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criticise my physique. Watch

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    the abdomen is lacking, no packs there, and to add a bit more size.
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    (Original post by karmacrunch)
    Oh okay! Don't worry then. You've done well though
    No please explain, I am a little slow sometimes aha, Thank you btw
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    (Original post by slade p)
    the abdomen is lacking, no packs there, and to add a bit more size.
    I have fat covering them, it's really stubborn fat that is really hard to lose
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    (Original post by jay2013)
    Yes basically!
    I can do science me.
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    (Original post by MattyR2895)
    Firstly, I don't really care about your qualifications.
    Second, no offence to the op, but the dude looks like he could eat 4000 and still not gain weight. That's why I told him to keep track of his weight. However many calories he needs to gain weight, it's probably going to be a lot.
    'He should be aiming for 1.5 to 2 grams of protein per kg of body weight'. Op says he weighs 71kg, that makes his protein requirements at least 107g. I highly doubt even a vegetarian would have trouble getting that provided they were eating even just 3000kcals a day, without counting calories. Hell, even plain pasta has 13g on protein per 100g, throw some chicken in with that and a glass of whole milk and he's pretty much there in just one meal.
    As for your comment about fact, when I said just focus on calories, I did so assuming the op has the ability to use common sense. obviously don't condone him using kfc to get his calories everyday.
    Cliffs:
    you're over complicating it. Tracking calories will suffice for someone in op's position.
    1. You might not care about my qualifications, but I've studied the science behind nutrition so I'm in a better position to give advice to the OP.

    2. That's at the lower end. The OP will need to see if it that's sufficient. If not, then he can increase it.

    Also why are you still talking about calories?

    To the OP:

    1. Obviously drink enough water. Drink according to your urine - if it's dark, drink more. If light, maintain your level of water.
    2. Get a good night sleep.
    3. Keep at it, but make sure you progress in your workout. It takes time to build your body.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I have fat covering them, it's really stubborn fat that is really hard to lose
    Do you do IT?
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    get some biceps
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    In addition to what has been said previously, skinny chicken arms aren't a hot look. Proportion is key - a big ol' chest with pepperoni nipples is no good with arms like that.
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    (Original post by karmacrunch)
    Your welcome! If you must, basically...

    Thingy said "sock stuffed in boxers"

    Then I meant to say "I only just go that (what he meant)... yeesh"

    I said 'yeesh' because I was wondering why he was looking!

    That is it. I should really check after I type... I hope you didn't think I meant anything bad/rude!


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    Oh right, that makes sense, noo nnooo offence taken


    (Original post by jay2013)
    Do you do IT?
    No I don't, would that help?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Oh right, that makes sense, noo nnooo offence taken

    No I don't, would that help?
    Hmm I don't think in your case it would. I was only asking because that could explain your high metabolism.

    Just keep doing some aerobic exercise (i.e. cardio), running if you can. Also when you're doing the cardio don't eat anything before hand, exercise on a empty stomach if you can. If you eat something (which will no doubt include some carbs) then your body will release insulin in response to the increase in blood glucose. And insulin slows down fat oxidation.
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    (Original post by jay2013)
    1. You might not care about my qualifications, but I've studied the science behind nutrition so I'm in a better position to give advice to the OP.

    2. That's at the lower end. The OP will need to see if it that's sufficient. If not, then he can increase it.

    Also why are you still talking about calories?

    To the OP:

    1. Obviously drink enough water. Drink according to your urine - if it's dark, drink more. If light, maintain your level of water.
    2. Get a good night sleep.
    3. Keep at it, but make sure you progress in your workout. It takes time to build your body.
    Wow, way to completely ignore what I said. Why am I still talking about calories? Because that's what it comes down to, and you said that op should ignore calories. You're making it needlessly overcomplicated for someone who clearly doesn't understand much working out and nutrition, hence this thread. If he is getting his calories, and using common sense by eating even a somewhat balanced diet, ie eating meat, getting his micros, mostly unsaturated fats and filling the rest of his calories with carbs, his macros will be sufficient to build muscle.
    Also, if you've studied so much and you're so sure just tracking macros is the way to go, maybe you could have provided an obvious novice with more info than 'Forgot about calories and start eating according to macronutrients requirements!.
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    (Original post by jay2013)
    Hmm no. I've studied sport science at university and I'm about to study my Masters in Sport Science as well.

    Here's a little summary for you and the OP. Calorie is just a measurement of how much energy is required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water by 1 degree Celsius. However this can be applied to the macronutrients.

    1 gram of protein is roughly 4 calories.
    1 gram of carbohydrate is roughly 4 calories.
    1 gram of fat is roughly 9 calories.

    I said the OP needed to concentrate on macronutrients because he could be eating 3,000 calories a day but most of that could be fat.

    If the OP is lifting then he should be aiming for 1.5 to 2 grams of protein per kg of body weight if he isn't already.
    calorie: 1 gram of water by 1 degree Celsius
    Calorie: 1 kilogram of water by 1 degree Celsius

    Also you don't want to be ignoring calorie numbers. The way I calculate macro-nutrients usually is by taking 1g per lb of body weight for protein, picking a ratio for fats such as 0.45/0.5g per lb of body weight, and I fill the rest in with carbs.

    To be able to fill in the carbs, I need to know what calorie number I want to hit
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    (Original post by jay2013)
    If the OP is lifting then he should be aiming for 1.5 to 2 grams of protein per kg of body weight if he isn't already.
    thats way too much lol

    even people with aswome physiques don't have that much protein
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    (Original post by a10)
    thats way too much lol

    even people with aswome physiques don't have that much protein
    He said per kg not per lb.
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    (Original post by a10)
    thats way too much lol

    even people with aswome physiques don't have that much protein
    Yep, I agree. I think that guy must have done most of his degree research on the misc section of bodybuilding.com. lol
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    (Original post by 'Ello Dave!)
    He said per kg not per lb.
    hmm still a lot..
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    (Original post by a10)
    hmm still a lot..
    No it's not at all. If anything it's less than what most people recommend.
    I'd go for 2.2g per kg of body weight.
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    (Original post by 'Ello Dave!)
    calorie: 1 gram of water by 1 degree Celsius
    Calorie: 1 kilogram of water by 1 degree Celsius


    Also you don't want to be ignoring calorie numbers. They way we calculate macro-nutrients usually is by taking 1g per lb of bodyweight for protein, picking a ratio for fats such as 0.45/0.5 per lb of bodyweight, and we fill the rest in with carbs.

    To be able to fill in the carbs, we need to know what calorie number we want to hit
    Yes but I used the grams when trying to explain how calories are used for macronutrients.

    I've never used lb, only kg. It's fairly similar though from some quick calculations, just a little less. But you don't "fill in" with carbs! Your activity level is much more important when calculating carbs intake.

    (Original post by a10)
    thats way too much lol

    even people with aswome physiques don't have that much protein
    No, if you're trying to increase muscle mass you need a higher amount of protein than average.
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    (Original post by 'Ello Dave!)
    He said per kg not per lb.
    I would still argue that's quite a lot for someone of Op's size. 2x71 is 142. That might not seem like much in the bodybuilding world, but in reality, that is much more than is necessary for muscle growth in someone of his size
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    (Original post by MattyR2895)
    Yep, I agree. I think that guy must have done most of his degree research on the misc section of bodybuilding.com. lol
    ROFL! :lol:
 
 
 
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