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    (Original post by Eat_revision)
    Sure give me a few minutes.
    ....
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    (Original post by moshaike)
    ....
    Here You go
    Note: I left intro and conclusion blank because that's your opinion and you choose how to write your opening.

    How have relationships between Parents and Children changed? (33 marker)

    Intro:

    Point 1: Research shows that the social expectations of fathers being breadwinners are now changing. For example Dermotts study shows the conventional role of the father being the breadwinner is now being changed by what she calls the "intimate father." Her research involved 25- semi structured interviews with fathers who had atleast one child at primary age who were all in professional jobs. She looked at how these men combined employment and family life. Their paid work was not seen as central towards their role as fathers instead they had sought the role of being intimate fathers where it involved them to be open to a close relationship with their children and form an emotional bond. Similarly this is also supported by the sociologist Thompson. He found out that only 39% of fathers had agreed that being a breadwinner was the most important aspect of fatherhood. In the research he found out that 80% of fathers would want to stay at home and look after their child. However social class was the main factor affecting expectations. For example research by the Equal opportunities commission showed that majority of fathers still believed that being a breadwinner was the primary aspect of fatherhood and 65% had still thought that women were naturally better at childcare. This shows that even though there is a range of father roles in contemporary families, the traditional ideology of father roles and mother roles still exist to this day.

    Point 2: Jenks believes that post modern societies are more child centred compared to the past. The government has organised policies which promises to look after children and keep them happy, healthy and safe as well as being provided the best education, have free opportunity and contribute to a better society and economy. The nurturing of children is seen as more important than the well being of adults. In these modern societies divorce has been frequent but children have been seen as the most important in the relationship and laws such as The Child support act protects children's welfare during parental separation. This shows that children are the main priority in the relationship and the child act law encourages parents to first think about their children before they come to a decision of separating.

    Point 3: On the other hand sociologist such as Neil Postman claims that childhood is disappearing and that the distinction between childhood and adulthood has been eroded in recent years that there is no childhood any more. He claims that this is because of the growth in mass media which has exposed children to the adult world of sex, violence and suffering through mediums such as the internet and television. This becomes extremely difficult for parents to control and regulate children's behaviour as they become influence through negative role models in the media who promote these negative acts and so parents can no longer protect children from the filth of the media. This makes children grow up quicker and their behaviour becomes immoral which was not the problem with children in the past. However in addition, Postman has no real evidence of how children in the past was sheltered and protected from sexuality and adult life.

    Point 4: Another sociologist Sue Palmer believes that childhood is under threat and describes it as toxic childhood. She has blamed the modern technologies for harming children as parents are using them as an alternative to traditional parenting methods to engage with children. Instead of spending quality time with children such as reading a book or engaging in fun activities, parents rely on the use of television, video games and junk food to keep children happy and quiet. Therefore children are deprived from traditional family life and childhood. She also claims that children become more impulsive, self obsessed and becomes more lazy to study due to the influences of technology and lack of quality time spent with parents.

    Point 5: Chapman believes that the change in parent and children's relationships have changed drastically as a result of the increase of married women in paid employment. In the 1960's working mothers were criticized for neglecting their children, however now it is seen as better for women to get out to work and this gives fathers the chance becoming more involved in childcare.

    Point 6: However the increase of fathers in parenting does not necessarily mean that mothers and father play the same role in parenting. Backette found that mothers still took the lead of deciding the main features of childcare. Father's found it difficult to interpret their child's needs. A further research by Carol Smart who researched 60 couples that were divorced found that it was most of the time mothers who continued to advise their former spouses about how they should look after their children.

    Conclusion:
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    (Original post by Eat_revision)
    Here You go
    Note: I left intro and conclusion blank because that's your opinion and you choose how to write your opening.

