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    (Original post by Dehydrated)
    I have no doubt that it often has some educational benefits, but, again, I'm highly skeptical that they're worth pretty much missing out on a "normal childhood" for.

    Pursuing things out of the standard curriculum is great - for example, if a kid seemed to be an incredibly skilled tennis player at 10 or something, I could see the parents home-schooling them till 16 or something. But what if it didn't work out and the kid had missed out on a large part of their teenage years for nothing? Do kids really have the ability to decide stuff like that for themselves at such a young age? Should parents be allowed to decide for them (as is probably usually the case), either?

    Also - going back to my main point, if you were home-schooled, how did you socialise? I don't mean to be mean, but knowing people other than my friend who have also been home-schooled and of course knowing plenty of people who did go to school, there is really quite a significant difference in their social skills. There is quite simply no substitute I can think of for the school environment, short of "home-schooling" parents pretty much setting up their own mini-classes which I've never seen and is a school in all but name anyway.

    One-to-one teaching and all that attention and focus, while undoubtedly great, can also lead to a child being unusually too sheltered (from what I've seen). In the real world, you're going to have to learn to just be "one of the crowd" and do as you're told/listen to authority in the vast majority of jobs. School teaches you that. You're also going to have to learn to stick to a timetable, deal with people who don't like you and even bullies, and get on with other people. School teaches you that.

    If a child doesn't learn key social skills by the time they are 16 and start college (or even 18 and go to university/enter the workforce), being that behind is going to affect their lives. Including their studies. I've seen it in people other than my friend. They have to play "catch up" socially. How would you feel being the only kid on the first day at university who probably had no real "home friends" to talk about and not much of a "normal childhood" in common with the other kids?

    If life were all about education and pursuing your talents, I'd be all for home-schooling. But it's about more than that.
    Normal doesn't mean it is the best method.

    Parents should have input into the decision to home educate, but forcing the child to leave/not go to school is a tricky area. One could argue that the parents know what is best for the child, but you could also make arguments against it. If it doesn't work out, at least they tried, and they haven't 'missed out' on much, which should become clear after my next paragraph.

    I joined various clubs, including a trampoline club, a martial arts group, and Scouts. There are also some home education groups available, specifically for home educated children. I made several friends there, so my social skills have not suffered at all. What is so great about the 'school environment'?

    I suppose you have a point when you say that children can become too sheltered, but this is easily rectified by encouraging them to learn things for themselves, (Which I had to, as in some areas I went beyond what my parents could teach me). The martial arts group I joined taught respect for authority far better than a lot of teachers could (The instructor didn't tolerate any nonsense whatsoever). Having seen some students at various colleges, I would say they haven't been taught respect for authority very well.

    You have a point with bullying, but this can be encountered in Scouts, or other groups you might join, so children are not necessarily strangers to it.

    I would suggest that children go to sixth form, as this does give them experience of a formal education environment, while hopefully being a bit mature than a school environment. I doubt that home educated children will be missing 'key social skills' if the parents are responsible.

    In summary, I fail to see how home education prevents children from learning social skills, or any of the other drawbacks you have mentioned, although as I said, sixth form may be a good idea, as then the child gets the best of both worlds.
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    Yes I would home school my children if I could afford to. I think school exposes children to sexual things way too soon in their life.

    For example, one of my Year 7 girls shouted out in my maths lesson "I would let him bone me" - the comment was about Zayn Malik; this shocked me.

    I would not want my children to be raised like this.
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    (Original post by Dehydrated)
    Yes, surprisingly enough, we are all aware of networking :rolleyes: Your dodging around my question and trying to brush this issue off with "lmao" is pretty telling. And you seriously think networking makes up for having friends? Please - don't make me laugh. This sort of perspective on life is exactly why I am not going to home-school my kids. The lack of social awareness would be hilarious, if I didn't (honestly) pity you knowing how you're probably going to get on with others at uni.

    Also - again, you're seriously unaware that the vast majority of people at uni have home friends and the majority of these home friends will have been made at school? SMH, just SMH. :lol: Had you gone to school, you'd certainly be aware of this fact. Trust me, it will hit you cold and hard once you do actually start university. Even more so if you go early.

