Salmond and his evil plan. Watch

Quady
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#41
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#41
(Original post by Unistudent77)
It's up to you. Either accept we want Devo max, give that and Scotland will remain a good partner in the union for a decent while or ignore us and we'll leave.
You may not like the SNP's involvement but you better get used to the idea
I do wonder how this will change once a Govt in Scotland starts to raise income tax relative to the rUK.

The SNP have the power to increase spending but haven't taken it. I only presume they've made a judgement call that taking folk out of poverty is too big a risk if it means other people have to pay for it.
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Unistudent77
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#42
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#42
(Original post by Quady)
I do wonder how this will change once a Govt in Scotland starts to raise income tax relative to the rUK.

The SNP have the power to increase spending but haven't taken it. I only presume they've made a judgement call that taking folk out of poverty istoo big a risk if it means other people have to pay for it.
Yep, I think most in the SNP would be in favour of raising taxes in order to fund better public services.
However, they're voters are found in all age and social categories and therefore they'll avoid alienating their more right leaning voters until later on I think
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TritonSails
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#43
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#43
(Original post by TIS200)
My eyes have never burned so much. The sound of his evil plan is so repulsive.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-32045419

Basically, the SNP (well, Alex) wants to block out the Tory government with a coalition with Labour. Thoughts on this? It would be against democracy.. You can't block parties (well the Nazis did..). Starting something, eh Alex?

GET YOUR DIRTY HANDS OFF OUR DEMOCRACY & ENGLAND, ALEX!
This isn't anti-democratic at all. Scotland is a part of Britain. Their MPs may vote in parliament however they like. It is in fact undemocratic to suggest that Scottish MPs shouldn't vote according to the interests of their constituents.

In May there is not going to be a single election on who runs the country. There are going to be 600+ elections determining who represents each constituency at Parliament. That is the only thing we are voting for: our local MP.

It is then up to these MPs to form a government, and if that government consists of people who have been voted for and who can form a majority in the Commons -- be that a majority consisting of one party with the most MPs or the parties with the 2nd and 3rd most in a coalition/demand and supply arrangement -- then it is necessarily democratic. Or, at least, no less democratic than a typical majority single-party government or the current coalition government.

I think you have fundamental misconceptions about how Parliament works.
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Quady
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#44
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#44
(Original post by Unistudent77)
Yep, I think most in the SNP would be in favour of raising taxes in order to fund better public services.
However, they're voters are found in all age and social categories and therefore they'll avoid alienating their more right leaning voters until later on I think
I don't think their left leaning voters will love a tax hike that much either tbh

Edit, a tax hike would be needed to maintain public services as the block grant is reduced with a move to devo-max. Let alone to improve them.
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TritonSails
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#45
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#45
(Original post by Fanatical Geek)
But what if they're the largest single party - but the other smaller parties ally together just because they don't like the Conservatives, and want to "keep them out."

Technically speaking, there's nothing constitutionally undemocratic about that, but in that scenario are they acting int the interests of the people? Or the parties themselves?

Is that democratic? That it's possible that the party with the most votes may not end up in government?

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Sure it is. This is really just a matter of semantics. In your situation, left-wing parties gained the most seats, so there is a left-wing government. See? Doesn't sound so undemocratic now does it? In reality 'the people' only vote for who represents their individual constituency, and any government that can gain a majority in the Commons is necessarily 'democratic'.
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