    How have relationships between Parents and Children changed? (33 marker)

    Intro:

    Point 1: Research shows that the social expectations of fathers being breadwinners are now changing. For example Dermotts study shows the conventional role of the father being the breadwinner is now being changed by what she calls the "intimate father." Her research involved 25- semi structured interviews with fathers who had atleast one child at primary age who were all in professional jobs. She looked at how these men combined employment and family life. Their paid work was not seen as central towards their role as fathers instead they had sought the role of being intimate fathers where it involved them to be open to a close relationship with their children and form an emotional bond. Similarly this is also supported by the sociologist Thompson. He found out that only 39% of fathers had agreed that being a breadwinner was the most important aspect of fatherhood. In the research he found out that 80% of fathers would want to stay at home and look after their child. However social class was the main factor affecting expectations. For example research by the Equal opportunities commission showed that majority of fathers still believed that being a breadwinner was the primary aspect of fatherhood and 65% had still thought that women were naturally better at childcare. This shows that even though there is a range of father roles in contemporary families, the traditional ideology of father roles and mother roles still exist to this day.

    Point 2: Jenks believes that post modern societies are more child centred compared to the past. The government has organised policies which promises to look after children and keep them happy, healthy and safe as well as being provided the best education, have free opportunity and contribute to a better society and economy. The nurturing of children is seen as more important than the well being of adults. In these modern societies divorce has been frequent but children have been seen as the most important in the relationship and laws such as The Child support act protects children's welfare during parental separation. This shows that children are the main priority in the relationship and the child act law encourages parents to first think about their children before they come to a decision of separating.

    Point 3: On the other hand sociologist such as Neil Postman claims that childhood is disappearing and that the distinction between childhood and adulthood has been eroded in recent years that there is no childhood any more. He claims that this is because of the growth in mass media which has exposed children to the adult world of sex, violence and suffering through mediums such as the internet and television. This becomes extremely difficult for parents to control and regulate children's behaviour as they become influence through negative role models in the media who promote these negative acts and so parents can no longer protect children from the filth of the media. This makes children grow up quicker and their behaviour becomes immoral which was not the problem with children in the past. However in addition, Postman has no real evidence of how children in the past was sheltered and protected from sexuality and adult life.

    Point 4: Another sociologist Sue Palmer believes that childhood is under threat and describes it as toxic childhood. She has blamed the modern technologies for harming children as parents are using them as an alternative to traditional parenting methods to engage with children. Instead of spending quality time with children such as reading a book or engaging in fun activities, parents rely on the use of television, video games and junk food to keep children happy and quiet. Therefore children are deprived from traditional family life and childhood. She also claims that children become more impulsive, self obsessed and becomes more lazy to study due to the influences of technology and lack of quality time spent with parents.

    Point 5: Chapman believes that the change in parent and children's relationships have changed drastically as a result of the increase of married women in paid employment. In the 1960's working mothers were criticized for neglecting their children, however now it is seen as better for women to get out to work and this gives fathers the chance becoming more involved in childcare.

    Point 6: However the increase of fathers in parenting does not necessarily mean that mothers and father play the same role in parenting. Backette found that mothers still took the lead of deciding the main features of childcare. Father's found it difficult to interpret their child's needs. A further research by Carol Smart who researched 60 couples that were divorced found that it was most of the time mothers who continued to advise their former spouses about how they should look after their children.

    Conclusion:
    this will help alot, thank you!
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    (Original post by Eat_revision)
    Hi, so when you have that 33 marker please upload the structure here. Btw for demographic changes do you reckon any specifics are going to come up like Extended families or ageing population. For example the question might be Explain two ways how extended families affect the family.
    I have an A grade example of the postmodernism question which I will upload asap tomorrow! Mornings ops fully, So sorry, I have been so busy with revision today I completely forgot!
    And hm possibly yeah!
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    (Original post by Eat_revision)
    Here You go
    Note: I left intro and conclusion blank because that's your opinion and you choose how to write your opening.

    How have relationships between Parents and Children changed? (33 marker)

    Intro:

    Point 1: Research shows that the social expectations of fathers being breadwinners are now changing. For example Dermotts study shows the conventional role of the father being the breadwinner is now being changed by what she calls the "intimate father." Her research involved 25- semi structured interviews with fathers who had atleast one child at primary age who were all in professional jobs. She looked at how these men combined employment and family life. Their paid work was not seen as central towards their role as fathers instead they had sought the role of being intimate fathers where it involved them to be open to a close relationship with their children and form an emotional bond. Similarly this is also supported by the sociologist Thompson. He found out that only 39% of fathers had agreed that being a breadwinner was the most important aspect of fatherhood. In the research he found out that 80% of fathers would want to stay at home and look after their child. However social class was the main factor affecting expectations. For example research by the Equal opportunities commission showed that majority of fathers still believed that being a breadwinner was the primary aspect of fatherhood and 65% had still thought that women were naturally better at childcare. This shows that even though there is a range of father roles in contemporary families, the traditional ideology of father roles and mother roles still exist to this day.

