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    Hmm. On one hand, I like the idea of LGBT people being able to go to school without fear of being bullied, but also, the whole segregation idea seems ominous to me - it seems to be avoiding the bullying issue, not tackling it.
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    (Original post by samba)
    I'm on the fence too; everybody should feel safe and secure in who they are at school, but unless they are having lessons on how to handle abuse, they will handle it worse once they leave. I'm also unsure as to the cost, and why it needs to be an LGBT school when one for mental health in general is so badly needed. I wouldn't be against it though, better than them being bullied.

    And the young boys would get an early taste of the promiscuity culture in the gay world....



    A year at the school, which will be funded by the government, will cost £16,000, the same as other specialist schools. But Lee claims that the charity is saving other council services about £1.3m through early intervention and support for struggling children.
    YES. Completely agree with this. It would stop so much of the misunderstanding and create a far more inclusive atmosphere for those who are struggling.

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    I both agree and disagree with this. As a member of the LGBT community, I think it would've been a great environment for an LGBT to find themselves in but at the same time, social issues with regards to the LGBT community will be tackled only if the rest of society (ie straight people and the like) actively partake in raising awareness and combating bullying and homophobia, so campaigning in mainstream schools should be an area of very strong focus.B

    But at the same time, I don't see why this shouldn't be something like an alternative, operating in the same spirit as Women's colleges in America I suppose
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    I worry this would lead to further segregation and prevent acceptance in society.
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    We need to have separate schools for every ethnic minority too in case there is racial bullying.

    *sarcasm*
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    Honestly the money ought to be invested in educational programs to make current schoolchildren less homophobic and more open to the "you do what you do, I do what I do" philosophy. Not only would LGBT kids from said schools likely be picked on outside of class by other kids, but they'd also grow up in a bubble where no one is homophobic, and you can only shield them from hate for so long.

    Additionally, LGBT people make up something like 2% of the population, so again, I don't think it is a good use of money.
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    We've already tried separate but equal and it didn't quite work out.
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    Yes, I think this is a great way to encourage impressionable heterosexual adolescents to treat LGBT's equally.
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    Eh, I can understand their principle of wanting to create a safe space for LGBT teens, but at the same time it really doesn't help the LGBT community in that if it became more commonplace, then you'd have a culture of "ooh, you're different, you're LGBT".

    I do like the idea of it having part-time places though. Whilst I never personally felt like I needed to be away from mainstream school due to my sexuality (I was not the first to come out at my school, and the reactions to the other LGBT students was positive), I can see the appeal in allowing a student to spend a few days a week with other people "like them", and still being able to stay in education.

    Reading the article though, it does have hints of simply being a state school that is more flexible to needs of students ("including young carers, young parents and those with mental health problems"), which is definitely an excellent idea.
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    No. I have experienced way too segregation as an autistic student at high school so if I'd ever do high school again, I would rather socialise with straight students and tell some of those stupid enough to use the word "gay" as substitute for lame to shut up.
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    (Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
    A school for LGBT pupils is planned for Manchester.

    "This is about saving lives,” said Amelia Lee, strategic director for LGBT Youth North West, the youth work charity behind the plans. “Despite the laws that claim to protect gay people from homophobic bullying, the truth is that in schools especially, bullying is still incredibly common and causes young people to feel isolated and alienated, which often leads to truanting and, in the worst-case scenarios, to suicide.”

    "The school will be specifically designed for LGBT young people who are struggling in mainstream schools, but will be open to other children, including young carers, young parents and those with mental health problems. “It will be LGBT-inclusive, but not exclusive,” said Lee."


