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64% of the UK did not want David Cameron as priminister watch

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    Evidently most of them did not care enough to vote.
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    (Original post by whorace)
    Evidently most of them did not care enough to vote.
    The turnout this year is 66%, the highest since 1997's 71.4%.

    'Evidently most of them did not...vote'. How?
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    (Original post by Tawheed)
    Perhaps not, but Labour fight for more people than the tories do. A party of less debt and less taxes cutting welfare, raising tuition fee's to give tax breaks on the rich at the cost of indebting future generations with even more debt.
    The Tories won get over it. Yes the electoral system is disproportionate but it has worked for a long time and does have some positives such as extreme groups such as UKIP are kept out of government. It's annoying that people like you probable didn't even care to vote when the Lib Dems proposed to change it but now are up in arms just because labour lost. Labour has benefited from this system too as previously mentioned how in 2005 they only got 35% of the vote and 355 seats with the Tories on 32.4% and only 198 seats. You can't cry about how unfair a system is only when the result doesn't suit you despite being more than happy to benefit from it previously. Hyprocisy really annoys me. Am I worried what going to happen without the Lib Dems acting as a buffer? Yes but its really not the end of the world. The Conservatives(Tories)/Labour(Whigs) have ruled intermittently for centuries. Labour will get their turn again.
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    (Original post by Little Toy Gun)
    The turnout this year is 66%, the highest since 1997's 71.4%.

    'Evidently most of them did not...vote'. How?
    The Cons received the highest percentage of the popular votes, and the most seats, the 34% that moan should get off their lazy backsides and vote.
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    How much of this figure is SNP or Green?
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    (Original post by Tawheed)
    I knew this from a while ago, it's just shocking when you count the numbers and reflect.
    I'm sure you wouldn't be so surprised if Labour won
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    Not really clear. With 37% explicit Conservative vote and 12% UKIP who would probably take DC over any other alternative to Farage, that gives him 49%. Add the DUP and the fact I rounded Tory/UKIP vote share down and he probably gets a majority.

    The left bloc is a lot more fragmented. Neither the SNP nor Labour can afford to explicitly endorse the other. The Lib Dems no longer have a clear platform.

    It's also far from unprecedented. Labour in 2005 won a huge majority polling 35% of the vote to the Tories' 32%.
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    (Original post by Tawheed)
    Almost 2/3rds of the UK did not want the conservatives to be in government - and they are.

    Thoughts on this?

    This isn't a random figure, i go by the total votes, which put tories at around 36% of the vote. Infact, only 6% more than labour who had 30%. So much for democracy even though i can't think of a better system as yet to supply a majority government.
    70% did not want Labour to be in government. 92% didn't want the Lib Dems.

    If we accept that no party is ever going to satisfy everyone, it makes sense to choose the one that's least disliked to form a government. And right now, that's the Conservatives.
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    (Original post by Tawheed)
    Perhaps not, but Labour fight for more people than the tories do. A party of less debt and less taxes cutting welfare, raising tuition fee's to give tax breaks on the rich at the cost of indebting future generations with even more debt.
    Too bad the electorate disagrees with you. Democracy, eh?

    Left-whingers indeed ...
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    (Original post by Tawheed)
    Perhaps not, but Labour fight for more people than the tories do. A party of less debt and less taxes cutting welfare, raising tuition fee's to give tax breaks on the rich at the cost of indebting future generations with even more debt.
    Oh, so democracy doesn't matter when it works in your favour?
    I'm sorry OP, your whole argument is a joke.
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    (Original post by Observatory)
    Not really clear. With 37% explicit Conservative vote and 12% UKIP who would probably take DC over any other alternative to Farage, that gives him 49%. Add the DUP and the fact I rounded Tory/UKIP vote share down and he probably gets a majority.

    The left bloc is a lot more fragmented. Neither the SNP nor Labour can afford to explicitly endorse the other. The Lib Dems no longer have a clear platform.

    It's also far from unprecedented. Labour in 2005 won a huge majority polling 35% of the vote to the Tories' 32%.
    You will be happy to see my data posted up there. In the last 45 elections, only 12 of them produced a winning party with more than 50% of the popular votes, and this includes year when there were very few, if not only practically two, parties.

    In two of those years, the Opposition actually had more popular votes (above 50% even). The highest in record was the first one with such data available, back in 1832 with Earl Grey tea whilst the lowest was in 1918 when Bonar Law got into power. The last three elections were at the lower end of the spectrum, but the coalition government last term had the second-highest vote share combined.

