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If you haven't studied it, you can't call it 'soft' Watch

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    (Original post by KettleMan)
    Regarding all those people who label certain subjects as 'soft' - Do you think these people have even studied said subjects? In my opinion you can only label a subject as 'soft' if you have studied it yourself.

    Psychology and Sociology certainly aren't 'soft' as far as I'm concerned. Michael Gove labelled these as 'soft'. As well as Astronomy???
    I agree with this, if you haven't done the subject you're in no place to comment on it's difficulty.

    (Original post by TaciturnPhantom)
    I can recall a user on here calling GCSE art a "Mickey Mouse" subject. I disagree completely. Although I didn't take it, I can imagine that GCSE art students must have to work their arses off and put in so much time and effort to get those grades. I remember a girl in my year who took triple sciences, Spanish, art and history for her choices and she was predicted stellar grades in all subjects.

    I think art is one of the hardest subjects that you can choose for one of your GCSE options, and I admire those who take it.
    I hated Art so much, it was hell! It's in no way soft, despite what people say about it.
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    i do both lens and light basd art - as well as fine art.

    poeple label these as soft, as do my parents. but i enjoy them, and they are actaully pretty hard.

    i also do music. also calle soft. its not. the amount of thoery i need t know is quite a lot, and its not easy stuff also.

    i also do performing arts. its hard, but poeple still call it soft.


    this comes from someone who is in the lowest science class, and in the second to lowest math class, as well as te second to lowest english class, becuase of the fact this person cant cope all that well in exams.
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    (Original post by jabire3)
    I didn't do Business Studies but when you've got a exam paper full of multiply choice questions, you start to wonder how it's a GCSE.
    Every single exam at UK Medical Schools are multiple choice.

    Multiple choice exams are not an indicator of the difficulty of an exam.
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    (Original post by Rooster523)
    Every single exam at UK Medical Schools are multiple choice.

    Multiple choice exams are not an indicator of the difficulty of an exam.
    http://www.edexcel.com/migrationdocu...e_20110112.pdf

    I'm sorry, but that's just ridiculous, you don't need to study to pass that. Plus, the Coursework is pathetic. I know, not everyone is at the same ability and there needs to be subjects for those who aren't as capable, but it's a joke of a gcse, it really is.
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    (Original post by KettleMan)
    Just to add, here are subjects that I myself have studied, which are labelled as 'soft' (and my thoughts on each):

    Psychology - Requires a TON of revision
    Sociology - Requires a fair amount of revision, although easier than Psychology
    Media - I guess I agree that this one is 'soft'
    Drama - For me personally, it was easy
    Law - Not 'soft' at all. Requires lots of revision, and is just as challenging as History
    lol who says law is soft?
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    People say Textiles is soft, and I have completed the GCSE. I agree to some extent as the theory is not too difficult but the wordings of the exams are not easy at all. The coursework is deffo not 'soft', as we have to complete about 30 pages of A3 sheets (including designs and a lot of research and information), and we also have to design and make a fashion or interior item, which is highly time consuming and everything is taken into consideration (including the straightness of your stitches). It is enjoyable, but definitely not soft it is hard work!
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    (Original post by jabire3)
    http://www.edexcel.com/migrationdocu...e_20110112.pdf

    I'm sorry, but that's just ridiculous, you don't need to study to pass that. Plus, the Coursework is pathetic. I know, not everyone is at the same ability and there needs to be subjects for those who aren't as capable, but it's a joke of a gcse, it really is.
    lol i have never studied business because i think its stupid, i reckon id get an A on that paper by judging the first three questions. business is something you experience, never the same as study. its like learning how to drive by only using a book rather than getting hours under your belt.
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    Management and Business related courses are very soft. I know it because I've taken a number of their modules and seen a lot of their exams while studying something a lot more serious (civil engineering) that requires more than just common sense. Their exams are a complete joke and so is their content.
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    I could never get a decent grade for Art GCSE so would rather do Further Pure Maths instead I wouldn't say untraditional subjects are on the whole easier, because for me some of them certainly aren't.

    As for whether one can call certain subjects 'soft' without having studied it - well, surely you can tell whether a subject is a traditional one at first glance. But being called 'soft' doesn't necessarily mean they are easy. You could find a traditional, academic subject easier than say, Music or Drama, if you didn't enjoy performing in front of a crowd. Therefore in my opinion when calling some subjects 'soft' it means they are less academic, not easier.
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    Gove was an idiot
    But social sciences are easier you can blag your way through and far less emphasis on learning technical concept or applying numerical skills
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    Soft just means that it's is not as respected as the Hard ones which are traditional subjects.
    It has almost nothing to do with the actual courses worth and how hard it is, it is more about its status towards higher institutions.
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    (Original post by KettleMan)
    Regarding all those people who label certain subjects as 'soft' - Do you think these people have even studied said subjects? In my opinion you can only label a subject as 'soft' if you have studied it yourself.

