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    Most jobs taken by graduates are not graduate scheme jobs, and once you get your first job nobody will give a **** about your degree.
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    (Original post by donutaud15)
    A lot of people in my class had very good A levels. What a lot of people don't seem to understand is sometimes people choose to go to a certain uni despite its rankings because they simply just want to. Not because they're too dumb or whatever. It's a stupid mentality and it's high time people get over their superiority complex. So bloody what if they have 400 UCAS points? If they have a 2.2 it still means **** all, unless they can prove mitigating circumstances to potential employers. Hell in ten years A levels wouldn't even matter when applying for a job.





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    They said the same thing 10 years ago, A-Levels are still the benchmark, most employers turn too! Before that it was O-levels, so the fact is they aren't going anywhere and its becoming ever so important to have a decent set as so many employers won't touch you with out a good set.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    I got a C in AL IT, but a 2.1 in CS.

    Are you trying to tell me that AL IT is harder than a CS degree?
    Well with economics, your little brother got C's and is likely to get a 2:1 from birmingham city university. I would perhaps say so, most places specify an A-level requirement to even be considered. Just the simple fact he hasn't got a decent set, he can't fulfil his dreams of working for the chancellor of the exchequer. Economic is not a doss, but from "BCU" it is.
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    It is true though how can a course accepting grades of A*AA not have like a 99% 1st rate and you can say the opposite for courses accepting low amounts of UCAS points for 2 A Levels(how can it have anything above 1% 1st rate)-there is some possibility for outliers students who really struggle at university/don't do the work despite being clever and vice versa which shouldn't account for more than 1%.

    The fact that generally grades are reasonably consistent between universities and there aren't massive pass rates at the best unis and massive fail rates at the worst universities, despite their being a massive difference in the ability of the students admitted to their courses shows that their course can't be close to the same difficulty-I don't think there is any real room for argument.The fact that some employers don't do their research and can't grasp basic logic is worrying.
    I got CDE at A-Levels and go to an ex-poly, and yet here I am, working at a brilliant company doing a brilliant job with brilliant people and learning a metric ****-tonne about an entire industry - and the best part is that I am yet to use anything I learned in my physics or maths A-Levels! :rolleyes:

    A-Levels are merely a means of getting a degree, and getting a degree is merely a means of showing you have at least some form of passion for the jobs you're applying for.
    After that, once you've got some experience, your degree is virtually meaningless (and in fact mine is already meaningless and I haven't even finished the darn thing yet).
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    Get over it and just apply elsewhere.

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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    I got a C in AL IT, but a 2.1 in CS.

    Are you trying to tell me that AL IT is harder than a CS degree?
    A 2:1 is about the average grade for degree and a C is just below average at A-Level so it seems reasonable presuming you went to an average university.There are always outliers/anomalies as students transition between A-Levels and University explaining those students who easily passed A-Level yet failed University but not to the extent of the large number that don't get a 1st at top universities despite getting near perfect grades anomalies can't fully account for it and top universities are starting to ask for A Level UMS, which as previously posted is strongly correlated to degree performance.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Well with economics, your little brother got C's and is likely to get a 2:1 from birmingham city university. I would perhaps say so, most places specify an A-level requirement to even be considered. Just the simple fact he hasn't got a decent set, he can't fulfil his dreams of working for the chancellor of the exchequer. Economic is not a doss, but from "BCU" it is.
    No. I got a C due to bad exam technique, poor exam prep (my al teacher didn't make us do tonnes of past papers) and mitigating circumstances.

    I simply underperformed. I had got an A at GCSE IT.

    If you think learning how to use PowerPoint/Microsoft office suite is more challenging then writing software. You are seriously deluded.

    At uni, things changed. My department was excellent at drilling students to grasp and pass exams.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    They said the same thing 10 years ago, A-Levels are still the benchmark, most employers turn too! Before that it was O-levels, so the fact is they aren't going anywhere and its becoming ever so important to have a decent set as so many employers won't touch you with out a good set.
    Yeah, a **** bench mark.

    The fact that you were able to get good ALs after several resits goes to show that it is more about how you are taught and exam technique rather then innate intelligence. And the odds of achieving the best grades are biased towards those that have access to the best teaching - I.e money.