    (Original post by Little Toy Gun)
    Just to provide some numbers:

    2015: 36.9% The Rt Hon David Cameron
    2010: 36.1% + 23% = 59.1% The Rt Hon David Cameron
    2005: 35.2% The Rt Hon Anthony Blair
    2001: 40.7% The Rt Hon Anthony Blair
    1997: 43.2% The Rt Hon Anthony Blair
    1992: 41.9% The Rt Hon Sir John Major
    1987: 42.2% The Rt Hon Baroness Margaret Thatcher
    1983: 42.4% The Rt Hon Baroness Margaret Thatcher
    1979: 43.9% The Rt Hon Baroness Margaret Thatcher
    1974 (Oct): 39.2% The Rt Hon Baron Harold Wilson
    1974 (Feb): 37.2% The Rt Hon Baron Harold Wilson
    1970: 46.4% The Rt Hon Sir Edward Heath
    1966: 48.0% The Rt Hon Baron Harold Wilson
    1964: 44.1% The Rt Hon Baron Harold Wilson
    1959: 49.4% The Rt Hon Earl Harold Macmillan
    1955: 49.7% The Rt Hon Earl Anthony Eden
    1951: 44.3% The Rt Hon Sir Winston Churchill
    1950: 46.1% The Rt Hon Earl Clement Attlee
    1945: 47.7% The Rt Hon Earl Clement Attlee
    1935: 47.8% The Rt Hon Earl Stanley Baldwin
    1931: 55.0% The Rt Hon Earl Stanley Baldwin
    1929: 37.1% The Rt Hon Ramsay MacDonald
    1924: 46.8% The Rt Hon Earl Stanley Baldwin
    1923: 38.0% The Rt Hon Earl Stanley Baldwin
    1922: 38.5% The Rt Hon Andrew Bonar Law
    1918: 33.3% The Rt Hon Andrew Bonar Law
    1910 (Dec): 43.9% The Rt Hon Earl Henry Asquith
    1910 (Jan): 43.1% The Rt Hon Earl Henry Asquith
    1906: 48.9% The Rt Hon Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman
    1900: 50.3% The Rt Hon Marquess Robert Gascoyne-Cecil
    1895: 49.0% The Rt Hon Marquess Robert Gascoyne-Cecil
    1892: 47.0% The Rt Hon Marquess Robert Gascoyne-Cecil
    1886: 51.1% The Rt Hon Marquess Robert Gascoyne-Cecil
    1885: 47.4% The Rt Hon William Ewart Gladstone
    1880: 54.7% The Rt Hon Duke Spencer Cavendish
    1874: 44.3% The Rt Hon Earl Benjamin Disraeli
    1868: 61.5% The Rt Hon William Ewart Gladstone
    1865: 59.5% The Rt Hon Viscount Henry John Temple
    1859: 65.7% The Rt Hon Viscount Henry John Temple
    1857: 65.9%
    The Rt Hon Viscount Henry John Temple
    1852: 41.9% The Rt Hon Earl Edward Smith-Stanley (Opposition won 57.9%)
    1847: 42.7% The Rt Hon Earl Edward Smith-Stanley (Opposition won 53.8%)
    1841: 50.9% The Rt Hon Sir Robert Peel
    1837: 51.7% The Rt Hon Viscount William Lamb
    1835: 57.3% The Rt Hon Viscount William Lamb
    1832: 67.9% The Rt Hon Earl Charles Grey

    No data available before this.
    (Original post by Arbolus)
    70% did not want Labour to be in government. 92% didn't want the Lib Dems.

    If we accept that no party is ever going to satisfy everyone, it makes sense to choose the one that's least disliked to form a government. And right now, that's the Conservatives.
    I think the idea is not to not have the Conservatives in government or have any power, but rather that they should have a fewer number of seats to reflect their popularity and approval better. This way, they will form a coalition with other parties and increase their legitimacy to rule.

    The coalition last term had the second highest combined vote share of the last 45 elections, and highest of the last 44.

    (Original post by whorace)
    The Cons received the highest percentage of the popular votes, and the most seats, the 34% that moan should get off their lazy backsides and vote.
    My question was how you could say 'most' did not vote when most did.

    (Original post by Marshall Taylor)
    How much of this figure is SNP or Green?
    Vote shares:
    1. Conservatives - 36.9% - 11,334,920 votes
    2. Labour - 30.4% - 9,347,326 votes
    3. UKIP - 12.6% - 3,881,129 votes
    4. Lib Dems - 7.9% - 2,415,888 votes
    5. SNP - 4.7% - 1,454,436 votes
    6. Greens - 3.6% - 1,157,613 votes

    7. DUP - 0.6% - 184,260 votes
    8. PC - 0.6% - 181,694 votes
    9. SF - 0.6% - 176,232 votes
    10. UUP - 0.4% - 114,935 votes
    11. SDLP - 0.3% - 99,809 votes
    12. Alliance - 0.2% - 61,556 votes
    13. TUSC - 0.1% - 36,327 votes
    14. NHA - 0.1% - 20,210 votes
    15. TUV - 0.1% - 16,538 votes
    16. Respect - 0.0% - 9,989 votes
    17. Cannabis - 0.0% - 8,419 votes
    18. Yorkshire - 0.0% - 6,811 votes
    19. ED - 0.0% - 6,531 votes
    20. MRLP - 0.0% - 3,898 votes
    21. SLP - 0.0% - 3,481 votes
    22. CPA - 0.0% - 3.260 votes
    23. Christians - 0.0% - 3,205 votes
    24. Workers - 0.0% - 2,724 votes
    25. BNP - 0.0% - 1,667 votes
    26. Class - 0.0% - 529 votes

