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Oxford or Cambridge for Law and do you reckon I have a chance to get in? Watch

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    (Original post by gmseahorse)
    Your GCSEs are quite weak for Oxford and you don't have the excuse of coming from an awful school. This means that if you apply to a competitive college you'll be ruled out very quickly. However if you make an open application and have a stunning LNAT essay you might stand a chance of getting an interview.
    If you get 93% ums average at a level you should apply to Cambridge and not give it a second thought.
    If you get below 90% average then you should probably go for Oxford.
    Definitely go for one of them just to have a go. It's definitely an experience worth having.
    Am I right in saying that open applications are allocated by computer at random ?
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    (Original post by Old_Simon)
    Am I right in saying that open applications are allocated by computer at random ?
    Yes that is correct.
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    (Original post by gmseahorse)
    Your GCSEs are quite weak for Oxford and you don't have the excuse of coming from an awful school. This means that if you apply to a competitive college you'll be ruled out very quickly. However if you make an open application and have a stunning LNAT essay you might stand a chance of getting an interview.
    If you get 93% ums average at a level you should apply to Cambridge and not give it a second thought.
    If you get below 90% average then you should probably go for Oxford.
    Definitely go for one of them just to have a go. It's definitely an experience worth having.
    I come from a fairly new school about 10 years old and although it is private my GCSE results were in the top 10 for the school
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    (Original post by andreastitan)
    Yes that is correct.
    So the suggestion above of trying to avoid "competitive" colleges with an open application may not be the best strategy.
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    (Original post by Old_Simon)
    So the suggestion above of trying to avoid "competitive" colleges with an open application may not be the best strategy.
    So what do you suggest?
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    (Original post by andreastitan)
    I checked the reading lists on the university sites and also some advice from lawyers etc. I'm reading some more advanced topics that are actually used in the BAR exams and also essentially learning about each aspect of the legal system.
    Reading the stuff contained in the BPTC is monumentally useless, Oxbridge couldn't give a damn how staggering your knowledge of the CPR is. Nor will they give one about your horn playing, don't gete wrong there are outstanding opportunities to play once you get there, but I had 8 theory and practical, they couldn't care less.

    Look at the different courses, Oxford's is quite distinctive, Cam's is more in line with other unis.
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    (Original post by andreastitan)
    I come from a fairly new school about 10 years old and although it is private my GCSE results were in the top 10 for the school
    How many pupils in your year?
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    (Original post by andreastitan)
    So what do you suggest?
    Show there's something globular down there and apply to Churchill.
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    (Original post by andreastitan)
    So what do you suggest?
    Well I am not sure how to find out which colleges are "less popular" for law. I don't know if having only a small number of law students is any type of indicator. But I would actively seek out colleges which generally do not attract the vast majority of the cohort. I would also look for a college which kind of matches as best it can my personal style and background so I would "fit in".
    Thorough research might pay good dividends. For example off the top of my head I would not apply to Trinity, St Johns, Downing or Pembroke if I was a weak candidate for Law at Cambridge. There may be others.
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    (Original post by Med_medine)
    How many pupils in your year?
    47
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    (Original post by Old_Simon)
    Well I am not sure how to find out which colleges are "less popular" for law. I don't know if having only a small number of law students is any type of indicator. But I would actively seek out colleges which generally do not attract the vast majority of the cohort. I would also look for a college which kind of matches as best it can my personal style and background so I would "fit in".
    Thorough research might pay good dividends. For example off the top of my head I would not apply to Trinity, St Johns, Downing or Pembroke if I was a weak candidate for Law at Cambridge. There may be others.
    Preferably a college which accommodates sport as I play football for the U21 team of my academy
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    (Original post by andreastitan)
    I'm not trying to prove them wrong, I am simply arguing the other side of it. Ok sure maybe I should have had lets say 1-2 more A* at GCSE, but don't you think a high score on the LNAT would at least allow me to get an interview spot. Also how many A levels would you feel is impressive? They ask for 3As and I'm doing 5 A levels which hopefully I get the grades I want.
    What do you mean by slight, you are at a huge disadvantage.

    By 5 A levels being not impressive, let me elaborate on that.

    Firstly, interview offers are based on GCSE and LNAT provided you are predicted in 3 A levels with the minimum entry requirement.

    Secondly, unless you are doing 7 A levels, 5 is hardly a lot more work than 3 or 4. Getting 5As in A levels wont put you advantage over 3 or 4A*s

    It is also arrogant for you to think you would nail the LNAT considering you bombed your GCSEs

    You would require an exceptionally high LNAT to make up for your GCSEs and the chances are quite low

    Sorry to be the one to spell out the blatant truth





    (Original post by andreastitan)
    I'm not over-confident by any means, I'm just trying to say that the GCSE grades may put me at a slight disadvantage but not a major blow as some of you say. I have accepted that they might be a bit below the average applicant but ok.
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    (Original post by andreastitan)
    Preferably a college which accommodates sport as I play football for the U21 team of my academy
    There is no such thing as an Oxbridge college which does not play a lot of sport.
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    (Original post by Med_medine)
    What do you mean by slight, you are at a huge disadvantage.

    By 5 A levels being not impressive, let me elaborate on that.

    Firstly, interview offers are based on GCSE and LNAT provided you are predicted in 3 A levels with the minimum entry requirement.

    Secondly, unless you are doing 7 A levels, 5 is hardly a lot more work than 3 or 4. Getting 5As in A levels wont put you advantage over 3 or 4A*s

    It is also arrogant for you to think you would nail the LNAT considering you bombed your GCSEs

    You would require an exceptionally high LNAT to make up for your GCSEs and the chances are quite low

    Sorry to be the one to spell out the blatant truth
    You're blatantly exaggerating, firstly I never said I will do well on the LNAT's I was speaking hypothetically as it is evident and bombed my GCSE's I have 1-2 less A* than the usual applicant.
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    (Original post by Old_Simon)
    There is no such thing as an Oxbridge college which does not play a lot of sport.
    OK thanks
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    (Original post by andreastitan)
    OK thanks
    Students coming from public schools are used to playing sport 5 days a week even in the sixth form.
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    (Original post by Old_Simon)
    Students coming from public schools are used to playing sport 5 days a week even in the sixth form.
    I train 6 times a week it's not an issue
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    (Original post by andreastitan)
    47
    Top 10 out of 47 means you have practically no chance

    Oxbridge states on their site they look for top 1 or 2% of students in the country

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    (Original post by andreastitan)
    You're blatantly exaggerating, firstly I never said I will do well on the LNAT's I was speaking hypothetically as it is evident and bombed my GCSE's I have 1-2 less A* than the usual applicant.
    Compare to the average offer holders not applicants

    There is a reason why the averages are widely apart

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    (Original post by Med_medine)
    Top 10 out of 47 means you have practically no chance

    Oxbridge states on their site they look for top 1 or 2% of students in the country

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    It was top 10 in the school and top 50 in the country so yeah
 
 
 
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