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    (Original post by Uz25)
    You know primary school teachers do they produce the powerpoint presentation everyday? Do they only teach one class?..

    Do they only teach eng maths and science?

    How often does your salary increase. ?

    Is primary schoolteachinglessstressful compared to secondary school teaching mind the spaces... . .
    I have a terrifying feeling you are just looking for a low-stress job with a nice salary. You mostly ask about pay and workload, despite everyone here telling you in several ways that while the pay is alright, it's fairly disproportionate to the work you are expected to do in your own time. Having done both, they're both stressful in different ways. Please don't just jump for whichever sounds easiest - you won't be happy.
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    Nobody can make your mind up for you, it's just frustrating to see someone only want to know about money and free time, without once mentioning or indicating any actual passion for teaching and children.

    Without a genuine passion for these things, you are really going to struggle on those low days when you are up to your ears in paperwork.
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    (Original post by Veggiechic6)
    For some people, a high salary isn't the be all and end all of a career. The attractions of teaching are rather obvious, I suggest you think a bit harder, I'm sure you can answer your own question.
    Lighten up will ya!

    Other jobs within the government, such as the civil service and MI5 to name a few, offer graduates schemes with better pay & working conditions, and offer quite a lot of job security. I just don't understand why anyone would become a teacher with degrees in such good subjects such STEM subjects.
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    (Original post by lledrith)
    I have a terrifying feeling you are just looking for a low-stress job with a nice salary. You mostly ask about pay and workload, despite everyone here telling you in several ways that while the pay is alright, it's fairly disproportionate to the work you are expected to do in your own time. Having done both, they're both stressful in different ways. Please don't just jump for whichever sounds easiest - you won't be happy.
    Obviously, who would want to be stressed at work and at home? In regards to the salary, who doesn't want to earn well? I want to do a job which is the best and if it's stressful I it should be as much as I can handle.

    People say that I've got a bubbly personality and can interact with anyone. I'm good at presenting PowerPoint presentation. I'm caring and like helping people. People that don't care about studying, can annoy me. How ever, I tolerate anger well,I laugh it off.

    I'm planning to do some work experience to distinguish whether teaching is for me...
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    (Original post by Uz25)
    Obviously, who would want to be stressed at work and at home?
    That's the question of the century!

    Most teachers I know take work home with them when there hasn't been time to sort it during the day, it's fairly standard practice.
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    (Original post by lledrith)
    That's the question of the century!

    Most teachers I know take work home with them when there hasn't been time to sort it during the day, it's fairly standard practice.
    Aha lol. What's your career plan?

    From what I've said previously, do you think teaching could be my "thing "
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    (Original post by Uz25)
    Aha lol. What's your career plan?

    From what I've said previously, do you think teaching could be my "thing "
    I have since left teaching personally, and have just finished an Access to HE diploma in Bio, Chem, and Physics. I'm starting a BSc in Medical Imaging this September. I loved teaching, and still do, but I wanted to do something different with my life that didn't involve lugging home hundreds of books to mark every weekend.

    It seems to me like you still aren't sure, and it certainly isn't for anyone on TSR to tell you whether or not teaching is for you - thankfully the work experience will help you with that. I just don't think you should jump head first into a career so quickly based on sparse information and opinions from a forum.
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    [QUOTE=lledrith;56104427]I have since left teaching personally, and have just finished an Access to HE diploma in Bio, Chem, and Physics. I'm starting a BSc in Medical Imaging this September. I loved teaching, and still do, but I wanted to do something different with my life that didn't involve lugging home hundreds of books to mark every weekend.

    It seems to me like you still aren't sure, and it certainly isn't for anyone on TSR to tell you whether or

    True.. .
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    (Original post by Killerpenguin15)
    Lighten up will ya!

    Other jobs within the government, such as the civil service and MI5 to name a few, offer graduates schemes with better pay & working conditions, and offer quite a lot of job security. I just don't understand why anyone would become a teacher with degrees in such good subjects such STEM subjects.
    Hard to lighten up when people ask such silly questions. The other jobs you've mentioned offer nothing that teaching offers. Nobody is saying teaching has great pay and working conditions. Clearly, there must be other factors at work that draw people to teaching otherwise it wouldn't be one of the biggest graduate ambitions. As I said before, you really shouldn't need me to reel off a list for you. Try to open your mind past the more mundane facts of a job.
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    Get some experience and I think you will know.