    Seats in the House of Commons:
    1. Con - 331 - 50.9% - 14% more
    2. Lab - 232 - 35.7% - 5.3% more
    3. SNP - 56 - 8.6% - 3.9% more
    4. DUP - 8 / LD - 8 - 1.2% each - 0.6% more / 6.7% less
    6. SF - 4 - 0.6% - same
    7. PC - 3 / SDLP - 3 - 0.5% each - 0.1% less / 0.2% more
    9. UUP - 2 - 0.3% - 0.1% less
    10. Grn - 1 / UKIP - 1 / Others - 1 - 0.2% each - 3.4% less / 12.4% less
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    (Original post by Little Toy Gun)
    Just to provide some numbers:
    The majorities before the war were when there were very few other parties so voters had little option, so obviously vote majorities were more common.

    You cannot count the 2010 vote as a majority for David Cameron when the other votes were for Nick Clegg, who was deputy. The thread was referring to votes for the prime minister, not for the government, and we are using the assumption OP meant that: vote for the party = vote for the prime minister.
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    (Original post by Tawheed)
    Perhaps not, but Labour fight for more people than the tories do. A party of less debt and less taxes cutting welfare, raising tuition fee's to give tax breaks on the rich at the cost of indebting future generations with even more debt.
    You can't claim a labour government would be more legitimate because you like their policies. You don't care about the voting system, you just want a labour in power.

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    (Original post by Maid Marian)
    What I don't understand is how UKIP came third but only got one seat. wat wat wat
    Because they were not 1st in a lot of places, the came 2nd or 3rd so it means they didn't gett many seats
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    (Original post by Aj12)
    You can't claim a labour government would be more legitimate because you like their policies. You don't care about the voting system, you just want a labour in power.

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    The voting system is really something labour or tory voters need to consider. However, i am clamping down on the tories because they represent a lot less people, and far more will benefit under labour in my own opinion, and that is why the numbers feel bitter.
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    (Original post by Tawheed)
    Almost 2/3rds of the UK did not want the conservatives to be in government - and they are.

    Thoughts on this?

    This isn't a random figure, i go by the total votes, which put tories at around 36% of the vote. Infact, only 6% more than labour who had 30%. So much for democracy even though i can't think of a better system as yet to supply a majority government.
    Where were all the left wing outcries when labour won the last election with even less of a majority.....
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    (Original post by Tawheed)
    The voting system is really something labour or tory voters need to consider. However, i am clamping down on the tories because they represent a lot less people, and far more will benefit under labour in my own opinion, and that is why the numbers feel bitter.
    Your own opinion is frankly irrelevant here. The conservative party got more votes, ergo it has more legitimacy and represents more people Before you try to harp on about whose policies benefit who more, that does not matter.

    If you want electoral reform by all means agitate for it, it is a worthwhile go. However leave the ideological bias at the door, you just undermine yourself otherwise.
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    (Original post by Tawheed)
    The voting system is really something labour or tory voters need to consider. However, i am clamping down on the tories because they represent a lot less people, and far more will benefit under labour in my own opinion, and that is why the numbers feel bitter.
    And in the opinion of the electorate, you're wrong.

    That's democracy, buddy.
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    (Original post by Maid Marian)
    I don't understand how that works



    I see :/
    First Past the Post works by electing the party member with the most votes, or the first one to achieve a majority of votes in their constituency, as their elected representative. Take a hypothetical scenario where we only have 2 parties, Tory and Labour, and each party has a candidate standing in every constituency in the UK. In every single seat, Tory beat Labour by 1 vote. This means Tories get all 650 seats in the Commons, even though Labour got 49% of the nation's vote. Tories have 100% of the seats for 51% of the vote. This is the reality of how FPTP works.

    Similarly, because of this, UKIP can end up with 15% of the country's vote and only 1 seat - since they were always a minority party in the constituencies they stood in, albeit a popular one. Whereas the SNP have very concentrated support - standing only in the 59 seats in Scotland - they have huge support in those 59 constituencies so can end up with 56 seats with only 5% of the national vote (but over 50% of the vote in the constituencies they stood in). Whereas UKIP would consistently get around about 15% of the vote but spread over a much larger number of constituencies.

    This is why people put a lot of stock in a proportional representation system over FPTP.
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    (Original post by littleangel9914)
    The Tories won get over it. Yes the electoral system is disproportionate but it has worked for a long time and does have some positives such as extreme groups such as UKIP are kept out of government. .
    How are UKIP 'extreme'?
 
 
 
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