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Which unis are best for students with anxiety? watch

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    (Original post by d41k57)
    Its terrible that happened at Durham, it's totally unlike my experience. I did my undergraduate and postgraduate studies there. I had some difficulties and used their counselling service. It was great for me, very supportive and really helped me deal with the issues I was having. The collegiate system was also great, colleges each have their own welfare teams, run by the students, with drop in hours and excellent formal pastoral systems. I work at Durham now and am part of the pastoral team in one of the colleges. I can honestly say that there is a real focus on student experience and support. Moreover the colleges have a fantastic range of clubs, societies and events (in addition to the university wide ones), it is definitely like having your own Durham family. Most colleges allocate their students mentors (the role I am involved in), so you will have a point of contact outside the formal hierarchy, in case you need someone to talk things over with. You also get college parents (students in higher years) who help get you orientated when you arrive and make you feel part of the community. Finally you will have a departmental tutor who is there to help with your academic and personal development. If your interested I'd definitely come to one of the open days.
    That all sounds really great! I'm just scared I won't get good enough grades to get into Durham, as the requirements are so high! But I'll give it a look anyway
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    (Original post by llacerta)
    Whilst I have never been diagnosed with anxiety, I have suffered from it in the past, and I found Royal Holloway to be very helpful- despite no 'official' diagnosis, even. Plus it's the sort of university that in and of itself tends to be a calming place; the small, pretty campus and great community mean that you have this feeling of safety and homeliness that larger, city-based universities struggle to emulate.

    I also agree with the suggestion of collegiate universities, though I'm not sure I'd recommend Oxford or Cambridge, despite the collegiate systems meaning that both have a strong community feel. I actually think the university (referring to Oxford here) is relatively poor at dealing with mental health issues, so other collegiate universities like Durham and York might be nice alternatives.
    Royal Holloway is definitely top of my list at the moment, I think
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    (Original post by sydneybridge)
    Going to Uni is probably one of the most stressful events you can think of.
    For someone with anxiety no University is going to be 'relaxing'.

    If you aren't already receiving treatment for your anxiety, you really do need to get on top of it BEFORE you even think of applying to Uni.
    First stop is your GP.
    I know it won't be relaxing, I'm not expecting that. Though I do think it will be an experience I will enjoy overall, and will be beneficial to my future.
    I've been receiving treatment for a number of years now, but thank you for your concern
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    Whatever the location university can be very stressful and can push some people over the edge. I would suggest if you have an official anxiety/MH diagnosis then apply for disabled students allowance (DSA). DSA can provide a bit of funding for extra support if you require it; a study skills tutor, mentoring, study buddy, etc. Also having DSA often facilitates easier arrangement coursework deadline extensions or sheltered exam conditions should you ever require them.

    People can give you their experience of each Uni but I think the only way to tell is to go and visit... making sure you go and meet the staff at the health and welfare service while you are there. My own experience is Coventry = Bad. Loughborough = Good.
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    (Original post by sydneybridge)
    Going to Uni is probably one of the most stressful events you can think of.
    For someone with anxiety no University is going to be 'relaxing'.

    If you aren't already receiving treatment for your anxiety, you really do need to get on top of it BEFORE you even think of applying to Uni.
    First stop is your GP.
    I see what you are getting at but I just I don't agree. A significant number of people with anxiety and MH problems will have a kind of condition that results in good days and bad days. It is not as simple as going to the GP getting a pill and having the problem 'fixed'; often the condition is chronic in nature. Yes university will be an additional stress and potential trigger, but that doesn't mean people should put their life on hold. I think it is most important to find the right course, the right university and not be too proud to ask for help if required. (help and reasonable adjustments that OP is legally entitled to btw).

    OP can have a plan as to how she will manage but until you get there it is impossible to really know how things will work out. If moving miles away from home it is important to make sure support is available if required.
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    (Original post by BigV)
    Whatever the location university can be very stressful and can push some people over the edge. I would suggest if you have an official anxiety/MH diagnosis then apply for disabled students allowance (DSA). DSA can provide a bit of funding for extra support if you require it; a study skills tutor, mentoring, study buddy, etc. Also having DSA often facilitates easier arrangement coursework deadline extensions or sheltered exam conditions should you ever require them.

