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    (Original post by solarplexus)
    do you know how hard it is to get medicine (especially at KCL)?

    I would say Medicine at KCL is more prestigious (harder to get into, higher entry requirements, interview process, longer degree).
    It is ridiculously hard to get into LSE economics too. Very high entry standard as there is a huge international demand for it.

    The application success rate is low. It is a small school with a small intake. KCL Medicine programme is large. More over it even has the EMDP programme.

    LSE economics is more as premier as Oxbridge economics more than one can claim KCL medicine is as prremier as Oxbridge medicine.
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    (Original post by solarplexus)
    LSE > KCL...overall rep

    However a degree from KCL in medicine or dentistry is more reputed than a degree in 'economic history' or 'management' or 'geography' from LSE
    This is a silly comment, and immature. Students apply to their courses for a reason, and if they wanted to do Medicine they would have gone for it. LSE as an institution is more prestigious than KCL, but to then degrade it for not offering Medicine like KCL is ludicrous.

    Pre-2000 KCL asked for ABB/AAB to get in, with no GMAT/UKAT. Plus there were far fewer medical school places back then. Now you need AAA/A*AA just to stand a chance, plus the tests and interview on top.

    Every man and his dog gets A grades these days, thank goodness A Level exams are being made harder in 2017, back to how they were before Labour messed things up and dumbed them down so far that they are now easier than O Levels were.
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    (Original post by LutherVan)
    It is ridiculously hard to get into LSE economics too. Very high entry standard as there is a huge international demand for it.

    The application success rate is low. It is a small school with a small intake. KCL Medicine programme is large. More over it even has the EMDP programme.

    LSE economics is more as premier as Oxbridge economics more than one can claim KCL medicine is as prremier as Oxbridge medicine.
    (Original post by Blitzkrieg15)
    This is a silly comment, and immature. Students apply to their courses for a reason, and if they wanted to do Medicine they would have gone for it. LSE as an institution is more prestigious than KCL, but to then degrade it for not offering Medicine like KCL is ludicrous.

    Pre-2000 KCL asked for ABB/AAB to get in, with no GMAT/UKAT. Plus there were far fewer medical school places back then. Now you need AAA/A*AA just to stand a chance, plus the tests and interview on top.

    Every man and his dog gets A grades these days, thank goodness A Level exams are being made harder in 2017, back to how they were before Labour messed things up and dumbed them down so far that they are now easier than O Levels were.
    KCL medicine for me is more prestigious (this is my opinion)...

    I could have applied to economics if I didn't want to do medicine anyway....especially as LSE don't interview (kinda weird and easier for me seeing as you claim it to be better than oxbridge)....I know that I would probably have had a decent chance (got relevant work exp and could have done the extra reading)..

    I agree A grades are nothing significant....and they made it very easy for me to get 3A*s at a-level or maybe its just me.

    But I would be more impressed personally if I saw a Doctor from Oxbridge/Kings/UCL/ICL/Edinburgh than a guy with a degree in economics from LSE....that is just me though.....


    Lol just realized...did you honestly think I was degrading LSE for not doing medicine? Where did I say that previously? Im not that uninformed as you think...they are the london school of economics for a reason....haha
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    (Original post by solarplexus)
    KCL medicine for me is more prestigious (this is my opinion)...

    I could have applied to economics if I didn't want to do medicine anyway....especially as LSE don't interview (kinda weird and easier for me seeing as you claim it to be better than oxbridge)....I know that I would probably have had a decent chance (got relevant work exp and could have done the extra reading)..

    I agree A grades are nothing significant....and they made it very easy for me to get 3A*s at a-level or maybe its just me.

    But I would be more impressed personally if I saw a Doctor from Oxbridge/Kings/UCL/ICL/Edinburgh than a guy with a degree in economics from LSE....that is just me though.....


    Lol just realized...did you honestly think I was degrading LSE for not doing medicine? Where did I say that previously? Im not that uninformed as you think...they are the london school of economics for a reason....haha
    You have an ego problem. TSR wasn't meant for this kind of ****ty bragging or degrading. And A* is still an A grade, one which only 20% got pre-2000.