    Is segregating pupils the right solution, or should we be focusing attention on eliminating homophobia from mainstream schools?
    Homophobia elimination
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    This isn't a good idea in my opinion. Not all LGBT people experience bullying, I know that at my school people who have come out have had positive reactions, obviously this isn't the case everywhere, but the horrendous bullying that some people experience is not necessarily the norm either. Also, some white, cisgender, heterosexual people experience awful bullying. We need to make safe places for all people who are victims of bullying, regardless of who they are and what their circumstances are, we need to consider individuals, not labels, anyone can be unhappy, and feel alone or discriminated against, and that needs to be recognised.
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    (Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
    A school for LGBT pupils is planned for Manchester.

    "This is about saving lives,” said Amelia Lee, strategic director for LGBT Youth North West, the youth work charity behind the plans. “Despite the laws that claim to protect gay people from homophobic bullying, the truth is that in schools especially, bullying is still incredibly common and causes young people to feel isolated and alienated, which often leads to truanting and, in the worst-case scenarios, to suicide.”

    "The school will be specifically designed for LGBT young people who are struggling in mainstream schools, but will be open to other children, including young carers, young parents and those with mental health problems. “It will be LGBT-inclusive, but not exclusive,” said Lee."


    Is segregating pupils the right solution, or should we be focusing attention on eliminating homophobia from mainstream schools?
    I used to go to a state school that was actually quite prestigious, but it was also homophobic, and quite frankly ****ing awful. At that moment in time, I would have rather had went to an LGBT school just to at least feel welcome, comfortable, relaxed and at-home somewhere. However, this has difficult implications. Firstly, I was not out at that point, and my parents would not have been supportive of my sexuality. I imagine that for many, their family would not want them to attend an LGBT school.

    Fast forward to now. I attend a private school which is the most supportive place I could imagine. In fact, I never thought I could ever feel so comfortable in a school. The thing is, it's not really that hard to challenge homophobia. The key aspects of my school that make it so welcoming are that:

    - There are popular teachers who everyone knows are gay/lesbian and have been quite open about it. All the girls find this one male teacher really hot, so when they asked him if he had a girlfriend he replied, "I don't have a girlfriend, but I have a boyfriend!" This breaks down the stigma of being gay.

    - The Pupil Council made a bullying policy which explicitly states that homophobia will not be tolerated, including the use of the word "gay" in a negative way.

    - We have Stonewall's "That's so gay…let's be honest, it's probably not" posters up, which are brilliant. In addition, a lot of teachers, many of whom are straight, have rainbow flags in their classrooms to show solidarity to LGBT pupils. This makes it feel like you're actually welcome in the school and that teachers have your back!

    - This is a really important one - teachers don't feel awkward talking about LGBT. One of my female straight teachers was talking about how awful it must be to be transgender in prison with our class. I can't imagine a teacher having that discussion at my old school, they'd be way to embarrassed to even broach the subject.

    - There's a breakdown of the stigma of same sex relations. For example, a lot of straight guys hold each other for fun/affection, comment on each other's Facebook photos that they're cute, etc. Also, a lot of people express same-sex attraction even if they don't call themselves LGBT or come out. I can think of a few top male athletes in my school who like guys and don't hide it from their friends; one of the most popular girls in my year is bisexual as well. As you can imagine, if some popular, well respected people are gay, then it's not that intimidating to share your sexuality either.




    Went off on a bit of a tangent, but what I'm trying to say is that a school can be made less homophobic in some easy ways. All it takes is some determined management and willing teachers. If most of the pupils in the school are receptive, the others will usually follow. The LGBT school might be a quick fix, and yes, it might be necessary for those currently living hellish existences in rough schools, but it's going to prevent assimilation and make gay people seem weirder and more outcast than they are perceived already.

    I say make a school for all the homophobes to attend. They're the ones who need excluded and segregated from the classroom - not those who are gay!
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    Make a school for homophobes instead!
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    I'm LGBT and I prefer being educated in a predominantly straight school. An LGBT school seems great, but at a high cost and the novelty would soon die out.

    I admit that accidental homophobic comments are quite common in schools, but I do think being a minority inside a majority gives you a better understanding of people. You cope better with different people and respect differences more than the average person would.