    People can give you their experience of each Uni but I think the only way to tell is to go and visit... making sure you go and meet the staff at the health and welfare service while you are there. My own experience is Coventry = Bad. Loughborough = Good.
    Oh wow, I didn't know you could do that! I'll look into that
    Yeah, I'll be sure to go to open days and stuff!
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    (Original post by FreyaGreaves)
    I know it won't be relaxing, I'm not expecting that. Though I do think it will be an experience I will enjoy overall, and will be beneficial to my future.
    I've been receiving treatment for a number of years now, but thank you for your concern
    Yeah, I really wouldn't put too much weight on what he said (although I can understand where he's coming from.) I've had quite serious issues with anxiety and it's rarely impacted my work. When it has, however, both universities I've attended (I transferred) have been/were very helpful in helping me out. I know a few people on my course have had similar issues and have still been able to do well at university.
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    (Original post by FreyaGreaves)
    Royal Holloway is definitely top of my list at the moment, I think
    Just for the Founder's Building? You will barely notice it a few months in. What matters more is what the uni offers all round, the calibre of students, and the job prospects afterwards.
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    (Original post by Blitzkrieg15)
    Just for the Founder's Building? You will barely notice it a few months in. What matters more is what the uni offers all round, the calibre of students, and the job prospects afterwards.
    No, not just for the Founder's Building. I'm not stupid. And yep, I know that.
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    people seem to be suggesting universities in comparatively rural locations and perhaps that's sensible, I dunno. Another consideration, depending on the nature of the anxiety, should be models of teaching and assessment.

    A course delivered largely through nowhere-to-hide small seminar groups with a requirement that students give presentations and marks given for participation throughout the course mightn't suit someone having a social anxiety, for all that there are trees to be seen out the window. Equally, a course on which outcomes are wholly or largely dependent on performance in 3 hour closed-book exams would seem non-ideal for a person who doesn't do well under pressure.
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    (Original post by cambio wechsel)

    A course delivered largely through nowhere-to-hide small seminar groups with a requirement that students give presentations and marks given for participation throughout the course mightn't suit someone having a social anxiety, for all that there are trees to be seen out the window. Equally, a course on which outcomes are wholly or largely dependent on performance in 3 hour closed-book exams would seem non-ideal for a person who doesn't do well under pressure.
    This.

    Having any sort of MH crisis a long way from home surrounded by total strangers is an awful experience to go through. Dropping out of Uni because of MH is a further emotionally damaging experience that often takes years to get over.

    PLEASE think carefully upon the advice above
    Get your anxiety under control and then go to Uni.
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    (Original post by cambio wechsel)
    people seem to be suggesting universities in comparatively rural locations and perhaps that's sensible, I dunno. Another consideration, depending on the nature of the anxiety, should be models of teaching and assessment.

    A course delivered largely through nowhere-to-hide small seminar groups with a requirement that students give presentations and marks given for participation throughout the course mightn't suit someone having a social anxiety, for all that there are trees to be seen out the window. Equally, a course on which outcomes are wholly or largely dependent on performance in 3 hour closed-book exams would seem non-ideal for a person who doesn't do well under pressure.
    That's a very very good point to think about. Thanks
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    (Original post by FreyaGreaves)
    Yes, that's very true, haha. I'll definitely bear that in mind when applying!
    Durham is also collegiate, and I believe York is too - these will be a bit easier for an anxious person to handle as you'll live in a smaller college environment, rather than massive halls.

    I would also point out, though, that tailoring your whole life to suit your anxiety is not necessarily the best way to go - you need to challenge yourself and put yourself into uncomfortable situations so that you can begin to tackle the anxiety. University can be an excellent time to do that, but if you go with the attitude that you need to adapt everything to make life less anxiety-inducing for you, then it will be a missed opportunity.
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    just out of curiosity, why have so many people said Royal Holloway? I have a similar problem, I'm quite shy and quiet and get occasional social anxiety. I have applied to Royal Holloway as its so close to where I live.
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    I have a friend at Warwick who suffers from severe Aspergers of some sort, I've never asked for details, but I do know he was given an en-suite, and allocated in Bluebell, which is rather expensive but far removed from your typical student flats, each block only having 5 rooms, with their own laundry rooms. He was also afforded the privilege of a small fridge in his room. He'll also be spending every year on campus, so his process for accommodation is fairly straight forward. I'm sure he has a councillor of some sort too. So if you're interested in Warwick I'm sure you'll have plenty of support, and societies are a massive thing here so you can take socialising and developing friendships at your own pace. Good luck.
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    (Original post by Antifazian)
    Durham is also collegiate, and I believe York is too - these will be a bit easier for an anxious person to handle as you'll live in a smaller college environment, rather than massive halls.