    Economics at LSE or Medicine at KCL are not something you can compare as they are both totally different. If you are clever enough to get into one, you would probably get into the other.
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    (Original post by solarplexus)

    I could have applied to economics if I didn't want to do medicine anyway....especially as LSE don't interview (kinda weird and easier for me seeing as you claim it to be better than oxbridge)....I know that I would probably have had a decent chance (got relevant work exp and could have done the extra reading)..

    I agree A grades are nothing significant....and they made it very easy for me to get 3A*s at a-level or maybe its just me.

    But I would be more impressed personally if I saw a Doctor from Oxbridge/Kings/UCL/ICL/Edinburgh than a guy with a degree in economics from LSE....that is just me though.....
    Umm, LSE's BSc in Economics requires a minimum of A*AA with an A* in Maths. The latest figures show that the program received 2,747 applicants for 211 places. The MSc in Economics requires a First with a strong background in Economics and Maths. It received 1,026 applications for 132 places. The MSc in Econometrics and Mathematical Economics requires the same qualifications and received 325 applications for 23 places. LSE's Department of Economics is widely viewed as the best outside the US. In short, perhaps you're not impressed, but applicants can only really claim to have a slight chance at these programs.
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    (Original post by War and Peace)
    Umm, LSE's BSc in Economics requires a minimum of A*AA with an A* in Maths. The latest figures show that the program received 2,747 applicants for 211 places. The MSc in Economics requires a First with a strong background in Economics and Maths. It received 1,026 applications for 132 places. The MSc in Econometrics and Mathematical Economics requires the same qualifications and received 325 applications for 23 places. LSE's Department of Economics is widely viewed as the best outside the US. In short, perhaps you're not impressed, but applicants can only really claim to have a slight chance at these programs.
    LSE Economics graduates tend to get very, very good jobs in the City, in journalism, and in the HM Treasury. So they have a very good earnings potential, far more than a low ranking doctor. It is also extremely difficult for a doctor to progress through the ranks in hospital medicine, so the pay is going to be relatively average for most doctors throughout their careers.
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    (Original post by solarplexus)
    KCL medicine for me is more prestigious (this is my opinion)...

    I could have applied to economics if I didn't want to do medicine anyway....especially as LSE don't interview (kinda weird and easier for me seeing as you claim it to be better than oxbridge)....I know that I would probably have had a decent chance (got relevant work exp and could have done the extra reading)..

    I agree A grades are nothing significant....and they made it very easy for me to get 3A*s at a-level or maybe its just me.

    But I would be more impressed personally if I saw a Doctor from Oxbridge/Kings/UCL/ICL/Edinburgh than a guy with a degree in economics from LSE....that is just me though.....


    Lol just realized...did you honestly think I was degrading LSE for not doing medicine? Where did I say that previously? Im not that uninformed as you think...they are the london school of economics for a reason....haha
    7 Keys to becoming a classy woman:-

    1) You should start by being a high quality woman and projecting (marketing) yourself as such.

    2) Develop rituals that support your sense or self-worth.

    3) A high class woman rarely loses her cool.

    4) Great Posture.

    5) Authenticity

    6) Be True to Yourself

    7) Dress modestly where it fits.

    Good luck!
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    (Original post by War and Peace)
    Umm, LSE's BSc in Economics requires a minimum of A*AA with an A* in Maths. The latest figures show that the program received 2,747 applicants for 211 places. The MSc in Economics requires a First with a strong background in Economics and Maths. It received 1,026 applications for 132 places. The MSc in Econometrics and Mathematical Economics requires the same qualifications and received 325 applications for 23 places. LSE's Department of Economics is widely viewed as the best outside the US. In short, perhaps you're not impressed, but applicants can only really claim to have a slight chance at these programs.
    I don't know why everyone makes a big deal out of A*AA!!! That doesn't really impress me.

    Medical school admission ratios are also like that (one has a 12 applicants for every 1 place).

    It may impress the general public obviously.



    (Original post by Blitzkrieg15)
    7 Keys to becoming a classy woman:-

    1) You should start by being a high quality woman and projecting (marketing) yourself as such.

    2) Develop rituals that support your sense or self-worth.

    3) A high class woman rarely loses her cool.

    4) Great Posture.

    5) Authenticity

    6) Be True to Yourself

    7) Dress modestly where it fits.

    Good luck!
    LOL...you are making this immature now but...

