How to get better at maths. Watch

Smaug123
  • Study Helper
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#41
Report 4 years ago
#41
(Original post by MathMeister)
You've got to admit the stuff you come up with is funny bro.
Thank you, I suppose.
0
reply
Aria Enoshima
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#42
Report 4 years ago
#42
(Original post by Smaug123)
Maths at A-level is not maths at uni. Maths at A-level is like learning to spell; maths at uni is like learning to write a novel.
Welp, this makes GCSE look like ummm, finger painting?
0
reply
Smaug123
  • Study Helper
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#43
Report 4 years ago
#43
(Original post by Aria Enoshima)
Welp, this makes GCSE look like ummm, finger painting?
Learning how to form letters.
0
reply
Aria Enoshima
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#44
Report 4 years ago
#44
(Original post by Smaug123)
Learning how to form letters.
Suppose that makes sense, although I still haven't fully learnt that (My handwriting is amazingly bad)
0
reply
Smaug123
  • Study Helper
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#45
Report 4 years ago
#45
(Original post by Aria Enoshima)
Suppose that makes sense, although I still haven't fully learnt that (My handwriting is amazingly bad)
I am correspondingly hopeless at mechanics. It's analogous to my having a particular loathing for the letter "t".
0
reply
Aria Enoshima
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#46
Report 4 years ago
#46
(Original post by Smaug123)
I am correspondingly hopeless at mechanics. It's analogous to my having a particular loathing for the letter "t".
lol, whenever i write (which isn't so often since i do all my work on laptop now) I have to go through and make sure my 'i's don't look like 'l's. We all have these silly things we suck at, its whats make us human (look at me being philosophical and such)
0
reply
ETRC
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#47
Report 4 years ago
#47
(Original post by MathMeister)
Offence taken - you don't know me ahaha. Btw the average for A level maths and Fmaths is not an A*...
...Do you mean average on tsr?
Of course I will get into a good uni.
I'm better than bang average, average and maybe a few of the levels above... Don't come accusing me of being average.
No I'm not deluded- I'm confident in my ability.
Just do STEP papers then if you are so good. When you get stuck on a question, you might actually see that you are not that great at maths as you claim to be.
And if you bother learning the proofs of A-level maths, you will see that you actually understand a lot of it and can manipulate it pretty well.
In Uni you will not fully understand what you learn and some things might be too hard for you know know why it actually works.
0
reply
rayquaza17
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#48
Report 4 years ago
#48
(Original post by poorform)
I'm currently a 1st year undergrad and I feel like my mathematical ability is very poor (this is a euphemism for absolute dog ****).
I want to get better at a lot of different areas so I can feel very comfortable with mathematics.
I see people on here and other places who know a great deal and have excellent intuition when it comes to solving difficult problems. (DFranklin TenEem Smaug Noble......)
Obviously this comes from a lot of experience but is there anything I can do to try and get myself into that category I want to be in.

I'm trying to do all my work for uni but it just isn't giving me full understanding and I want to be able to look at some really complicated questions and be able to understand and solve them.

Thanks.


I wouldn't worry about feeling like your maths ability is poor in comparison to the great mathematicians of TSR you mentioned - I'm in second year and I feel incredibly stupid compared to them!

You obviously don't have a poor maths ability if you're made it to first year mathematics! And just remember the more you learn now, the better you're getting at maths. So this time next year, you can be like me and understand around 5% of what the people you mentioned say!

My best advice would be to try doing your best in the modules you are currently doing at uni. If you feel like you aren't getting complete understanding of the topics, it might be because you need to learn other things first and then your course will return to what you're doing now at a later time and build upon it.

(Original post by Smaug123)
I am correspondingly hopeless at mechanics. It's analogous to my having a particular loathing for the letter "t".
In all seriousness though, why do lecturers choose the combination of letters "bj" when describing like a sequence?
0
reply
Smaug123
  • Study Helper
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#49
Report 4 years ago
#49
(Original post by rayquaza17)
I wouldn't worry about feeling like your maths ability is poor in comparison to the great mathematicians of TSR you mentioned - I'm in second year and I feel incredibly stupid compared to them!
To be clear, I'm not one of the great mathematicians of TSR :P nonexclusively DFranklin, davros and Lord of the Flies are, as far as I can tell, leagues beyond me in knowledge, while people like DFranklin, davros, TenOfThem are considerably better teachers than I am. (In fairness, I've not had much practice.)

In all seriousness though, why do lecturers choose the combination of letters "bj" when describing like a sequence?
It's almost like they were engaging in some sort of pun, or play on words.
0
reply
MathMeister
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#50
Report 4 years ago
#50
(Original post by Smaug123)
To be clear, I'm not one of the great mathematicians of TSR :P nonexclusively DFranklin, davros and Lord of the Flies are, as far as I can tell, leagues beyond me in knowledge, while people like DFranklin, davros, TenOfThem are considerably better teachers than I am. (In fairness, I've not had much practice.)
Astruser is a good teacher when it comes to concepts
0
reply
TheBBQ
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#51
Report 4 years ago
#51
I feel like this when it comes to the new approach of linear algebra and vector spaces and so on

Sometimes I feel like I'm reading a load of tosh when it comes to reading the textbooks or when someone is telling me sometihng. Just keep going over it! Don't give up!