    Psychology and Sociology certainly aren't 'soft' as far as I'm concerned. Michael Gove labelled these as 'soft'. As well as Astronomy???
    I completely agree with you, I know I took GCSE product design which is regarded as a soft subject and I think it was the hardest subject I took! I'm taking 4 'hard' Alevels purely because I find 'soft ' subjects ridiculously hard and I have so much respect for people taking them because I know I would fail if I took them!
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    I only study to get into university (going into Year 12 now). So, I want to study what I like - and, more importantly, what universities like. If they find what is 'soft' to be such, I'm not going to study it, right?

    Which would I rather take with me to my future?

    Media Studies... or English?
    Psychology... or Biology?
    Politics and Law... or History?

    Universities almost unanimously choose the latter. Tried-and-tested subjects with proven rigour, that broaden one's knowledge whilst preparing them for their university course. Of course, Politics and Law may offer the same level of coverage and preparation, but it wouldn't matter if the universities didn't value it to the same level. I wouldn't choose it. Psychology could potentially be a lot more interesting than Biology, but I won't get into medicine with it.

    That's why I have Maths, History, Chemistry and Biology as my A Levels. I'm taking no chances with subjects that anyone can say is fluff.
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    (Original post by EL704)
    ...
    Haha! I love how things are taken so differently from the tone intended!
    No, I wasn't trying to be bitter, I just found that the atmosphere was very 'prep school' oriented and not for me. The lecturers I spoke to seemed interesting enough, but it was the other applicants who literally looked at me in disgust as I disagreed with them in group task. The lecturer actually liked the fact that I had chosen something different to everyone else and used individual opinion but the looks and whispers I got as we left the interview room... it was just plain cliquey-*****y and I heard them mutter about state school kids.


    I can understand this as I actually had a somewhat similar experience at my interview (for Maths). A chinese girl arrived in the common room where we were waiting for interviews, asked around to see what subjects everyone else was doing, and when she found out I was Maths (As she was also) she asked me if I'd seen any other chinese applicants. I thought she was homesick and replied with "No, but the rest of us don't bite" and was met with the response "No, it's just that we chinese are really good at Maths and I want to see how much actual competition I have". To my great pleasure she did not get in. The anecdote is not largely relevant (just amusing). However, I think its unfair to blame the uni for some of the applicants not being particularly nice, and I haven't seen anyone who has gotten in who acts like that.

    A lot of people I have met (over the last ten years since my experience) have explicitly said either they had a parent of friend who knew someone or came from a private school where they were literally prepped - mock interviews, mock entrance exams, - before they got there, which is an unfair advantage as this is not offered everywhere. Also the fact that there are no private schools in Wales, means that it is impossible to get that kind of education. I got my A's at A level with my own hard work (A*s didn't exist back then - but they would have been as I was in the 95% + bracket of A grade) - basically there is minimal assistance to be able to get you into the mindset of applying - people assume that IF you go to uni, it will be the local college. I literally had teachers looking surprised when I said I was applying - despite being the top of my classes.

    Some students are put off applying by their school but this is a failing of the school, not of the university. Cambridge does massive amounts of outreach work to try combat this.

    I found the atmosphere there, from going round and speaking with current students to be very depressing and divided - in Southampton, I had mates who had lived on a council estate to having mansions and we never had that divisive atmosphere, and of all the other uni's I visited, Cambridge was the worst for it, Oxford was less cliquey in that manner. I still find it to be snobbery to class any subjects as 'soft' as they just use different strengths to what archaic opinions of higher education should be about.

    Objectively the subjects aren't as good preparation for their course, and Cambridge makes sure in the interests of fairness that applicants are aware of this. Nothing wrong with that in my opinion.

    When I applied to Cambridge, they had very little support for state school applicants, and they had to include a quota of state school applicants in their offers as they were told they were being too elitist. They have obviously increased their quota - from news reports - as well as attempting to increase their ethnic diversity and this was aimed at South East England,

    Obviously, if times have changed, then it is excellent for that to finally have happened - I know that state school applications changed due to increase of fees, hence introducing more assisted funding opportunities, so you were lucky that you were able to get that as an option. I honestly wasn't trying to cause any arguments, it is just my experience was that the other students already there and the applicants there were not very friendly, and they switched as soon as they heard I didn't go to a private school. ( I have an RP accent so they didn't know where I was from, until I said about my school).


    I definitely have had the opposite experience to you. Out of interest, what college did you apply to?

    They should print a list of "Subjects to study" for each course and make it freely available prior to people choosing A levels, as some people who may have been encouraged to apply would be unable to just because they took Art or something.

