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    PM me if you want mygcsescience(dot)comm vids, with QA
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    New rumours are spreading that AQA P3 paper will be very easy , because in previous years there have been harder papers.Maybe even nice than the C2 and C3 papers .
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    Terminal velocity regarding a parachuter and why a car reaches an ultimate speed would be good. Also a comparison on radiation particles like alpha, gamma and beta properties what they are used for, how do you stop them ect. I think that would be a brilliant question to show knowledge on


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    (Original post by a456)
    Thank you, but how do you decide which equation to pick from the sheet? I always end up confused which one it is? Sorry.
    Easiest way is to look at what's mentioned in the question and see what equation they are all mentioned in for example you get a question asking you to calculate the distance travelled and you've been given speed, distance and time. You look on the equation sheet find the equation that mentions all three things which will be S=D/T then you rearrange it in order to get the formula to work out what you want. So you times by T on the right so you Times by T on the left. This means SxT=D. Also I learnt the basic equations so I wouldn't waste time looking for common ones


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    (Original post by Theawesomejem)
    Easiest way is to look at what's mentioned in the question and see what equation they are all mentioned in for example you get a question asking you to calculate the distance travelled and you've been given speed, distance and time. You look on the equation sheet find the equation that mentions all three things which will be S=D/T then you rearrange it in order to get the formula to work out what you want. So you times by T on the right so you Times by T on the left. This means SxT=D. Also I learnt the basic equations so I wouldn't waste time looking for common ones


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    Thank you very much. I have a better idea of what do now. 😊
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    (Original post by Blueyy__)
    -(insulated) wires carry a.c. to primary coil

    -this produces a changing magnetic field in the iron core

    -which produces a magnetic field in the secondary coil

    -this induces a alternating pd/voltage across the secondary coil

    -so there is a a.c. is in the secondary coil
    (Original post by 11Jason11)
    The primary coil is connected to an AC supply. An alternating current passes through a primary coil wrapped around a soft iron core. The changing current produces a changing magnetic field. This induces an alternating voltage in the secondary coil.This induces an alternating current (AC) in the circuit connected to the secondary coil.
    Thank you so much!! :yy:

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    (Original post by barbaras99)
    I was talking to my teacher and he gave me an answer that would be worth 5/5 for a transformer question so I memorised it aha:
    An alternating current is passed through the the primary coil. This produces an alternating magnetic field. The alternating magnetic field passes through the soft iron core. The magnetic field flips inside the secondary coil. This induces and alternating potential difference inside the secondary coil. An alternating current then flows through the secondary coil.

    He said that the word 'alternating' is very important to get you full marks
    Thank you! I hope this comes up now haha

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    My predictions for 5/6 markers (I haven't done a couple of papers yet so I may change it once I've done them)

    P2: Hooke's law experiment, star formation, car safety (I wish)

    P3: centre of mass experiment or motor effect maybe?

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    (Original post by Lauren-x-)
    My predictions for 5/6 markers (I haven't done a couple of papers yet so I may change it once I've done them)

    P2: Hooke's law experiment, star formation, car safety (I wish)

    P3: centre of mass experiment or motor effect maybe?

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    Oh no! I forgot what Hook's law is someone explain!
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    (Original post by 11Jason11)
    Oh no! I forgot what Hook's law is someone explain!
    The exact wording is the extension of a spring is directly proportional to the force applied providing the limit of proportionality isn't exceeded I think

    On a graph you start with a straight line through the origin then it starts to curve as the limit of proportionality is exceeded and the extension no longer increases at the same rate as the force applied.
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    (Original post by VioletPhillippo)
    The exact wording is the extension of a spring is directly proportional to the force applied providing the limit of proportionality isn't exceeded I think

    On a graph you start with a straight line through the origin then it starts to curve as the limit of proportionality is exceeded and the extension no longer increases at the same rate as the force applied.
    Oh Okay thanks- So is the graph exponential?
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    100% certain a three-marker 'How does a transformer work?' question will come up as there wasn't one last year.
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    (Original post by neil20143)
    100% certain a three-marker 'How does a transformer work?' question will come up as there wasn't one last year.
    But there was a 6 marker on transformers last year I think
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    (Original post by 11Jason11)
    But there was a 6 marker on transformers last year I think
    Not on how they worked though. That was just asking about the number of coils and how it affected the p.d.
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    (Original post by 11Jason11)
    Oh Okay thanks- So is the graph exponential?
    Not quite it's a straight line through origin up to a certain point then it starts to curve to the right
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    what is meant why the number of neutrons? Is it the mass number?
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    I really can't understand circuits for P2, especially all the rules for series and parallel and if you had to work out something from a given circuit/if you have to draw one. Can anyone help? Like does anyone have any simple notes or recommend anything that could help?i always seem to understand it all when i'm revising and then in the exams i just don't get it
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    Please discuss this in an English forum.
    Thanks 😀
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    (Original post by hope99)
    I really can't understand circuits for P2, especially all the rules for series and parallel and if you had to work out something from a given circuit/if you have to draw one. Can anyone help? Like does anyone have any simple notes or recommend anything that could help?i always seem to understand it all when i'm revising and then in the exams i just don't get it
    Learn the circuit diagrams to draw a circuit, firstly.
    Rules:
    Ammeter must always be places in series (even in a parallel circuit), as well as the component under test and the variable resistor (if your using one) (also you need to know what a thermistor, ammeter, voltmeter, diode and variable resistor do, because they could be up to a 3 mark question on them)
    Voltmeter must be always be placed in parallel, parallel to the component under test.
    Series
    Different components are connected in a line, end to end between the +ve and ve- in a series circuit.
    1. Potential difference is shared: the voltages round a series circuit add up to equal the source voltage.
    V= V1 =+ V2
    2) Current is the same everywhere
    A1=A2
    3) Resistance adds up
    R= R1 + R2 + R3
    4) Cell voltages add up
    potential difference when more cells are in series is bigger, if the cells are all connected in the same way.
    2) E.g two batteries of voltage 1.5 V are connected in series so they suply 3V between them.
    Parallel
    1. P.D is the same across all components.
    V1= V2=V3
    2. Current is shared between branches
    A= A1+A2+A3
    Name:  plct.png
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    The way to remember it is that a voltmeter works by detecting the voltage either side of a component. If it is placed in series then the voltage would be the same either side because there is no component offering resistance. If the voltage is the same either side, it will not provide a result.

    This means that a voltmeter must be in parallel. The rest can be worked out from this:
    If a voltmeter is in parallel then an ammeter must be in series.

    For components in series:
    - the current is the same in each component
    - voltage (potential difference) is shared between components

    For components in parallel:
    - the total current is shared (different for each component)
    - the potential difference is the same for each component
 
 
 

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