    Instead of trotting around with the kind of obnoxious superiority complex that will probably also discredit you in the social stakes at uni, I'm going to give you some serious advice: If you haven't already, make home friends. You are almost certainly not going to fit in the way you are (in b4 "I don't want to fit in, I'm happy having zero social life through uni"). And try being a little less arrogant and brushing up on your social skills generally, too.
    This is blowing my mind. Have fun studying at a non top 5 uni

    "I don't like talking to people, I don't like smalltalk, I detest extroverts, I hate talking to people who I feel are not worth my time, I hate betas, I hate people who try and fit in, I hate gossips, I hate people who pretend to be something different, I hate lag. Basically I hate everything.

    No-one advised me to be myself, I just choose to be who I am and not like the following sheep who live in the shadows of others and peak at high school.

    That cover it?" -Straight from my profile.

    For the record, I self studied for iGCSE's and I did fine.

    Spoiler:
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    And by fine I mean ****ing amazing.
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    I would.
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    (Original post by Dehydrated)
    I agree with you about "teaching bullies not to bully," but, in practice, unless society goes through some major upheaval we are always going to have bullies even in relatively "grown-up" environments like uni. And obviously people are going to have to socialise at some point. So it makes sense for them to learn social skills ASAP IMO :dontknow:

    Sorry to hear that :hugs:

    I do think some schools can obviously learn to deal with bullying/improve their teaching standards better. But, short of a school being really bad, I still think that kids should learn to be in that kind of environment sooner rather than later. I mean, even as an adult, you're not going to always have a boss you like (esp. as a new graduate), be able to do exactly what you like whenever you want and work on your own/avoid those you don't like, unless you are extremely privileged and fortunate to get a very unique kind of job.
    Yeah obviously not everyone is nice, I don't think subjecting someone to horrible people is the best way to get them to deal with it though.

    See I believe in teaching my kids to be individual and carve their own path than following normal ones
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    I've been thinking about this a lot tbh. If the country carries on going down the radical feminist route I might be forced to homeschool my future children so they aren't brainwashed.

    It would be a viable option for me because my career path allows me to work at home if I want to.
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    Home school for the win!
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    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    I want to but my boyfriend doesn't.

    I don't like how schools churn out nice little drones and stamp the individuality out of people. I also don't like the bullying culture, pathetic social norms and childish games. I hated school.

    My boyfriend wants to give them the choice
    I agree with this. You can see the types of drones it produces on TSR lmao. I have homeschooled friends who aren't lacking in social skills at all and are the most outgoing people I know as well.
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    No.



    'Nuff said.
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    All the sociopath weirdos happen to be homeschooled :afraid:. And people talk about publicly schooled children :ahee: We learn the ways of life being around others even if they suck. Not those who are home-schooled. My mom's best friend just got attacked with a gardening tool (well not just, a couple yrs ago) by her daughter, who she home-schooled. They must've got sick of each other and the girl lost it, 14 at the time now in another home crying and wearing make up and giving boys handies. Oh well. Never liked her anyway.
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    I was home educated from 11 to 16. We aren't a rich family, so my mums choice to help me come out of school as I couldn't cope was very nice. As for subjects, you only need to study a certain curriculum for it to satisfy local education authorities who would visit monthly. So things like art etc are optional. I still went on day trips and had all the experiences. I went to college at 16, and am now 20 and studying at the University of Surrey on a computer science degree.

    I don't think I missed out on anything and I think I turned out alright! xD if anybody wants to ask questions feel free
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    Kristin Stewart was home-schooled. See how psycho she is :grumble:

    An infamous killer who was shot dead in Connecticut (Google Sandy Hook shooting; he just killed all these kids for no reason) Adam something...was home-schooled.

    Just all these psychos happen to be home-schooled, as well as people who finally were able to come to public school they were always socially awks and got into trouble and begged to go home lol
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    (Original post by ChickenMadness)
    I agree with this. You can see the types of drones it produces on TSR lmao. I have homeschooled friends who aren't lacking in social skills at all and are the most outgoing people I know as well.
    Never met a normal home-schooled person :nope: Even the way they walked was weird, like they think every place is their bathroom.
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    Hell no, they need to spend time with other kids and learn to socialize. If I homeschool them they will end up socially retarded hermits. No offence to anyone here who was home schooled
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    I'm currently home educating two of my children. Home education is the British term; home schooling is American. Both terms are something of a misnomer, since it doesn't have to take place at home!