    Plus what you do for ALs often has no relevance to the job you want. Using AL IT as an example, it is too basic for the work I do. My degree is much more relevant.
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    A 2:1 is about the average grade for degree and a C is just below average at A-Level so it seems reasonable presuming you went to an average university.There are always outliers/anomalies as students transition between A-Levels and University explaining those students who easily passed A-Level yet failed University but not to the extent of the large number that don't get a 1st at top universities despite getting near perfect grades anomalies can't fully account for it and top universities are starting to ask for A Level UMS, which as previously posted is strongly correlated to degree performance.
    What easily accounts for the difference is that the way you think at university and the way you think at A level are completely different. A levels teach you to regurgitate facts, Universities teach you how to think, thus it is expected that A levels are a lot easier and that it isn't necessarily true that somebody who does well at A level will do well at university. And this isn't even on topic.

    On topic, however, the numbers of people getting 3rd class degrees and 2.2s is getting lower and lower, 2.1 requirement is perfectly reasonable.
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    The students at lower ranked universities got lower grades at A-Level on average compared to the higher ranked ones so are dumber so its not that strange to me that they found it hard.""If you try to compare someone's A-level grades with their degree outcomes you get pretty poor correlation. But if you compare A-level UMS (uniform mark scheme) marks with degree outcomes you get very good correlation." so its important to take into account marks but at the top universities marks are discriminated against and they only give out offers to people with good UMS so they are cleverer.Source:http://www.tes.co.uk/article.aspx?storycode=6065632
    So so wrong. I CHOSE a lower ranked uni even though I had offers from RG's because I didn't like them, second I didn't revise once for my A-levels so underperformed in relation to what I could have achieved even though my grades were still good enough for acceptance into so called higher ranked unis. Achieving lower grades didn't mean I was less intelligent it meant I was lazy and still am just finished my first year with a 1st did I revise? No no I did not so since OP got a 2:2 does that make him less intelligent than me? No it probably makes him lazy.
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    A 2:1 is about the average grade for degree and a C is just below average at A-Level so it seems reasonable presuming you went to an average university.There are always outliers/anomalies as students transition between A-Levels and University explaining those students who easily passed A-Level yet failed University but not to the extent of the large number that don't get a 1st at top universities despite getting near perfect grades anomalies can't fully account for it and top universities are starting to ask for A Level UMS, which as previously posted is strongly correlated to degree performance.
    Not everyone gets 2.1 though. The OP didn't get it did he? Same with my course, many didn't. CS isn't a walk in the park mate.

    In STEM subjects, you will find that getting a 2.1 is harder because the drop out rate is higher.

    Yes I didn't go to a top 10 uni, but there is actually nothing stopping me from doing a masters at one if I really wanted too. And here is the thing if I did do one, and got a good mark , I will still be barred from some grad schemes due to ALs.

    Finally you are discounting things that can impact AL marks, quality of teaching, mitigating circumstances etc I went from an A grader to a C grader at AL in IT. How did that happen?
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    Yeah, a **** bench mark.

    The fact that you were able to get good ALs after several resits goes to show that it is more about how you are taught and exam technique rather then innate intelligence. And the odds of achieving the best grades are biased towards those that have access to the best teaching - I.e money.

    Plus what you do for ALs often has no relevance to the job you want. Using AL IT as an example, it is too basic for the work I do. My degree is much more relevant.
    Not at all I spent most my days at school getting kicked out,lol. It shows im willing to use physical intervention to get what i want. Not scared of conflict or a bit of violence. Getting a good A-Level IT grade will get you on a decent A-Level scheme with an IT company and a reasonable salary with a degree in 5 years in computer science guaranteed.
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    (Original post by juiceboxy)
    I'm looking through graduate roles and a bunch of them require a 2.1 and wont even let you apply without one. What makes this so bad is that they often don't specify what you need a 2.1 in, just any degree.

    I got a 2.2 in MORSE at Warwick. I looked at a graduate role for Fujitsu- 2.1 degree and 240 UCAS points from 3 A-Levels. I have 400 UCAS points from 3 A-Levels.

    Why is the system so broken? I'm not going to pretend like I performed well at Uni, but don't mock me with these ridiculously low A-Level requirements and then say 2.1 in ANYTHING.
    Your degree is more important than your a level grades. For big companies the standard of degree would allow you to apply but getting a 2.1 in media from Leeds metropolitan wouldn't even be looked at by a big company. To some extent I would agree companies should change their system; they should drop the a level requirement, make you specify which uni you went to and the subject you studied


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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    Not everyone gets 2.1 though. The OP didn't get it did he? Same with my course, many didn't. CS isn't a walk in the park mate.

