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    Others have said already how important it is to be going out, not just for the sake of emotions but you actually do need the sun, the freedom (to an extent), the experience of 'facing the world'. Being trapped at home is a horrible feeling and it's pretty hard to get out of voluntarily. So perhaps you can look at getting a job or starting the gym, or maybe going to a sports club, or a musical instrument class.. something that'll take your mind of anxiety and such. It's the first few steps that'l' be the hardest, the rest will get easier
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    Maybe you could try easing yourself outside very carefully, and start by just walking around the block. Build it up to walking around a park, visiting the corner shop, going to the supermarket, getting on public transport etc. Then you can control the build up to what you feel comfortable with
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    #1

    (Original post by SA-1)
    It's the first few steps that'l' be the hardest, the rest will get easier

    (Original post by Suzanne123)
    Maybe you could try easing yourself outside very carefully, and start by just walking around the block. Build it up to walking around a park, visiting the corner shop, going to the supermarket, getting on public transport etc. Then you can control the build up to what you feel comfortable with
    Yeah I think you're right about the staggering things hopefully that way I won't get so overwhelmed. Thanks
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Yeah I think you're right about the staggering things hopefully that way I won't get so overwhelmed. Thanks
    Best of luck
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    I didn't leave the house for 3 months due to anxiety, depression, insomnia etc. therapy is really helpful if you can find the right person. Don't feel too stressed if it isn't working out with your first therapist etc. ☺️
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    (Original post by MeerkatSwag)
    I didn't leave the house for 3 months due to anxiety, depression, insomnia etc. therapy is really helpful if you can find the right person. Don't feel too stressed if it isn't working out with your first therapist etc. ☺️
    Hi, do not get me started on insomnia 😒. Really compounds my issues, without enough sleep I feel like a leaf so instead of tackling my problems I try to top up on sleep. Yeah on waiting lists for therapy at the moment. So was it the therapy that helped you overcome it or did you take meds or anything as well?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Hi, do not get me started on insomnia 😒. Really compounds my issues, without enough sleep I feel like a leaf so instead of tackling my problems I try to top up on sleep. Yeah on waiting lists for therapy at the moment. So was it the therapy that helped you overcome it or did you take meds or anything as well?
    I am taking medication also, however I am sensitive to medicine so not many things are working. Therapy itself got me out of the house (to attend my appointment) and the first thing they did was ask me what my favourite things to do outside are. And then they convinced me (took a good few sessions) to go and do one of the activities I mentioned (mine was take my dog for a walk). After that they slowly worked with me to do more 'out there' activities like go shopping or back to my sports training and gym. It helps if you find the right person

    Insomnia sucks. If you go down the medication route stress about your poor sleeping pattern and they'll hopefully prescribe something for that too along with antidepressants.

    If you can afford it, I advise going private. Just because you're on a waiting list it doesn't mean your issues aren't something that needs to be dealt with as soon as possible. I was put on a waiting list then I got admitted into hospital for doing something stupid (that I had been doing the whole time and the mental health clinic were aware of) and I was given an appointment within a few days.

    I hope it works out for you
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    It's always the negative emotional response, once strong enough, that stops us from doing. Once we make ourselves feel bad enough we will naturally stop ourselves from that thing that we are feeling bad about.

    Ie. If we were to put our hand in a fire, the immense pain feeling would ensure that we would never do that again.

    This, is a very useful thing or course, to be able to remember these pains.... Whether they are physical or emotional pains.

    The problem starts, however, when the emotional response (the pain eg. fear) stops us in ways that are less than helpful etc.,. This is when they become limiting and, in the case of trauma's, phobias or focussed repetitive negative thinking, they can be VERY limiting.

    If this is about a strong negative emotional response due to repetitive thinking around keeping healthy (safe/clean) etc... then there are techniques available that can help you take back control of your thinking if you wish for that.

    Take care.
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    (Original post by Jayne7)
    If this is about a strong negative emotional response due to repetitive thinking around keeping healthy (safe/clean) etc... then there are techniques available that can help you take back control of your thinking if you wish for that.
    Yeah thanks you are right, but I've had stress in my life for so long I feel like I don't have any good places in my mind or environment to go to so I'm in a horrible cycle. Just not really sure where to start. Thanks though
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Yeah thanks you are right, but I've had stress in my life for so long I feel like I don't have any good places in my mind or environment to go to so I'm in a horrible cycle. Just not really sure where to start. Thanks though
    Hi, I have been like this. I was too afraid to do normal things like run, go shopping, attend appointments etc. All from fear, anxiety, stress. I broke the habit with small steps. First, I gathered up a pile of unworn clothes and walked down to the local supermarket to recycle them (if this sounds like something you would want to do, maybe google your nearest clothes bank). Not only was it great to get out of the house and face that fear, but it further felt good to do something positive outside. Then I gradually started jogging three times a week with the Couch to 5k app. I would recommend setting small positive goals like that to help you tackle your fears. All the best!
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    (Original post by AntiLearner)
    Hi, I have been like this. I was too afraid to do normal things like run, go shopping, attend appointments etc. All from fear, anxiety, stress. I broke the habit with small steps. First, I gathered up a pile of unworn clothes and walked down to the local supermarket to recycle them (if this sounds like something you would want to do, maybe google your nearest clothes bank). Not only was it great to get out of the house and face that fear, but it further felt good to do something positive outside. Then I gradually started jogging three times a week with the Couch to 5k app. I would recommend setting small positive goals like that to help you tackle your fears. All the best!
    Thanks for that, you've done really well as well should be proud
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Thanks for that, you've done really well as well should be proud
    You can only eat an elephant one bite at a time... you can only climb a ladder one step at a time..... You can do this.... one step at a time. You can see it can be done from this last quote... you can do it too... little bit by little bit you can change.