    I would also point out, though, that tailoring your whole life to suit your anxiety is not necessarily the best way to go - you need to challenge yourself and put yourself into uncomfortable situations so that you can begin to tackle the anxiety. University can be an excellent time to do that, but if you go with the attitude that you need to adapt everything to make life less anxiety-inducing for you, then it will be a missed opportunity.
    I definitely agree! I often find I tackle my anxiety best by facing it head on. I just need a little support along the way too
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    (Original post by Aristotle's' Disciple)
    I have a friend at Warwick who suffers from severe Aspergers of some sort, I've never asked for details, but I do know he was given an en-suite and fridge in his room, and allocated in Bluebell, which is rather expensive but far removed from your typical student flats, each block only having 5 rooms, with their own laundry rooms. He was also afforded the privilege of a small fridge in his room. He'll also be spending every year on campus, so his process for accommodation is fairly straight forward. I'm sure he has a councillor of some sort too. So if you're interested in Warwick I'm sure you'll have plenty of support, and societies are a massive thing here so you can take socialising and developing friendships at your own pace. Good luck.
    That sounds really good! I would definitely be interested in Warwick. The history course sounds excellent too from what I've heard and read. Thanks a lot
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    (Original post by cambio wechsel)
    people seem to be suggesting universities in comparatively rural locations and perhaps that's sensible, I dunno. Another consideration, depending on the nature of the anxiety, should be models of teaching and assessment.

    A course delivered largely through nowhere-to-hide small seminar groups with a requirement that students give presentations and marks given for participation throughout the course mightn't suit someone having a social anxiety, for all that there are trees to be seen out the window. Equally, a course on which outcomes are wholly or largely dependent on performance in 3 hour closed-book exams would seem non-ideal for a person who doesn't do well under pressure.
    Hmm, you could argue small doses of social interaction would be healthy for OP and others suffering from social anxiety. I don't think differentiating between universities based on marginally different styles of teaching will help much as that will largely depend on the course itself. Studying at a Business school of any sort will require much more interaction than Maths at any university.

    Just my opinion but I genuinely think it would be better to pick a course which doesn't completely shelter you. The majority of us don't have the luxury of staying in academia forever and it's best to prepare yourself step by step.

    EDIT: Rather, don't pick a university based on the fact the course will shelter you from interaction. :p:
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    Birmingham has been very good in my experience. I started to suffer quite badly from anxiety towards the end of my first year, but could sense that something wasn't right before then and registered for counselling. My first experience wasn't great because I didn't click with the counsellor so I stopped seeing her after 2 sessions, but in second year when everything got a whole lot worse I registered for support again and was first referred to the Wellbeing service, who are more about practical solutions than talking therapy, who referred me to counselling because they thought I needed it. It took a while for that referral to come through (and I managed to somehow miss an email about an appointment which delayed things further) but once it did, I was able to say that I didn't want to see the same counsellor, and I got assigned to someone else. She was great, and by the end of second year I was much better, although it still affected my exam results because I'd struggled to revise properly. She arranged for me to see someone to sort out Disabled Students Allowance and a student support agreement, which I'm thankful for - the DSA funds a study skills mentor for me but there are a large range of things it can fund, and the student support agreement means I get extra time for exams (although I don't use it half the time, just having it makes me less anxious about the exams) and if I need an extension to a deadline it won't be questioned so much. I eventually stopped seeing my counsellor in my third year because I felt like we were covering the same ground in every session and I'd got as much out of it as I was going to, and from then on I continued to get better on my own.

    From what I can tell, many universities are helpful when it comes to mental health stuff, and it's a lot easier to access support through your university than it is through the NHS. For things like DSA and support arrangements though you'll need a proper diagnosis because they need medical evidence before they'll give you those. Universities want you to do well so while they can't increase your marks because of things like this, they can adjust things - like extra time, increasing the weighting of some assessments, etc - to make it possible for you to reach your potential.
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    No one has explained why Royal Holloway is the best.
 
 
 
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