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How do people fail to answer even ONE question on a BMO1 paper? Watch

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    Yes I completely agree
    Don't forget binomial expansion lol otherwise it will take a long time to expand
    yh the arithmetic is ghastly so people really would have to check quite a few times over.
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    (Original post by MathMeister)
    Yes I completely agree
    Don't forget binomial expansion lol otherwise it will take a long time to expand
    yh the arithmetic is ghastly so people really would have to check quite a few times over.
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    Isn't it just 2007(2008) + 1 = (2000+7)(2000+8) + 1 = 4000000 + 30000 + 56 + 1 = 4030057
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    (Original post by Mathbomb)
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    Isn't it just 2007(2008) + 1 = (2000+7)(2000+8) + 1 = 4000000 + 30000 + 56 + 1 = 4030057
    Let n=2007 or somethig. Works out mch easier.


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    (Original post by physicsmaths)
    Let n=2007 or somethig. Works out mch easier.
    Posted from TSR Mobile
    That's what I did.
    It strangely turns out the quotient is the same as the thing your dividing by.
    They do like to make lovely questions
    it's quite hard to see this with the numbers
    In fact the 0.5*(denominator)^2=numerator
    so 2*numerator= denominator^2
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    (Original post by physicsmaths)
    You got q3 wrong, don't embarrass yourself and close this. The answer is n=11.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Its 21 lol wtf troll.

    Think about it
    1+2+3 = 6
    Therefore you cannot ever let 1, 2, 3 and 6 ever be in the same group together.

    Now, consider the smallest integer in a potential group for a + b + c = d
    The smallest integer that is REQUIRED 100% needed to make a group is 1 for values of n between 6 and 8, 2 for 9 to 11 (2+3+4=9), 3 for 12 to 14, 4 for 15 to 17, 5 for 18 to 20, and you can make a set of 21 with 6+7+8.
    For 11 (an all n<21) all you have to do is split one group up so that it has the numbers 1-5 and the other group has no chance of making a set.
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    lmfao 11 is the answer that's bullsh*t
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    (Original post by HLN_Radium)
    For 11 (an all n<21) all you have to do is split one group up so that it has the numbers 1-5 and the other group has no chance of making a set.[/B]
    1+1+1=3
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    (Original post by james22)
    1+1+1=3
    yeah but you used 1 three times. You need to use 2 and 3 as your next smallest numbers.
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    (Original post by HLN_Radium)
    yeah but you used 1 three times. You need to use 2 and 3 as your next smallest numbers.
    Read the question again lol.
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    (Original post by james22)
    Read the question again lol.
    no u
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    (Original post by HLN_Radium)
    no u
    Let x=y=z=1 and ;et w=3, what is wrong with this? Nothings says they have to be distinct (it actually clarifies that they don't).
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    (Original post by james22)
    Let x=y=z=1 and ;et w=3, what is wrong with this? Nothings says they have to be distinct (it actually clarifies that they don't).
    it said x y z not any combination of x x and x or z y y
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    (Original post by HLN_Radium)
    it said x y z not any combination of x x and x or z y y
    It clearly says they don't need to be distinct.
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    (Original post by james22)
    I clearly said they don't need to be distinct.
    ftfy
    just cuz u said it doesnt mean the question said it
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    (Original post by HLN_Radium)
    ftfy
    just cuz u said it doesnt mean the question said it
    Determine the least natural number
    n
    for which the following
    result holds:
    No matter how the elements of the set
    {
    1
    ,
    2
    , . . . , n
    }
    are coloured red
    or blue, there are integers
    x, y, z, w
    in the set (not necessarily distinct)
    of the same colour such that
    x
    +
    y
    +
    z
    =
    w

    Read the bit in bold.
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    (Original post by james22)
    Determine the least natural number
    n
    for which the following
    result holds:
    No matter how the elements of the set
    {
    1
    ,
    2
    , . . . , n
    }
    are coloured red
    or blue, there are integers
    x, y, z, w
    in the set (not necessarily distinct)
    of the same colour such that
    x
    +
    y
    +
    z
    =
    w

    Read the bit in bold.
    lol making stuff up and adding it to the question k.
    i know what I read when I read the question
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    (Original post by physicsmaths)
    Let n=2007 or somethig. Works out mch easier.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    ??? That is the answer once you are left with the arithmetic. To get to that I used that method though :P
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    (Original post by HLN_Radium)
    lol making stuff up and adding it to the question k.
    i know what I read when I read the question
    i made an account just to downvote you
    where's the downvote button
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    just read through the posts. You guys got baited by OP; I think the trolls win this one.
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    (Original post by james22)
    ...
    I struggle to understand the question lol
    what have colours got to do with it?
    plz explain
 
 
 
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