    Plus I do think having a substantial amount of straight people around turns your head away from crushes and relationships, and more onto friendships and education. I think that if I was thrown into a LGBT school I'd be too busy having a complex love life than actually learning.

    And being LGBT is always something that makes you that little bit different in your friendship group!
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    (Original post by Blazar)
    You're not LGBT, are you?



    Sounds like you're not either.
    Tbh I agree re: the bullying being a part of school but not necessarily it toughening you up. Different people react to bullying in different ways

    In a lot of schools, its a "If you don't fit in with us, we hate you" sorts thing...
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    (Original post by converselove)
    As others have said, this won't work. The focus needs to be on better education to eradicate problems like homophobia and bullying.
    This is important.

    Some people forget that bigotry, whether it's racism, homophobia, sexism or whatever, is nearly always linked to poor education. The most vocal homophobes are those who know absolutely nothing about homosexuality - look at the anti-gay preachers in the USA and how stupid they are.
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    (Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
    A school for LGBT pupils is planned for Manchester.

    "This is about saving lives,” said Amelia Lee, strategic director for LGBT Youth North West, the youth work charity behind the plans. “Despite the laws that claim to protect gay people from homophobic bullying, the truth is that in schools especially, bullying is still incredibly common and causes young people to feel isolated and alienated, which often leads to truanting and, in the worst-case scenarios, to suicide.”

    "The school will be specifically designed for LGBT young people who are struggling in mainstream schools, but will be open to other children, including young carers, young parents and those with mental health problems. “It will be LGBT-inclusive, but not exclusive,” said Lee."


    Is segregating pupils the right solution, or should we be focusing attention on eliminating homophobia from mainstream schools?
    No certainly not, if they want to be fully accepted then it is vital for them to remain in a mainstream school where it should, realistically, be a diverse community. In this day and age everyone is accepted for who they are so segregating them would do no favours for them right?
    I mean, what about after education when they want to pursue a career and have no experience with homophobic and people who aren't particularly fond of them?

    As for the bullying, as all bullying is, it's pathetic and people just need to get over the segregated barrier between people. After all they're only human, no-one should have to accept bullying because of who they choose to be!
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    no because schools are for learning not for having sex
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    I've already give an opinion on this but some of the points after have been very good as well and only go to show this is a disaster waiting to happen.

    1. Trying to promote inclusion through segregation is as daft as trying to promote peace and respect through violence - you will not convince teenagers that those within the LGBT community are normal by segregating them and making them outcasts.

    2. We've already tried segregation in terms of special schools and these didn't work either.

    3. The legal issues are huge - if someone from an LGBT school applies for a job and is rejected will they then claim they've been discriminated against? Equally, they could be unfairly discriminated against and nobody would even know.

    4. Bullying will still happen outside of schools. If anything, concentrating homosexual pupils in large numbers just makes it easier.

    5. I see such schools as a target for homophobic religious fundamentalists (Islam and Christianity are both intolerant in this regard) - What is stopping an Anders Breivik type unleashing on the school knowing all/most pupils are LGBT?

    6. Everyone faces bullying - if you're not gay, you're fat. If you're not fat, you're ginger. If you're not ginger, you're a Muslim. If you're not Muslim, you're a Bible basher. If you're not a Bible basher, you're a geek. If you're not a geek, you're a hipster that tries too hard. If you're not a hipster that tries too hard, you're a goth. If you're not a goth, you're a freak....and it goes on and on and on. Children are mischievous, like to push boundaries and wind others up. This has always been the case.

    7. For years and years people have argued that the private/state system divide has led to class division. Arguably, it has and many agree that grammar schools go to close that gap somewhat.

    8. Legally, heterosexual children would have to be able to attend the school anyway otherwise its discrimination the other way just as heterosexual people are allowed to enter what are deemed 'gay bars' or 'gay clubs'.

    The money would be far better spent on employing support staff to deal with these issues within the schools that already exist.
 
 
 
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