Should the UK see a grand coalition? Watch

Poll: Should the UK see a Tory-Labour coalition?
Yes (9)
17.31%
No (41)
78.85%
Undecided (2)
3.85%
Jammy Duel
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#41
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#41
(Original post by scrotgrot)
I guess they didn't, and look what it's led to...

I am not suggesting the OBR isn't independent, no. I mentioned that Osborne set it up so that even the most committed of Tories wouldn't be able to claim OBR approval is meaningless or subject to "left-wing bias".
Well, if the Chancellor is capable of stopping them costing the opposition then surely that means they aren't independent?
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jenkinsear
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#42
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#42
The idea of Labour being in power horrifies me beyond belief, so any form of coalition arrangement that keeps them out I will support. Any that involves them being in office = an absolute no.
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scrotgrot
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#43
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#43
(Original post by Jammy Duel)
Well, if the Chancellor is capable of stopping them costing the opposition then surely that means they aren't independent?
Oh right, no, they are independent but obviously the Chancellor gets to set the rules about what gets submitted to them, and for political expediency has declined to allow them to cost opposition spending plans. If Labour were elected and the Tories in opposition it would be the same story the other way round.
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scrotgrot
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#44
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#44
(Original post by jenkinsear)
The idea of Labour being in power horrifies me beyond belief, so any form of coalition arrangement that keeps them out I will support. Any that involves them being in office = an absolute no.
Well I'm afraid the Tories are so toxic to the electorate and to the other parties, particularly the SNP, that no Tory-led coalition will have the numbers to form a majority government.
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jenkinsear
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#45
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#45
(Original post by scrotgrot)
Well I'm afraid the Tories are so toxic to the electorate and to the other parties, particularly the SNP, that no Tory-led coalition will have the numbers to form a majority government.
If the Tories can get 300 seats, I disagree. Assume 25 Liberals, 9 DUP and (not they are needed) 2 UKIP and you have a majority government. Polls suggest 300 seats is perfectly possible.
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Jammy Duel
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#46
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#46
(Original post by scrotgrot)
Oh right, no, they are independent but obviously the Chancellor gets to set the rules about what gets submitted to them, and for political expediency has declined to allow them to cost opposition spending plans. If Labour were elected and the Tories in opposition it would be the same story the other way round.
Sounds rather off, surely they could still do their own costing, or even hire somebody to do it for them if they wanted it badly enough
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scrotgrot
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#47
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#47
(Original post by Jammy Duel)
Sounds rather off, surely they could still do their own costing, or even hire somebody to do it for them if they wanted it badly enough
At which point the papers would be all "left-wing bias". It has to be the independent body whose job is to look into these things.
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scrotgrot
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#48
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#48
(Original post by jenkinsear)
If the Tories can get 300 seats, I disagree. Assume 25 Liberals, 9 DUP and (not they are needed) 2 UKIP and you have a majority government. Polls suggest 300 seats is perfectly possible.
No they don't, by an aggregate of polls the Tories are predicted around 270 and have been at that level basically forever. I don’t know what polls you're looking at but feel free to carry on hoping!
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Clez
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#49
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#49
A Labour/Tory coalition would never work, theres only about 3 things theyd both agree on and 1 of those would be the level of corruption to be maintained in Westminster.

I really dont understand why anyone would vote SNP when the referendum has passed and they have their own national council - and if they really did get more powers its questionable why theyd need to be in Westminster in the first place other than international policy.

Best coalition available would be a Green/Labour one but that isnt going to happen.
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FrostyLemon
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#50
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#50
In my opinion, failure to form a majority government indicates the parties all need to **** off and get some new policies as they aren't representing the interests of enough people. Biggest problem with politics atm, made even worse by the fact you can team up with your rivals and change everything once you get power anyway. If I bull****ed my way into a job and couldn't do it as advertised I'd get the sack. Shambles.
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Dalek1099
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#51
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#51
(Original post by Manitude)
I'd like to see it at least tried. I think if the two main parties stopping trying to score political brownie points by criticising each other without really saying anything useful then maybe they could actually get a lot of good stuff done. I get the impression that a lot of the jeering in the HoC is ultimately to try and persuade the electorate that the oppositions ideas are no good and they shouldn't vote for them. In reality I think their behaviour only seems to discourage people from engaging with politics and make them less likely to listen to what people are actually saying.

