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17-18 is too yong to make a degree decision! watch

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    (Original post by morgan8002)
    You start university at 18, so there's no way of deciding later. To get everything sorted out, you need to decide at 17.
    Tell us more.
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    (Original post by Xin Xang)

    Not to sound like a snob, but I am honestly surprised when I see classmates mucking around throughout lessons.

    I mean why are they even there?
    They arr young and having fun while youre miserable

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    (Original post by Xin Xang)
    Perhaps one solution would be to make exams more difficult, in the sense that more background reading and intuition would be necessary to do well, increasing the likelihood one would have of finding their "niche subject" earlier on.

    I personally think A Levels should be only for those who WANT to learn.

    Not to sound like a snob, but I am honestly surprised when I see classmates mucking around throughout lessons.

    I mean why are they even there?
    I'm not against making school harder, so long as: a) there are viable options for those not interested in education at that stage (apprenticeships, vocational training etc.) and b) people feel able to reenter education at any further stage in life, once they've decided it's what they really want.

    I'm against having compulsory education until 18 (I think 16 is much more reasonable), since as you say some people simply aren't interested and become disruptive. :sadnod:
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    (Original post by AsandaLFC)
    They arr young and having fun while youre miserable

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    I'm not miserable. I'm happy.



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    In my country you go to uni when you're 19/20 (though have to choose your "A level" subjects at 15/16) and people still have no idea what to do. I don't think it's about age, it's that while you're still at school it's difficult to imagine pursuing an actual career and living real life.
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    (Original post by Xin Xang)
    Perhaps one solution would be to make exams more difficult, in the sense that more background reading and intuition would be necessary to do well, increasing the likelihood one would have of finding their "niche subject" earlier on.

    I personally think A Levels should be only for those who WANT to learn.

    Not to sound like a snob, but I am honestly surprised when I see classmates mucking around throughout lessons.

    I mean why are they even there?
    I think most people who do A-levels do want to learn, but not necessarily learn those subjects. People should better choose their A-levels so that they are studying what they want to. No-one at my college really mucks around, but few do the further reading that they should (maybe because they don't enjoy that subject completely).

    I agree that exams should be more difficult, but primary and secondary education needs to be much better to prepare students for these more challenging exams. I also think that students need to be encouraged to self-study and learn at a higher level than expected.

    (Original post by TurboCretin)
    Tell us more.
    In order to continue to study at a higher and higher level, you need to start university as soon as possible. Most people only have the required ability to start by 17, so you should start then.

    If you wanted further explanation of why you have to choose a course before you enrol for it, if two events occur t=further apart than the time that it takes for light to travel between them, observers can agree on the order with respect to time in which they happen.
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    (Original post by Bobbitt)
    Really?
    Yeah - 13 years of school for those who completed the Abitur.
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    I agree with this. Both of my parents left school at 16 and don't know much about education and the job prospects specific routes can give you. When you're at the age of 15 when you decide the subjects to take at A-level that then affect your suitability to a specific degree, you need some external advice. Schools should consult students more about careers and the requirements, by actually having dedicated classes that offer this support. Intellectual ability, interests and opinions change so much during your teenage years: wise advice needs to be given.
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    This explains why uni is full of pisshead hipster kids
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    (Original post by morgan8002)
    If you're seriously committed to your field, you wouldn't wait 22-42 years without proper study in that field.
    You assume everyone who does a degree is doing it to get a job. Many people in the 45+ age range never had the opportunity or the support now offered to gain a university education. The only option open to them was the OU.

    They do it to challenge themselves and for the sense of achievement and pride it gives them.
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    (Original post by uberteknik)
    You assume everyone who does a degree is doing it to get a job. Many people in the 45+ age range never had the opportunity or the support now offered to gain a university education. The only option open to them was the OU.

    They do it to challenge themselves and for the sense of achievement and pride it gives them.
    I didn't assume that. I assumed that the majority were doing it to improve their understanding in a specific field that they are passionate about, with the remainder doing it just for the job at the end. I am in the first category.


    Obviously the 45+s who never had the chance are for a separate discussion, that's a totally separate thing.
 
 
 
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