what do you learn in medical degree? Watch

DrAdrenaline
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#41
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#41
(Original post by Ronove)
If you were talking about a regular academic degree you would have a point. You wouldn't talk about doing a Nursing or Physiotherapy degree for the content rather than the end profession, nor would you talk about doing an apprenticeship in joinery because you want to be able to make kitchen cabinets in your spare time. You do it because of the job it qualifies you for. I realise that Medicine isn't quite as black and white as this, but it's more like this than a traditional science degree with a view to ending with the option of research or anything else.
yes, of course what you are saying is right, i am not disagreeing with you. just like all those examples, you do it because you want to become a nurse, physiotherapy, a doctor etc... but that doesn't mean that if you don't want to become those having those degree is going to be a waste.

I and other people regularly go to the gym not because we want to be a bodybuilder but because i like the person i am becoming by weight training and also i like it.

and of course i am not taking choosing medicine lightly and saying that everyone should do medicine because its an awesome degree, because i understand that its not for everyone, but still you get my point...

(Original post by Ronove)
It's all very well saying you're happy to commit to 6-7 years because of your interest in the material when you're 18/19. It'll be a different story if you find you're not into clinicals and/or you realise you don't want to be a doctor and you're bored to tears of university, especially when loads of your friends are graduating and leaving to be a grown-up.
i never get bored haha because all of these feelings you have is just created with your mind and i don't believe in it.
you might get dis-motivated but that's a different story, its just a human nature / cycle and this will inevitably happens (even in pre-clinical).
again, i am not disagreeing with you here, i think for some people it would be pointless just going to medical school if they have no intention in becoming a doctor. but what i am saying is that you can go and do a medical degree because you like it and decide that you don't want to be doctor the end. but just because you decided not to be a doctor at the end doesn't mean that it was wasted 6 years because it wasn't... even if you want to become a full time researcher at the end, you will become a much better researcher because you went through this experience.

ahh cba {quoting 3rd para)
most definitely, you will need a fair idea or plan about what you want to do with your life. but this comes naturally doesn;t it. if you look deep enough, there is something that you are naturally inclined towards, something that you are really passionate about, so you do it.
i took my a-levels because for me my passion is science so i took science subjects. similarly, i hate expressing art subjects so i didn't chose it.

at the moment i have no doubts, that i will change my mind and go into a career in expressing arts. still, if i do want to go and do say art (highly unlikely haha), then still not taking a single expressing art subjects at a-level ins't going to stop me.

but this doesn't mean that i hate all the subjects that i din't chose, eg, i like french and want to learn the language eventually, but i don't need a qualification for me to like french and speak it, so that's why i din;t take french.

[quoting 4th paragraph]
some unis offer mb/phd, so if i am lucky enough to get in one of the university i will do it. it's just means that you do your clinicals as well as a phd at the same time, and so instead of taking 3 years after your pre-clinical, it will take you 6 years before you graduate. however, you end up with MBBS and a PHD, excluding the extra knowledge you gain.
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Okorange
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#42
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You'll need to apply to those programs after getting into medicine first. If you are truly interested in these programs you should consider involving yourself in research sometime between now and your application time.
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DrAdrenaline
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#43
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(Original post by Okorange)
You'll need to apply to those programs after getting into medicine first. If you are truly interested in these programs you should consider involving yourself in research sometime between now and your application time.
yeh, i am applying to 'nuffield foundation research placement' to see whats it like and go from there... just need to focus more on my studies tho.
+once i get in i will obv. do a intercalated BSc and see where it takes me.
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digitalis
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(Original post by swopnil)
load of tosh
Crikey.

In nine years of TSR, I have never experienced anything like that. Phew!

For future reference, a quick glance at a poster's signature will tell you where they are up to in the application cycle.

Now, must go off and find some meditation and deep introspection resources. Think I'll dig out that MBBS certificate and use it as a bookmark...
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Democracy
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#45
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(Original post by digitalis)
Crikey.

In nine years of TSR, I have never experienced anything like that. Phew!

For future reference, a quick glance at a poster's signature will tell you where they are up to in the application cycle.

Now, must go off and find some meditation and deep introspection resources. Think I'll dig out that MBBS certificate and use it as a bookmark...
http://www.flamewarriorsguide.com/wa.../therapist.htm

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shiggydiggy
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#46
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Lmao.

Oh, you guys.
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PurpleMonkey123
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#47
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Quick off topic question:

Do you do Biochemistry labs? And if so what do they involve you to do?

Or does medical school mostly focus on Biochemistry lectures?

Also how in depth do you learn statistics?

Thanks!
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Democracy
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(Original post by PurpleMonkey123)
Quick off topic question:

Do you do Biochemistry labs? And if so what do they involve you to do?

Or does medical school mostly focus on Biochemistry lectures?

Also how in depth do you learn statistics?

Thanks!
Never set foot in a lab during medical school, yeah, biochem is taught at lectures and at much less depth than in a biomed degree etc.

Stats is minimal too.

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PurpleMonkey123
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#49
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(Original post by Democracy)
Never set foot in a lab during medical school, yeah, biochem is taught at lectures and at much less depth than in a biomed degree etc.

Stats is minimal too.

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Ah thank you for the clarification. I did pharmacy as a degree and there was a LOT of biochem labs/practicals in my first 2 years which I wasn't fond of.

I only ask as I'm planning on applying for 2016 GEM and would like to have an idea of "heads up" of the sort of things that I may do regarding topics I don't particularly like/are confident with
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Democracy
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#50
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(Original post by PurpleMonkey123)
Ah thank you for the clarification. I did pharmacy as a degree and there was a LOT of biochem labs/practicals in my first 2 years which I wasn't fond of.

I only ask as I'm planning on applying for 2016 GEM and would like to have an idea of "heads up" of the sort of things that I may do regarding topics I don't particularly like/are confident with
You'll find med school biochem etc a piece of piss if you've done a pharmacy degree!

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nexttime
  • Volunteer Team
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#51
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#51
(Original post by PurpleMonkey123)
Quick off topic question:

Do you do Biochemistry labs? And if so what do they involve you to do?

Or does medical school mostly focus on Biochemistry lectures?

Also how in depth do you learn statistics?

Thanks!
We did a decent amount of biochem labs, as well as genetics, physiology, microbiology etc. Med schools vary a lot.

AS a potential GEM i doubt any school would have much emphasis on basic lab work though. Those courses are more to-the-point, assuming you have basic science etc skills already.
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Zorg
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#52
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(Original post by PurpleMonkey123)
Ah thank you for the clarification. I did pharmacy as a degree and there was a LOT of biochem labs/practicals in my first 2 years which I wasn't fond of.

I only ask as I'm planning on applying for 2016 GEM and would like to have an idea of "heads up" of the sort of things that I may do regarding topics I don't particularly like/are confident with
Speaking to a few GEM schools, labs seem to be the first thing to go when truncating a course. They're great for learning if you're a hands on sort of person but very inefficient for the amount you learn in the given time.
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°_°
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Not much probably. My GP is so incompetent. I bet I would make a better GP than her!

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Hype en Ecosse
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#54
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(Original post by °_°)
Not much probably. My GP is so incompetent. I bet I would make a better GP than her!

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I'm sure you would, mate.

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shiggydiggy
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#55
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(Original post by °_°)
Not much probably. My GP is so incompetent. I bet I would make a better GP than her!

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My money is this being another classical case of 'there was nothing wrong with me, so I'm mad at my doctor'.
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