Honestly though, it isn't meant to be easy I think.
0
reply
rayquaza17
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#52
Report 4 years ago
#52
(Original post by TheBBQ)
I feel like this when it comes to the new approach of linear algebra and vector spaces and so on

Sometimes I feel like I'm reading a load of tosh when it comes to reading the textbooks or when someone is telling me sometihng. Just keep going over it! Don't give up!

Honestly though, it isn't meant to be easy I think.
I'm doing lin alg and vector spaces atm. This is my face constantly in those lectures: :eek:/
:lolwut:
(Original post by Smaug123)
To be clear, I'm not one of the great mathematicians of TSR :P nonexclusively DFranklin, davros and Lord of the Flies are, as far as I can tell, leagues beyond me in knowledge, while people like DFranklin, davros, TenOfThem are considerably better teachers than I am. (In fairness, I've not had much practice.)
Don't be so modest!
0
reply
TheBBQ
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#53
Report 4 years ago
#53
(Original post by rayquaza17)
I'm doing lin alg and vector spaces atm. This is my face constantly in those lectures: :eek:/
:lolwut:
I'm only first year though! but i do half physics.. So I apparently get the brutal side of both programmes for the first year!

All this different notation does my head in too.
0
reply
davros
  • Study Helper
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#54
Report 4 years ago
#54
(Original post by Smaug123)
To be clear, I'm not one of the great mathematicians of TSR :P nonexclusively DFranklin, davros and Lord of the Flies are, as far as I can tell, leagues beyond me in knowledge, while people like DFranklin, davros, TenOfThem are considerably better teachers than I am. (In fairness, I've not had much practice.)
My knowledge is extremely rusty these days - I trust myself on the A level pure stuff because it's ingrained in my consciousness through years of practice, but not having practised applied maths for over 20 years I'm very selective about offering help on things like Stats and Mechanics. I also tend to be very careful about offering help on the undergrad stuff - having done it before I can often see what the point of the question is, which is one of the battles fresh undergraduates face, but I can't reliably remember the mechanics of solving most of the problems, and since it's vitally important to be careful when constructing proofs I tend to leave the advice to more recent graduates or current students who are more "in the zone".

Also, I certainly wouldn't describe myself as a good "teacher". I mean I'm OK hiding behind the anonymity of the internet, but if I had to stand up in front of a class of hooligans who were throwing chairs at me and calling me a c**t then I'd probably have a nervous breakdown!

(And let's be honest, most of the people who come on TSR are people who genuinely want to learn as opposed to being forced to do it against their will.)
0
reply
MSI_10
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#55
Report 4 years ago
#55
Math is like martial arts. What you can learn from reading is very limited and by only practising until you master techniques will you even start to scratch the surface.
0
reply
sarah_j_jane
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#56
Report 4 years ago
#56
Learn how to think mathematically and logically. It's just problem solving. (Obviously you'll need to learn the methods too) but it will help

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
1374786
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#57
Report 4 years ago
#57
Is anyone good at mechanics?

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=3005989
0
reply
DFranklin
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#58
Report 4 years ago
#58
(Original post by ThatPerson)
I don't have experience with undergraduate mathematics, but I'm sure there is some rote-learning of proofs for exams.
In general, having to learn proofs by rote is a bad sign (there are some exceptions). It means you don't really understand how the proof works - if you did, you'd just need to remember a key idea.

E.g. Intermediate value theorem. Key idea: \sup \{x : f(x) < 0 \} is the crossover point.
Rank-Nullity theorem: take a basis for \text{ker }\alpha and extend it.
Lagrange theorem: The cosets all have size equal to the subgroup and they partition G.
0
reply
around
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#59
Report 4 years ago
#59
(Original post by DFranklin)
In general, having to learn proofs by rote is a bad sign (there are some exceptions). It means you don't really understand how the proof works - if you did, you'd just need to remember a key idea.

E.g. Intermediate value theorem. Key idea: \sup \{x : f(x) < 0 \} is the crossover point.
Rank-Nullity theorem: take a basis for \text{ker }\alpha and extend it.
Lagrange theorem: The cosets all have size equal to the subgroup and they partition G.
Counterexamples (off the top of my head, from when I did UG maths):

Hilbert's Basis Theorem
Quadratic reciprocity
Kantorovich-Rubenstein Theorem
Beck's monadicity theorem
Special Adjoint Functor Theorem (the general one is a doddle, in comparison)
Most of the Sylow theorems

I mean, yeah, most of them have some kind of key idea, but it's still not trivial to derive the full proof from that idea.
0
reply
Enigma Machine
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#60
Report 4 years ago
#60
Understanding, and practice.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Cardiff Metropolitan University
    Undergraduate Open Day - Llandaff Campus Undergraduate
    Sat, 27 Apr '19
  • University of East Anglia
    Could you inspire the next generation? Find out more about becoming a Primary teacher with UEA… Postgraduate
    Sat, 27 Apr '19
  • Anglia Ruskin University
    Health, Education, Medicine and Social Care; Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences; Business and Law; Science and Engineering Undergraduate
    Sat, 27 Apr '19

Have you registered to vote?

Yes! (541)
37.73%
No - but I will (112)
7.81%
No - I don't want to (97)
6.76%
No - I can't vote (<18, not in UK, etc) (684)
47.7%

Watched Threads

View All