    Just because someone reads this and applies this to their life, doesn't mean they automatically become 'upper'/'high' class. In fact they usually will never be, because high class women are already born into a high class lifestyle. The only real high class in the UK is the top 1% of the whole of UK already born into prestigious families, anybody who tries to label themselves as being 'high class' is just pretentious and wants to inflate themselves.

    I only regard myself as being middle class (most people do as that is where they actually fit into society).

    Anybody who thinks themselves as being upper class is pretentious and also has no idea of class (can't be learnt solely needs to be attained through lifestyle and family values, money, education and views) they therefore are usually lower middle class.
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    (Original post by solarplexus)
    I don't know why everyone makes a big deal out of A*AA!!! That doesn't really impress me.

    Medical school admission ratios are also like that (one has a 12 applicants for every 1 place).

    It may impress the general public obviously.





    LOL...you are making this immature now but...

    Just because someone reads this and applies this to their life, doesn't mean they automatically become 'upper'/'high' class. In fact they usually will never be, because high class women are already born into a high class lifestyle. The only real high class in the UK is the top 1% of the whole of UK already born into prestigious families, anybody who tries to label themselves as being 'high class' is just pretentious and wants to inflate themselves.

    I only regard myself as being middle class (most people do as that is where they actually fit into society).

    Anybody who thinks themselves as being upper class is pretentious and also has no idea of class (can't be learnt solely needs to be attained through lifestyle and family values, money, education and views) they therefore are usually lower middle class.
    As a doctor you won't be earning that much, unless you can do what most can't and sail through the ranks to Registrar or Consultant. Also it takes a while for some to even get their first job, and often it is far from home in some random place they know nothing about. Too many medical graduates coming through.
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    (Original post by Blitzkrieg15)
    As a doctor you won't be earning that much, unless you can do what most can't and sail through the ranks to Registrar or Consultant. Also it takes a while for some to even get their first job, and often it is far from home in some random place they know nothing about. Too many medical graduates coming through.
    Its pretty clear to me the only things you know about medicine are the words Registrar and Consultant...

    First off there aren't too many medical graduates coming through, it is just the right amount especially when we take into account the aging population.

    Second, every doctor graduating in the UK is guaranteed their first job, called the foundation doctor job. Its only far from home if you graduated bottom of your class or do poorly on your SJT, and this is the same of any degree, its probably safe to say that if you graduated bottom of your class in Econ at LSE and were voted least likely to succeed you probably won't be working at hedge fund anytime soon.

    Third, not everyone wants to become a consultant, many want to become GPs, it is a great lifestyle.

    Fourth is that all doctors earn quite similar amounts no matter if you obtain a Consultant position or if you become a GP. Generally GPs can expect somewhere between 80,000-100,000 while Consultants usually can earn more somewhere between 90,000-175,000 depending on their seniority and working hours and with bonuses and supplemental income this can be much higher. Those in surgery who work in private hospitals can earn much more although there aren't good numbers on this.

    http://careers.bmj.com/careers/advic...ml?id=20000354

    Either way, most people in medicine go into it because they want to take care of others while also taking care of themselves. Unlike bankers for example even in a hypothetical apocalyptic scenario doctors will still be one of the most valuable professions while bankers will be pretty useless. Also, bankers love to talk about the few who reach the pinnacle of the profession, the vast majority don't make it and unlike medicine this part is actually true. This isn't even to say anything about longevity, to be able to stay in a company like Goldman Sachs is difficult: a common phrase is "up or out".
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    (Original post by Okorange)
    Its pretty clear to me the only things you know about medicine are the words Registrar and Consultant...

    First off there aren't too many medical graduates coming through, it is just the right amount especially when we take into account the aging population.

    Second, every doctor graduating in the UK is guaranteed their first job, called the foundation doctor job. Its only far from home if you graduated bottom of your class or do poorly on your SJT, and this is the same of any degree, its probably safe to say that if you graduated bottom of your class in Econ at LSE and were voted least likely to succeed you probably won't be working at hedge fund anytime soon.

    Third, not everyone wants to become a consultant, many want to become GPs, it is a great lifestyle.