I think that having both of them in power and with the spirit of compromise they could deliver policies that are reasonable, realistic and which won't ruin the finances of the country. In essence they'd calm each other down and find the centre ground that makes the most amount of people satisfied.

I'd rather see this than a Green/UKIP government or a Labour minority government. Or a Labour-Lib Dem coalition. Or a Labour-SNP coalition. Or a Conservative-UKIP coalition. Admittedly some of those possibilities are very unlikely but you really cannot trust a party leader to keep their word on anything, even if they say 'we will not form a coalition with XYZ party' or 'I pledge to vote against any increase in fees in the next parliament'
It should never ever be tried creating a Labour/Tory coalition would remove democracy and the whole point of voting as that option would always be available to them unless miracles happen on results day and this would be devastating for both parties and their supporters as they would leave in thousands as the minor parties have been proven that they are right that they are the same as each other.There is the potential of riots on the street if this happened as the right of everyone has been took off them as well.
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MagicNMedicine
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#52
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#52
(Original post by FrostyLemon)
In my opinion, failure to form a majority government indicates the parties all need to **** off and get some new policies as they aren't representing the interests of enough people. Biggest problem with politics atm, made even worse by the fact you can team up with your rivals and change everything once you get power anyway. If I bull****ed my way into a job and couldn't do it as advertised I'd get the sack. Shambles.
Well to form a Coalition government you need to compromise which then invites the accusation that you bull****ed your way in to a job like the Lib Dems on tuition fees.

If all parties stuck to their principles you would never get any coalitions.
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MaxReid
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#53
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#53
Is the SNP that much of a threat? I mean really, they wouldn't vote against a Labour minority administration or a Lib-Lab minority gov't. I imagine they will abstain on most divisions in the House of Commons anyway, but that's just my view
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Quady
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#54
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#54
(Original post by MagicNMedicine)
Well to form a Coalition government you need to compromise which then invites the accusation that you bull****ed your way in to a job like the Lib Dems on tuition fees.

If all parties stuck to their principles you would never get any coalitions.
Not an entirely fair example. The Lib Dems negotiated an abstention from a vote on tuition fees in the coalition agreement. They then voted anyway.
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Davij038
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#55
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#55
(Original post by MagicNMedicine)

If all parties stuck to their principles you would never get any coalitions.
So then you think there should have been a conservative majority government, even thought they only got something like 30% of the vote?
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Rakas21
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#56
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#56
(Original post by Davij038)
So then you think there should have been a conservative majority government, even thought they only got something like 30% of the vote?
They got 36.1%.
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Davij038
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#57
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#57
(Original post by Rakas21)
They got 36.1%.
That's still not great is it?

The majority they had when when combining witht he liberals then would be just under 60%, thats far more representative than 36%
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Rakas21
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#58
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#58
(Original post by Davij038)
That's still not great is it?
No but it's more than Labour got in 05 with their majority.
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Davij038
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#59
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#59
(Original post by Rakas21)
No but it's more than Labour got in 05 with their majority.
True but that didn't end so well for them.

In any case, I think we need as strong a government as possible whilst still being as representative as possible. Strong coalitions like the current one can help to provide this.
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MagicNMedicine
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#60
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#60
(Original post by Davij038)
So then you think there should have been a conservative majority government, even thought they only got something like 30% of the vote?
No I think there should be coalitions, with compromises.

But people can't then turn around and accuse the parties of abandoning their principles.

As for the attack on tuition fees well this was stirred up by the media to attack Lib Dems. One of the core Conservative pledges was to cut inheritance tax, this was even a theme of the final leaders debate days before the election. That got dropped as part of the Coalition agreement. I'm surprised more wasn't made of that abandonment of a key Conservative pledge.
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