Do you support the same party as your parents? Watch

Poll: Do you vote for the same party as your parents?
Yes - (both parents) (6)
12.24%
Yes - (one parent) (12)
24.49%
No (31)
63.27%
Ggmu!
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#41
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#41
My parents don't have any allegiance and tend to vote for whoever party looks to run the country best for the next 5 years. Don't understand lifelong allegiance to a single party.

Currently we're all conservative.

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Le Nombre
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#42
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#42
Dad votes Tory, Mum Labour. I usually vote Labour or Lib Dem.

UKIP have at least provided something for us to have a united front on politically for the first time ever, I particularly enjoyed opening the door with 'I'm a corporate lawyer who has worked at EuroParl, what do you think?'.
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Rakas21
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#43
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#43
(Original post by Louis.)
Your EU point stands out to me. Soft Tories probably agree with the Lib Dems on a lot, but the Lib Dems being massively internationalist will stop a lot of them switching. And the EU will be a massive issue in the next parliament.

I just don't think there's any electoral benefit to be had on the current path. Purely looking at electoral results Clegg's leadership has been a catastrophic failure. He has taken the party to the right ever since 2007, accelerating after May 2010. Results between 2007 and May 2010 were bad, results after May 2010 have been even worse. For me there's no reason why going further to the right would reverse this trend, in fact it seems to exacerbate it.

I can't see any potential gains of right leaning voters coming close to making up for the amount of left leaning voters the Lib Dems lost. The impression I get from Tories is that they sympathise with the "Orange Book aims" without seriously considering voting Lib Dem. And to actually change their minds at the ballot box he'd have to drag the party so far right that the original base would be completely alienated and he'd basically be starting a new party.
Results between 2007 and 2010 were bad? Hit 28% for the 09 council elections, gained 1% in the generals (ICM polls show this not to be Clegg Mania - they were over 20% before the debates).

The fact that he's moved right is not the problem, it's that his current strategy is to win back those lefties who have left which instantly removes the prospect of gaining Tories. If your going to piss off half your base by going into bed with Tories then you should be aiming to take Tories because those lefties won't forgive him. Like Cameron, he has no vision for the future of his party anymore.
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Obiejess
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#44
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#44
(Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
lol

I'm in the same position.

Show them this
http://anotherangryvoice.blogspot.co...een-party.html

This man has everything :moon:


Either they care so much about immigration being limited and withdrawal from the EU (Green offer a in out referendum so that isn;t realy an excuse for a left wing ukip voter) that they don't care even if UKIP had a baby eating policy or they actually don't understand what UKIP are.

It's depressing that the protest party is neoliberals on steroids party. They are an extreme version of the status quo for gods sake. (other than EU withdrawal). They don't give a **** about UK sovereignty when it comes to letting american corporations carve up our public services though or having the power to sue our government.

WHatever you do don;t let them give you the old you will get more right wing as you get older speech.


It;s aq pain in the ass being so politicaly isolated. Just a source of getting angry at everything.
I have tried every possible way of telling my parents that they are effectively encouraging a further push to the right by voting UKIP but they just say I know nothing about it, have barely been alive five minutes and hence do not deserve an opinion apparently.

God, my parents can be politically infantile sometimes. Unfortunately, when I dare to speak our against the utter tripe they often preach it results in the confiscation of my phone, laptop etc. for being 'narcissistic' and 'arrogant' and never admitting I could be wrong :facepalm:

It's quite stifling, and probably why I come on here and rant :lol:

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Rakas21
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#45
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#45
(Original post by TroyAndAbed)
I don't know who my parents vote for or who I would vote for so who knows.
Allow us to help you. Where do you stand in terms of political principles?
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Mackay
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#46
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#46
Parents are Labour. I'm Lib Dem.
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Obiejess
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#47
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#47
(Original post by Rakas21)
Allow us to help you. Where do you stand in terms of political principles?
Allow us to include a left-winger so this isn't biased

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Dalek1099
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#48
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#48
(Original post by Le Nombre)
Dad votes Tory, Mum Labour. I usually vote Labour or Lib Dem.

UKIP have at least provided something for us to have a united front on politically for the first time ever, I particularly enjoyed opening the door with 'I'm a corporate lawyer who has worked at EuroParl, what do you think?'.
How can your parents vote for parties that hate each other that much?Do they not have rows all the time?I couldn't see myself having a relationship with a Tory supporter I wouldn't like their right wing filth, which is blasphemy to my political beliefs.I deleted one of my Facebook friends after I found out they were a strong right wing supporter and I was disgusted by their views.

My parents vote Labour Party I vote Green Party.
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Louis.
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#49
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#49
(Original post by Rakas21)
Results between 2007 and 2010 were bad? Hit 28% for the 09 council elections, gained 1% in the generals (ICM polls show this not to be Clegg Mania - they were over 20% before the debates).

The fact that he's moved right is not the problem, it's that his current strategy is to win back those lefties who have left which instantly removes the prospect of gaining Tories. If your going to piss off half your base by going into bed with Tories then you should be aiming to take Tories because those lefties won't forgive him. Like Cameron, he has no vision for the future of his party anymore.
You've got to judge based on seats though, even if it's a poor system, and there was no breakthrough and in many areas a fall away. Marginal increases in % is hardly a success for a supposed protest party in a time of political disillusionment. The biggest electoral success in Nick Clegg's time as Lib Dem leader has been the Eastleigh by-election, which says a lot.

His current strategy isn't to win back those on the left, he's trying to place the party smack bang in the centre and appeal to both sides. But in 7 years of trying the Conservative vote has stayed put, so I don't think exclusively aiming to take them would be a successful strategy, particularly when much of your remaining base are people unhappy with life in coalition but recognising that it was the only choice given the 2010 results. The left hasn't abandoned the Lib Dems, it'd be silly to give up on them when there's no evidence of significant gains to be had by doing so.