    Fourth is that all doctors earn quite similar amounts no matter if you obtain a Consultant position or if you become a GP. Generally GPs can expect somewhere between 80,000-100,000 while Consultants usually can earn more somewhere between 90,000-175,000 depending on their seniority and working hours and with bonuses and supplemental income this can be much higher. Those in surgery who work in private hospitals can earn much more although there aren't good numbers on this.

    http://careers.bmj.com/careers/advic...ml?id=20000354

    Either way, most people in medicine go into it because they want to take care of others while also taking care of themselves. Unlike bankers for example even in a hypothetical apocalyptic scenario doctors will still be one of the most valuable professions while bankers will be pretty useless. Also, bankers love to talk about the few who reach the pinnacle of the profession, the vast majority don't make it and unlike medicine this part is actually true. This isn't even to say anything about longevity, to be able to stay in a company like Goldman Sachs is difficult: a common phrase is "up or out".
    Has it occurred to you that most medical students DO NOT want to be GPs? It was only a few years ago that only 1 in 3 new medical graduates found jobs, and to this day many say their first job is somewhere undesirable, and further down the line it is hard to progress in hospital medicine.

    Also, you tend to make sweeping statements like the above. Why? Do you have an attitude problem? Do you seek arguments and attention? Are you are drama king? Was it you who recently ridiculed QS World Rankings?

    I'm not interested in reading any more of your messages, so don't quote me again.
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    Lse is recognised globally and is a very prestigious university, you're also more likely to get just about any job you want due to the UNis name


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    Just read the comments LOL people who think they can get into lse - everyone can talk the talk.


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    (Original post by h_1411)
    Just read the comments LOL people who think they can get into lse - everyone can talk the talk.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    LSE is a place you don't turn down if offered a place, unless it is Oxbridge, Imperial, or at a push, UCL. Worth taking a gap year if money is an issue.
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    (Original post by Blitzkrieg15)
    Has it occurred to you that most medical students DO NOT want to be GPs? It was only a few years ago that only 1 in 3 new medical graduates found jobs, and to this day many say their first job is somewhere undesirable, and further down the line it is hard to progress in hospital medicine.

    Also, you tend to make sweeping statements like the above. Why? Do you have an attitude problem? Do you seek arguments and attention? Are you are drama king? Was it you who recently ridiculed QS World Rankings?

    I'm not interested in reading any more of your messages, so don't quote me again.
    Unfortunately, in this day and age you can't attack someone and then ask them to not respond.

    It seems as if you agreed to most of my points and your offensive statements sound more like projection.

    I will address the point about GPs and medical jobs.

    I said many medical students want to become GPs not "most".

    It is true that several years ago there was a shortage of jobs but this has mostly been alleviated now. The point still remains that there are enough doctors being trained.
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    I know one of the War Studies lecturers at King's. Top lad.
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    Of course LSE!!
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    War Studies at King's gives you access to matters of international security that absolutely no other university can provide. Most of the people on this thread have no idea with what they're dealing with. True, LSE is *much* better than King's for economics and international relations (this is a relativistic statement, since in the grander scheme of things King's is by no means 'poor' in the field, only weaker in comparison to LSE) but to get into the War Studies course at KCL is a feat that even specialists in international relations may only dream of. The War Studies department at King's attracts HEAVY governmental investment, and I daresay protection.

    It's on a whole new level to the more well-known 'strengths' at King's (namely Law and Dentistry).
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    LSE >>>>>> Kings

    Whoever says otherwise is a complete idiot
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    (Original post by Anonynmous)
    LSE >>>>>> Kings

    Whoever says otherwise is a complete idiot
    This is WAR STUDIES at King's!
    '>>>>>>' is an exaggeration in the grand scheme of things, although I will admit that Economics isn't one of King's' strengths. But the War Studies department is on a whole new level, it is strongly linked to and supported by national security and intelligence.
    I don't do anything remotely similar to War Studies but even I will admit that the WS department grants you access to valuable experts in international security. Yes, LSE is marginally better than King's for Law. It is a lot better than King's for Economics. Even in matters of overall prestige and the more general field of International Relations LSE beats KCL. But the War Studies department at King's is a force to be reckoned with; I have friends in other fields who would do anything just to take mere a module in this department!

    Graduates have ended up working in high positions for NATO, the British government and numerous international organisations. Some of the the most powerful and influential figures in global politics and the military have been through the doors of the War Studies department at King's.
 
 
 
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