    I didn't plan on becoming a teacher, I kind of fell into it (was unemployed briefly after university, an agency contacted me for a support role in a school after seeing my CV online. This led to cover supervisor work including long-term supply in my degree subject.) and found that I loved it.

    It is difficult, it is stressful, it can be really wearing (I know we get a lot of holidays but I am SO ready for this holiday) but it suits my personality and I can't imagine doing anything else. I'm a massive extrovert and am basically fuelled by interactions with other people, so it's the perfect job for me.

    The pupils definitely make it worthwhile - I teach some absolutely amazing kids, and it's also great when you win a small battle with a more challenging pupil. My bottom-set Y11 have gone from outright refusing to complete any assessments, to having all passed their qualificiation. It's only an FCSE (foundation certificate) not a GCSE but it's still a huge achievement for them.
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    (Original post by Veggiechic6)
    Hard to lighten up when people ask such silly questions. The other jobs you've mentioned offer nothing that teaching offers. Nobody is saying teaching has great pay and working conditions. Clearly, there must be other factors at work that draw people to teaching otherwise it wouldn't be one of the biggest graduate ambitions. As I said before, you really shouldn't need me to reel off a list for you. Try to open your mind past the more mundane facts of a job.
    The question was slightly silly, no need to be so rude about it.

    I never said, either, that teaching leads to a great paying career with great working conditions. You say that teaching is one of the biggest graduate ambitions, sources? If you don't want to - and I quote - "reel off a list for [me]" then don't even respond to my question. It's no excuse for you to act so entitled because someone else doesn't know the answer to a question in which the answer might be obvious for you. I think you will find that there are others on this thread who are at least able to answer a very straightforward question, unlike people such as you. Don't get so butthurt.
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    Have to agree that in the North £22k starting salary is good. I live up North and I think that's a lot of money considering the pay for other jobs that are on offer in my area. There aren't a lot of jobs for graduates up here either. But the money is not the reason to go into teaching. You have to be passionate about your job, as it's very demanding and takes up all of your time.
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    (Original post by charl0tte90)
    Have to agree that in the North £22k starting salary is good. I live up North and I think that's a lot of money considering the pay for other jobs that are on offer in my area. There aren't a lot of jobs for graduates up here either. But the money is not the reason to go into teaching. You have to be passionate about your job, as it's very demanding and takes up all of your time.
    Where in the North out of interest? I'm just about to move!


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    (Original post by laura.a.c265)
    Where in the North out of interest? I'm just about to move!


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    Merseyside. Obviously depends what sector you want to go into, etc but if you want to go into teaching then theres plenty of teaching jobs around. Just not much of anything else!

    If you want to go into media then obviously theres Media City in Salford.

    There just isn't a lot in sectors I've been looking into.
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    I'm not a teacher but considering training. The salary is a factor for me, amongst many other factors including job satisfaction, variety, wanting to make a difference to children's lives, etc etc. The children do come first and thats the number one reason why I'd be doing the job if I pursue it. As someone mentioned before that they are an extrovert, I'm the opposite (I'm quiet, but I'm confident, outgoing and definitely not shy) so not even sure teaching would be the right career for me but I'm still considering it.
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    (Original post by charl0tte90)
    I'm not a teacher but considering training. The salary is a factor for me, amongst many other factors including job satisfaction, variety, wanting to make a difference to children's lives, etc etc. The children do come first and thats the number one reason why I'd be doing the job if I pursue it. As someone mentioned before that they are an extrovert, I'm the opposite (I'm quiet, but I'm confident, outgoing and definitely not shy) so not even sure teaching would be the right career for me but I'm still considering it.
    How old are you?
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    (Original post by Uz25)
    How old are you?
    It's not really relevant but I'm a graduate.
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    (Original post by TraineeLynsey)
    That comes down to your personal opinion. I started my first job after uni in 2008 on 16k. In London. By comparison, 22k now in the north east should seem hugely generous, but for the amount of work I would say it's not nearly enough.

    But it is what it is, and we all know the pay scale before we start.
    What teacher are you
    Secondary or sixth form


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    NQT secondary speaking here..
    Yep, the workload is huge, yep it's stressful and yep, the money seems little for the workload. But!
    Seeing my other half do a nice City job and return home 3-4 hours (or even more!) later than I do does make me wonder that bigger money means bigger chunk of your life taken. Time wise...

    I honestly cannot say what's better. Sometimes I'm just really happy that I HAVE a job. Not everyone is so lucky.
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    If you work yourself up, expect 50k+ many teachers at my school have been offered this amount and I'm at a state school
 
 
 

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