    Remembering this is about 'good feelings' that will help you become stronger (I'm talking this way as I'm also a coach).... Think of something that you enjoy, what makes you feel good... even a lovely stretch in the morning. Force yourself to feel these feelings more.... good funny videos etc.... Remember what you like to do (riding bike / beach etc) but mostly remember those feelings and make yourself feel those feelings... Every time you go back to negative thoughts/feelings be aware, stop yourself and force yourself to remember the good things. It's important also to give yourself a big tick (and FEEL GOOD) at every achievement (however big/small).

    It's important that you make a commitment to improve your internal world (your mind) first and foremost..... the external world (environment) will finally follow.... And I can help and support you more professionally if you wish... Its a journey and may be tough. Focus, be determined, and you will do it.... one step at a time!
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    Sorry to hear this, I do know how you feel. I rarely go out of the house- I have OCD, depression, anxiety and PTSD. I have been trying to go to the gym but over the past few days it's just got too much. Been signed off as not fit for work since November.

    Thinking of you!
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    (Original post by Jayne7)
    And I can help and support you more professionally if you wish...
    Do you mean I can PM you or do you mean you provide some kind of fee charging coaching service?
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    When I was 14 I did not leave the house for 8 months, due to high social anxiety and depression.

    Now, the most I go without going out is 5 days. It makes me feel rubbish to be honest.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I haven't left the house since my last doctors appointment in October. I stopped leaving the house in May for various reasons and I'm waiting on therapy and other help.

    I just wondered if any of you have suffered from this kind of thing or know anyone else's experience whether for days, weeks, months or even years and if they've managed to overcome it what helped? Also just general tips if you think they might be useful. One of the main reasons for my not leaving the house is health anxiety.

    My doctor said it's really rare for someone my age not to have left the house for this long which upset me but I've had a lot on and I know it's the weight of it all.

    Thanks in advance
    I have a friend who didn't leave the house due to anxiety for a long time. She wouldn't even come out of her room at points. These were anxiety issues that started when she was at school and followed her to mid/late twenties.

    She has since managed to break away from it and now has a job, goes on holiday, on trips etc. She has really overcome it. I can't recommend specifically how as I don't know much detail, but it will be very personal anyway. All I can recommend is attending your doctors appointments and not being worried (easy to say I know!) to seek help. It's not as unusual as you may think and certainly not something you should be embarrassed about. You just need the support to get there. For my friend it started off with little things like going to the local shop or for a walk down the street, and she really celebrated these, and that helped her move on to bigger stuff.

    xxx
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    When I was 14 I did not leave the house for 8 months, due to high social anxiety and depression.

    Now, the most I go without going out is 5 days. It makes me feel rubbish to be honest.
    Do you mean you feel rubbish at having to leave the house, or do you feel rubbish because you want to leave the house more often?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    When I was 14 I did not leave the house for 8 months, due to high social anxiety and depression.

    Now, the most I go without going out is 5 days. It makes me feel rubbish to be honest.
    Do you mind me asking, why do you sometimes go for 5 days without leaving now? Because you still struggle with it, or just because you don't really have anything to do?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I haven't left the house since my last doctors appointment in October. I stopped leaving the house in May for various reasons and I'm waiting on therapy and other help.

    I just wondered if any of you have suffered from this kind of thing or know anyone else's experience whether for days, weeks, months or even years and if they've managed to overcome it what helped? Also just general tips if you think they might be useful. One of the main reasons for my not leaving the house is health anxiety.

    My doctor said it's really rare for someone my age not to have left the house for this long which upset me but I've had a lot on and I know it's the weight of it all.

    Thanks in advance
    What do you mean you do not leave the house? How do you get food how do you pay rent and bills? If you mean you only leave for work and grocery shop then I know what you mean I hate going outside I feel unsafe in case anything happened I feel like the house is safe and no one can hurt me. Maybe try go grocery shopping and find a new hobby like cooking or some sport or meet up with a family memeber or friend for tea or coffee or sign up to a sports club.
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    (Original post by Maria1812)
    What do you mean you do not leave the house? How do you get food how do you pay rent and bills? If you mean you only leave for work and grocery shop then I know what you mean I hate going outside I feel unsafe in case anything happened I feel like the house is safe and no one can hurt me. Maybe try go grocery shopping and find a new hobby like cooking or some sport or meet up with a family memeber or friend for tea or coffee or sign up to a sports club.

    I would assume OP lives with parents - though you don't have to leave the house to do any of the things you listed.

    Maybe on disability benefits and can pay all bills online, order shopping online etc. May even be working! There are work from home jobs.
 
 
 
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