week ago the head of my course was awarded professorship after years of dedicated research and teaching, at age 53(?). He is now Prof. rather than Dr.

    It's a long road that will most likely take up the rest of your life and career! I'm still reasonably near the beginning of it myself, good luck!




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    (Original post by LSD)
    Basically you start with a Bachelor of Science honours (BSc Hons) degree after school. This is 3 years in English universities and 4 years in Scottish. You'll finish with a certain classification, a first (like an A average), a 2:1 (B average), a 2:2 (C average) or a third (D average).

    To be considered for a phd at any point you really need a first or 2:1. We were warned in final year that doing a masters will never cover the fact that you got a 2:2. It's possible to do a phd with a 2:2 BSc Hons but everything is made 10x more difficult. Competition with better people etc.

    If it's possible to do an undergraduate masters (MSci) which is 4 years in England and 5 in Scotland then do that as it often provides a year in industry or research. If this fails then do a postgrad masters in research (MRes). DO NOT waste time with a postgrad MSc as the lab based component is tiny compared to that of MRes or undergrad MSci. The MSc are not really suited for those wanting a phd.

    It's often possible to skip masters and go straight from BSc Hons to PhD, which is what me and most of my friends are doing. Or we're doing 4 year phd programmes which include a masters-like first year. This will save you a lot of money, obviously not having to fund a masters.

    I'd also recommend slowing down a bit! You're attempting to enter a long road, entering academia is difficult and jobs are scarce. If you're planning to become a lecturer type professor at a university/research institute, not only do you need to complete a 3-4 year BSc, possibly a 1 year masters, and a 3.5 year phd, but you then need to complete usually a minimum of two post doctoral positions, which take around 3-4 years each. At this point you may start to see employment opportunities as a researcher/lecturer at a university. Or you may not.

    At this point you're Dr. Whatever of Whatever university. The road lengthens when heading for professorship. A week ago the head of my course was awarded professorship after years of dedicated research and teaching, at age 53(?). He is now Prof. rather than Dr.

    It's a long road that will most likely take up the rest of your life and career! I'm still reasonably near the beginning of it myself, good luck!




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    Okay, thank you very much! And good luck yourself
 
 
 
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