    It also doesn't have to resemble schooling. It can, of course, if that style of learning suits your child, but there are also many other ways to approach learning. It also doesn't have to just be the parent teaching/facilitating. Some people use distance learning courses, local tutors, tutors over skype, skills swaps, cooperatives, etc.

    One of the reasons we home educate is because of the diversity of people with whom they can socialise - different ages, backgrounds, cultures, religious beliefs... , a much wider range than if they were to attend a local school. They have no shortage of friends, and because we can have control over their studying they have the freedom to do much more with their free time. We have the freedom to take holidays during the schools term times, which gives families the opportunity to visit places they might not be able to afford in peak season for a huge range of educational experiences. Many home educators attend home ed camps, ranging from small local ones with 20 or 30 families, up to festivals with over 1,000 people attending.

    Home educating also offers much greater flexibility as far as the level of work. Not many schools could accommodate GCSE level study of 4 sciences alongside y8 maths & introductory languages. It would be a logistical nightmare to timetable if everyone were allowed to proceed at a pace individual to them.
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    (Original post by ChickenMadness)
    I agree with this. You can see the types of drones it produces on TSR lmao. I have homeschooled friends who aren't lacking in social skills at all and are the most outgoing people I know as well.
    Exactly
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    hell no, sounds like a great way to screw up your child's development
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    Why do people seem to think school is the only place you can make friends?
    Did none of you have childhood friends from next door, friends from your football or relatives the same age?
    My boyfriend went to school but never really had any friends until uni, but the one really good friend he's always had was the boy who lived next door to his Gran. And they're still best friends now.

    It just looks like you all think home schooled children will be trapped in a basement with a textbook. :rofl:
    And I've seen PLENTY of "socially inept" people come out of schools.
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    (Original post by Mubariz)
    I agree with this. It's not just the "arty" kids though, it's usually anybody with half a brain that can get bullied.

    I'd seriously consider home schooling my kids to be fair, I reckon I could give them a better education than my useless teachers did. I may have to have a private tutor for them but homeschooling is a viable option.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Ye I think this too. I had a real ******* with the whole education system while I was in school and didn't agree with it at all. Was just so eye rolling how we didn't learn anything apart from being able to tick off checklists for marks. The vast majority of usefull information I've learnt on my own outside of school. School just taught me that exam marks are the most important thing for getting to the next stage and that cheating is the easiest way to progress through the system.
    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    I don't agree. No situation I've ever encountered outside of school has been like that. Id have been much happier being homeschooled.
    Same. looking back at the later years of my childhood makes me want to cry tbh.
    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    Yeah obviously not everyone is nice, I don't think subjecting someone to horrible people is the best way to get them to deal with it though.

    See I believe in teaching my kids to be individual and carve their own path than following normal ones
    Strongly agree. You can really get brainwashed and pushed into things at school if you don't view everything critically.

    edit: why is 'p r o b l e m' filtered?

    and I'm not even from a chavvy family and I've been subjected to violence and all sorts as a result of going to a ****'ole of a school.
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    (Original post by fnatic NateDestiel)
    This is blowing my mind. Have fun studying at a non top 5 uni

    "I don't like talking to people, I don't like smalltalk, I detest extroverts, I hate talking to people who I feel are not worth my time, I hate betas, I hate people who try and fit in, I hate gossips, I hate people who pretend to be something different, I hate lag. Basically I hate everything.

    No-one advised me to be myself, I just choose to be who I am and not like the following sheep who live in the shadows of others and peak at high school.

    That cover it?" -Straight from my profile.

    For the record, I self studied for iGCSE's and I did fine.

    Spoiler:
    Show
    And by fine I mean ****ing amazing.
    I can tell you are going to be popular :rolleyes:

    here is a little tip; people don't like antisocial jerks, and people don't hire people they don't like. Good luck networking
 
 
 
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