    They do - on the website this whole argument stemmed from, in their prospectus and in a general Russell group booklet (called "informed choices", I think), all of which are freely available online.
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    BTEC sport is most definitely soft!
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    (Original post by TaciturnPhantom)
    I can recall a user on here calling GCSE art a "Mickey Mouse" subject. I disagree completely. Although I didn't take it, I can imagine that GCSE art students must have to work their arses off and put in so much time and effort to get those grades. I remember a girl in my year who took triple sciences, Spanish, art and history for her choices and she was predicted stellar grades in all subjects.

    I think art is one of the hardest subjects that you can choose for one of your GCSE options, and I admire those who take it.
    Why thank you
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    I definitely have had the opposite experience to you. Out of interest, what college did you apply to?

    They do - on the website this whole argument stemmed from, in their prospectus and in a general Russell group booklet (called "informed choices", I think), all of which are freely available online.[/QUOTE]


    I applied to Trinity for English Lit, also when I applied the websites were fairly useless as they merely had the course description, grades and pretty much that was it! Now there's much more information available at your fingertips! I've definitely found that applying to uni this time round has been so much faster and easier as you can access things like the league tables online... last time we had to wait for the newspaper one to come out and hope they had the info I needed!

    I meant more that their 'outreach' should be sending all schools a booklet / poster/ pamphlet that can be given available so pre GCSE's and A Level choices are made, they can see which subjects are seemingly 'no point studying' if you want to go down a more academic route. Which is where there are obvious advantages in private schools as they either don't offer the 'soft' subjects, or they make it clear to avoid these. I feel all universities need to be more interactive with schools.

    One of my best friends went to a maths summer school at Oxford, and it was because her mother didn't work, they sent a leaflet to her - which yes is outreach, but uni's seem to target the wealthy, via their schools and the ones on government lists of receiving some form of benefit - there's a huge amount of people in the gap in the middle that are told we aren't wealthy or poor enough to have any guidance.

    It seems so strange that they don't do like a 'jobs fair' but for universities coming to the actual schools... we literally had the local college where we were dragged around and told this was to be our goal.... fair enough, for some students, they did go there and they had never even considered university before. Unless they do in England? It's very strange sometimes how Ireland, Wales and Scotland sort of get 'left out' of the 'uni recruitment drive' they seem to do. Unless, again, they have started to?

    For example, I literally only had heard of Russell Group from the snarky remarks - "They shouldn't stop some people getting into Russell Group Uni's.... they don't belong..." etc... at the time of interview - I obviously then looked it up when I got home!

    A lot of my mates I made in uni had applied to Oxbridge and ended up in Soton too, on a range of courses and found it to be quite 'cliquey' too which is what I meant when I started discussing it, even the ones who went to private schools complained about it!

    I'd like to see all schools and uni's having more interaction before A level time, like getting students in to talk to pupils about careers and things - we had a government 'careers advisor' I swear she was a jobcentre woman, and she had this awful computer programme, asked what subjects you did in school and then it randomised an awful list of 'your careers'

    On mine it said only "Teacher." and I said... er... no thanks.. and she just looked at me as if, oh... and then that was all the advice I got. pretty much the same sort of rubbish you get in the job centre too tbh!!! Except, when I first graduated they gave the good old,

    "Oh... you're over-qualified...."

    to which I replied, "Well, not really, you don't have anything that requires my qualifications on offer."

    At which they went a bit red and then agreed.

    Then I had to get myself even more 'overqualified' by retraining in order to 'fit' jobs that were available... crazy....

    If they offered, like in France, the Baccalaureate - I don't mean that awful copy Welsh Bac - you specialise early on and then there are no 'soft subjects' as you are geared towards a specialised university -

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baccalauréat

    so If you specialise in a baccalaureat scientifique - maths, physics, chem, biol and engineering is what you study from around GCSE time, and by the time you get to university, you are ready for medicine, engineering or the natural sciences - no nonsense about what is 'soft' or 'appropriate' to your degree as you know immediately what's available from studying that 'vein' of the baccalaureat.

    Yes, there is less choice, but it makes more sense. I was in the 1st year that AS levels popped into existence, and so we literally had exams in school in Yr1, Yr2 - Sats - Yr 5 + 6 - Sats, Yr 8 + 9 Sats, Yr10+11GCSE, Yr12 As Levels, Yr13 A2 ...... four years of geared study would have been so much easier!!!!
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    (Original post by KettleMan)
    Regarding all those people who label certain subjects as 'soft' - Do you think these people have even studied said subjects? In my opinion you can only label a subject as 'soft' if you have studied it yourself.

    Psychology and Sociology certainly aren't 'soft' as far as I'm concerned. Michael Gove labelled these as 'soft'. As well as Astronomy???
    Agreed. If you've never studied it you can't say anything about it.

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    lel michael gove :P
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    (Original post by KettleMan)
    Psychology and Sociology certainly aren't 'soft' as far as I'm concerned.
    Sociology is the softest degree I could ever think of.
 
 
 
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