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    (Original post by Smash Bandicoot)
    oh **** are both Damien Dalgaard and Etomidate Nate?

    Look man, if you trolled me re: my ex and Superman in 2013, u getting blocked bruh
    Nah I'm actually your dad. I'm here to tell you that you eat too much protein, son.
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    (Original post by Etomidate)
    Nah I'm actually your dad. I'm here to tell you that you eat too much protein, son.
    good talking to you bruh, have a nice 2015
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    My 2p:

    I don't view medical school as a waste of my 20s - even on the worst days. Being a doctor (and training to be one) is a privilege, and I'm grateful for the opportunity.

    However, I will not deny that medical school (or rather, moving away for medical school) certainly has changed a lot of other aspects of my life, and not always for the better. The city/area I work and study in is not somewhere I'd ever have considered living in before medical school (and I will be moving away as soon as is humanly possible). In that sense, yes, it's kind of annoying that I'm spending my 20s in a city I don't particularly like, but on the other hand, I've been hanging around with medics since my mid-teens so I've long been aware that doing this degree (and later as a doctor) means you have to be willing to move around every few years, including to places you wouldn't necessarily choose to be in. Such is the nature of being a junior medic in the UK.

    My social life has definitely suffered since moving here (especially since starting clinical medicine). Part of this is because I'm on a GEP which can be fairly intense, but another big factor is that this city and I just don't get along. It's just not my scene - classic square peg in a round hole situation. Yes, I get a bit envious sometimes when I check Facebook and see my non-medic friends having an awesome time back home, going out way more than me, getting drunk every weekend, still living like students etc...but on the other hand they also do jobs which I wouldn't ever want to do in a million years. It sucks that my social life has stalled a bit since starting clinical medicine, but I have bigger ambitions, and I wouldn't consider throwing them away just so I can pretend I'm 19 again.

    Other things: yes, I've found clinical medicine definitely makes meeting new people (for relationships, or hell, even just making new friends) virtually impossible - but again, I'm hoping this is just a temporary thing. Exams permitting, I haven't got that much longer left at medical school, then I can move away, make a fresh start somewhere else, and hopefully improve my social life a bit. Medical school is only for 4/5/6 years, but a medical degree stays with you for life. I'd rather have a mediocre few years as a student, but get to do a job I love for the next 40!

    Weekends: Generally fine at medical school. Occasionally get asked by consultant to come in (like today :dry:), but aside from that they're mine.

    tl;dr: I'm a grown up and I chose to go to medical school. It has its frustrating moments, but no one forced me into it, and I don't view it as a waste. The great thing about a medical degree is that you can use it anywhere, so you don't have to be stuck somewhere you don't like forever and ever
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    I think the thread starter has to be a wind up merchant. Who can afford to buy a house in their 20s if they aren't in a professional job that they spent a lot of years training and studying for, and why would anyone with a choice want to start having kids in their early 20s?
    If there's a good way to waste your 20s it's to have kids early and get stuck in a suburban rut.
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    Community Assistant
    (Original post by AsandaLFC)
    As ive stated before. I would like to travell and meet my soul mate. I wouldnt want to meet someone when im 30 bcos the possibilities of meeting someone at that age are
    I'm glad you have enough money to spend your 20s travelling the world without needing a job. I guess if you have enough money you might even get lucky and meet your "soul mate", though this would seem a lot more likely at university.

    Most people are not rich though and have to live in the real world.
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    (Original post by AsandaLFC)
    I feel as if 20 to 25 will be my prime years. Having heard all the horrible stories about how medical school leaves u with little or no social life im skeptical I will be regretting not doing things like:
    . Going to the restaurant with friends
    . Meeting my soulmate
    . having fun with friends during weekends
    . Travelling



    Posted from TSR Mobile
    You don't have as much times as people studying other subjects but it doesn't mean you can't do those things. You probably can't do them as often, but there are also massive rewards to the career. The pros definitely outweigh the cons for me.
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    (Original post by spleenharvester)
    I am also having this dilemma. I've been looking at grad entry medicine, but I'd be 26 by the time I leave med school.
    I'm doing GEM and I'll be 26 when I finish. I get the mick take out of me for being one of the youngest on the course.

    DO IT!
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    (Original post by CuddlyViking)
    I'm doing GEM and I'll be 26 when I finish. I get the mick take out of me for being one of the youngest on the course.

    DO IT!
    I did standard undergrad medicine and was 25 when I finished (gap year, 6 year course) - mid-twenties is hardly past it!
    • Study Helper
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    Study Helper
    (Original post by AsandaLFC)
    I feel as if 20 to 25 will be my prime years. Having heard all the horrible stories about how medical school leaves u with little or no social life im skeptical I will be regretting not doing things like:
    . Going to the restaurant with friends
    . Meeting my soulmate
    . having fun with friends during weekends
    . Travelling



    Posted from TSR Mobile
    In medical school, I get to do all of those things, and am now in my 20s. Except I don't believe in soulmates.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
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    (Original post by Hype en Ecosse)
    Except I don't believe in soulmates.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I dont want to die alone

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • TSR Support Team
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    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by AsandaLFC)
    I dont want to die alone

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Out of all the answers you get and you only reply to that.

    What guarantee do you have that you'll meet your soul mate before 25? What makes you think the person you meet in your early twenties is the person you'll still be with in your thirties?

    You can't put things off just because you have some idealised notion of meeting a soul mate in your early twenties and then life will magically fall into place after.



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    (Original post by ForestCat)
    Out of all the answers you get and you only reply to that.

    What guarantee do you have that you'll meet your soul mate before 25? What makes you think the person you meet in your early twenties is the person you'll still be with in your thirties?

    You can't put things off just because you have some idealised notion of meeting a soul mate in your early twenties and then life will magically fall into place after.



    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I'd also have thought that it's almost certainly easier for someone to find a partner whilst they're still at university. There's instantly around 100 people of the opposite sex of roughly equivalent intelligence that you are in contact with.
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    is there anyone who studied access to medicine and wouldn't mind sharing some experience with me? thanks
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    I'm in first year at med school and I'm 17 so I will be 23 when I graduate with an undergraduate MBChB and a BSc- I don't think I'm missing out on normal teenage things!
 
 
 
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