    In STEM subjects, you will find that getting a 2.1 is harder because the drop out rate is higher.

    Yes I didn't go to a top 10 uni, but there is actually nothing stopping me from doing a masters at one if I really wanted too. And here is the thing if I did do one, and got a good mark , I will still be barred from some grad schemes due to ALs.
    Depends the higher up you get the less they would look at A-Levels and more specialist you become. At the same time when you get to a certain age you don't need grad scheme. But at the same time people frown upon companies they have never heard of, because the likelihood the person employing you isn't even a specialist in that industry, just a paper pusher.
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    (Original post by a10)
    You should understand that A-levels are not really representative of someone's ability, many people flop A-levels for various reasons and do well at university and similarly lots of people pass with aswome grades at A-level but do crap at university.

    Also "best" and "worst" are subjective, it depends on a number of factors as to what you're rating them for. Just because someone in a "low" ranked university gets a 2:1 or a first doesn't mean they aren't competent for a job compared to a so called RG graduate who studied the same course. Employers have many barriers in which they test the competency of a candidate such as 2 or so interviews or online tests in order to single out the best candidates for the job.

    I find your level of snobbery disgusting, perhaps you will realise how stupid that ideology is once you're at university and start applying for jobs yourself. It's not just about education.
    Don't you think they need to standardise the degree system somewhat though? When their is a 2:1 cut off on a job it IS unfair because every uni has a different standard at a 2:1. Since uni's exams are externally marked many markers have noted that, let's say, Oxford's content is more challenging and rigorous than a different uni so a 2:1 is likely (but not always) makes the Oxford 2:1 graduate 'smarter' in that subject than the other 2:1 grad in the same subject.


    Correct me if I'm wrong because I don't know a lot about the system and how classification works exactly.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Not at all I spent most my days at school getting kicked out,lol. It shows im willing to use physical intervention to get what i want. Not scared of conflict or a bit of violence. Getting a good A-Level IT grade will get you on a decent A-Level scheme with an IT company and a reasonable salary with a degree in 5 years in computer science guaranteed.
    I have nothing to prove by retaking AL IT. It is a waste of time.

    I am working as a IT professional, you might not think much of my work but we have started a trend - competitors are now copying the product we have created. They feel threatened.

    If you think , ALs defines intelligence, and general business aptitude in a commercial environment you are gravely mistaken, and by hr filtering people out so crudely means they may not always get the best people for that role.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Not at all I spent most my days at school getting kicked out,lol. It shows im willing to use physical intervention to get what i want. Not scared of conflict or a bit of violence. Getting a good A-Level IT grade will get you on a decent A-Level scheme with an IT company and a reasonable salary with a degree in 5 years in computer science guaranteed.
    lol

    That's crazy. Why doesn't everyone just take A-level ICT and then p**s their way onto the CS career path? Mystifying.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    I have nothing to prove by retaking AL IT. It is a waste of time.

    I am working as a IT professional, you might not think much of my work but we have started a trend - competitors are now copying the product we have created. They feel threatened.

    If you think , ALs defines intelligence, and general business aptitude in a commercial environment you are gravely mistaken, and by hr filtering people out so crudely means they may not always get the best people for that role.
    A system is always going to have its flaws, but it seems to work that is why they haven't changed it.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Depends the higher up you get the less they would look at A-Levels and more specialist you become. At the same time when you get to a certain age you don't need grad scheme. But at the same time people frown upon companies they have never heard of, because the likelihood the person employing you isn't even a specialist in that industry, just a paper pusher.
    You are assuming that I want to go corporate and work for someone else for the rest of my life.

    Guess what - I don't, and I am in the perfect industry to go self employed if I wanted too.
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    (Original post by Jooooshy)
    lol

    That's crazy. Why doesn't everyone just take A-level ICT and then p**s their way onto the CS career path? Mystifying.
    Do you read a newspaper? That is why so many large companies are offering people with decent Alevels the opportunity to do a apprenticeship get a degree and work, £16-20k for someone that has just finished school is good. Its not only computer science i was getting it into his head the importance of alevels. Why don't u read a newspaper, look at JP Morgan, PWC, KPMG,Ernest &Young, Capgemmi... I could go on forever. I was just stating IT because its an Alevel doesn't matter if it was a decent grade in Ancient History. Any little kid that gets BBB or above is going to be ahead at that age.
 
 
 
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