Agree that there's no real vision. It's just damage limitation, get to May 2015 with ~35 seats and see what the parliamentary arithmetic throws up.
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Le Nombre
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#50
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#50
(Original post by Dalek1099)
How can your parents vote for parties that hate each other that much?Do they not have rows all the time?I couldn't see myself having a relationship with a Tory supporter I wouldn't like their right wing filth, which is blasphemy to my political beliefs.I deleted one of my Facebook friends after I found out they were a strong right wing supporter and I was disgusted by their views.

My parents vote Labour Party I vote Green Party.
No, they differ on the size of the State and how much tax should be paid, not, you know, whether they love each other.

It has caused some arguments, schools and the like, but they work it out.
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Dalek1099
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#51
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#51
(Original post by Le Nombre)
No, they differ on the size of the State and how much tax should be paid, not, you know, whether they love each other.

It has caused some arguments, schools and the like, but they work it out.
I always thought that with the left and the right one is moral and one is immoral if someone votes left then they should think their partners are bad people if they vote right etc maybe if there wasn't that much between the left and right parties that they voted for.I suppose Labour aren't even really left anymore, the Greens represent true left wing politics.I always thought religion and politics were intertwined and similar in that they represent our believes like left and right and atheism and theism could an atheism love a theist?Probably not because a lot of Atheists think religions are stupid and if God was real would hate him.
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Rakas21
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#52
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#52
(Original post by Dalek1099)
How can your parents vote for parties that hate each other that much?Do they not have rows all the time?I couldn't see myself having a relationship with a Tory supporter I wouldn't like their right wing filth, which is blasphemy to my political beliefs.I deleted one of my Facebook friends after I found out they were a strong right wing supporter and I was disgusted by their views.

My parents vote Labour Party I vote Green Party.
The vast majority of ordinary people do have a political lean but not to the extreme that they support a pure ideology or feel the need to ram it down people's throats. Personally I've always been more glad that the girl in question actually engages in politics rather than what those views are.

(Original post by Dalek1099)
I always thought that with the left and the right one is moral and one is immoral if someone votes left then they should think their partners are bad people if they vote right etc maybe if there wasn't that much between the left and right parties that they voted for.I suppose Labour aren't even really left anymore, the Greens represent true left wing politics.I always thought religion and politics were intertwined and similar in that they represent our believes like left and right and atheism and theism could an atheism love a theist?Probably not because a lot of Atheists think religions are stupid and if God was real would hate him.
That's actually quite a closed and offensive view. My support for foreign intervention is far more moral than a Marxist's pacifism for example.

Just as above, plenty of people can have a religious lean but beyond debate it does have to effect your relationship.
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Jammy Duel
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#53
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#53
I'm not entirely sure. Based in the 2010 elections, I definitely would vote the same as my mother, my father, I'm not so sure on; it is possible I do but at least equally likely I don't. If it were based on 2005 then I'm pretty sure it would be the same as him too.
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Jammy Duel
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#54
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#54
I imagine the large amount of "nos" is with our age dmographic largely voting for the more idealist parties, the likes of the lib dems and greens, while our parents have already largely realised how foolish that is
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Birkenhead
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#55
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#55
(Original post by Rakas21)
That's actually quite a closed and offensive view. My support for foreign intervention is far more moral than a Marxist's pacifism for example.

Just as above, plenty of people can have a religious lean but beyond debate it does have to effect your relationship.
...and that isn't narrow-minded?
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Rakas21
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#56
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#56
(Original post by Birkenhead)
...and that isn't narrow-minded?
A little. But then i like its based on pragmatism, the western world has the means to remove tyrants. A pacifist will sit back while people die.
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Birkenhead
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#57
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#57
(Original post by Rakas21)
A little. But then i like its based on pragmatism, the western world has the means to remove tyrants. A pacifist will sit back while people die.
I certainly agree with that, see my post in the poppy thread...just seemed a tad insistent.
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Badshah
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#58
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#58
No, my parents support Labour whereas I don't support any party. I couldn't care less about politics.
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tehFrance
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#59
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#59
(Original post by WKUK)
My parents are both Lib Dems and I used to support them as well because I assumed that they knew best, but as I took more interest in politics I realized that the I agree with the Conservatives on almost everything. I quickly went right wing and now cringe at how I used to defend Nick Clegg in arguments with friends.

Now I've broken free from the shackles of my left wing household I was wondering if anyone else has done something similar.
So do you vote for the same political party as your parents?
Yes, me and my father support the UMP, I'm actively involved with them and will be launching my political career soon through the UMP. I'm a Tory man in the UK although I hate Cameron.
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The Dictator
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#60
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#60
Nope. Black African first-generation immigrant parents, tribal Labour.

I support the Tories (with strong UKIP sympathies), having switched after about a year and a half of having strong socialist sympathies. When I was very young and getting more interested in politics (around the time when it was getting to the 2010 elections) I was very pro-Tory, but then the media was almost entirely anti-New Labour by that time after 13 years of their horrendous regime and 3 years of the disaster that was Gordon Brown. I quite liked Cameron back then too. Obviously now I see him for what he is.

My dad doesn't mind my allegiance so much, although he is not exactly overjoyed that I am a Tory supporter. My mum though (who is pretty pushy and kind of bossy) is quite disappointed by it. She thinks that the Tories are racists and she still has this victim complex on behalf of blacks, feeling that whites are out to get us as it were...ah well. Suppose it's a normal prejudice...

She is also put off by racial intermarriage, so I may have inherited that prejudice, even though I can see through its absurdity somewhat...I used to be more supportive of it though.
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