    Point 2: Jenks believes that post modern societies are more child centred compared to the past. The government has organised policies which promises to look after children and keep them happy, healthy and safe as well as being provided the best education, have free opportunity and contribute to a better society and economy. The nurturing of children is seen as more important than the well being of adults. In these modern societies divorce has been frequent but children have been seen as the most important in the relationship and laws such as The Child support act protects children's welfare during parental separation. This shows that children are the main priority in the relationship and the child act law encourages parents to first think about their children before they come to a decision of separating.

    Point 3: On the other hand sociologist such as Neil Postman claims that childhood is disappearing and that the distinction between childhood and adulthood has been eroded in recent years that there is no childhood any more. He claims that this is because of the growth in mass media which has exposed children to the adult world of sex, violence and suffering through mediums such as the internet and television. This becomes extremely difficult for parents to control and regulate children's behaviour as they become influence through negative role models in the media who promote these negative acts and so parents can no longer protect children from the filth of the media. This makes children grow up quicker and their behaviour becomes immoral which was not the problem with children in the past. However in addition, Postman has no real evidence of how children in the past was sheltered and protected from sexuality and adult life.

    Point 4: Another sociologist Sue Palmer believes that childhood is under threat and describes it as toxic childhood. She has blamed the modern technologies for harming children as parents are using them as an alternative to traditional parenting methods to engage with children. Instead of spending quality time with children such as reading a book or engaging in fun activities, parents rely on the use of television, video games and junk food to keep children happy and quiet. Therefore children are deprived from traditional family life and childhood. She also claims that children become more impulsive, self obsessed and becomes more lazy to study due to the influences of technology and lack of quality time spent with parents.

    Point 5: Chapman believes that the change in parent and children's relationships have changed drastically as a result of the increase of married women in paid employment. In the 1960's working mothers were criticized for neglecting their children, however now it is seen as better for women to get out to work and this gives fathers the chance becoming more involved in childcare.

    Point 6: However the increase of fathers in parenting does not necessarily mean that mothers and father play the same role in parenting. Backette found that mothers still took the lead of deciding the main features of childcare. Father's found it difficult to interpret their child's needs. A further research by Carol Smart who researched 60 couples that were divorced found that it was most of the time mothers who continued to advise their former spouses about how they should look after their children.

    Conclusion:
    Thank you so much!!
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    I'm about to go on a all-night cramming spree considering the exam is on THURSDAY and i know NOTHING!
    From reading these comments, demographic changes and roles of parents and families is predicted to come up, anything else guys that your teachers have told you about what is gonna come up?! please let me know asap. Have not even touched family diversity, single parent families or divorce- very doubtful they will come up after close analysis! hope this helps, let me know guys! thanks.x
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    (Original post by NafK3)
    Hi guys! I'm retaking the Family unit for OCR Sociology next week. I was wondering if anyone has any pointers as to what may come up.

    From my personal research Functionalism and Marxism have been very common for the 33 markers

    Thanks in advance
    why are you taking it next week, and mine is on thursday? im confused..
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    (Original post by Eat_revision)
    Hi, so when you have that 33 marker please upload the structure here. Btw for demographic changes do you reckon any specifics are going to come up like Extended families or ageing population. For example the question might be Explain two ways how extended families affect the family.
    Here you go! This is my top answer for the 17 mark on demographic changes and 33 mark on postmodernism.
    Attached Files
  1. File Type: docx SOCIOLOGY REVISIONNN.docx (19.3 KB, 255 views)
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    Please could someone help me with the positive and negative impacts of the extended family and what studies you'd use? Also I don't no any positive things about the nuclear family apart from The New Right, whereas there's loads of negatives.
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    (Original post by Eat_revision)
    For the demographic changes what 2 ways are there?
    First one I am confident on is ageing population.
    Second one I am thinking of is family size; the increase in one person households.

    I am not sure how you got the family is not positive for everyone? What topic is that in. And parents and children is definitely going to come up 95% sure.
    BTW could you also give me the structure for Post Modern views of the family?
    the parent and children question you said it likely to come up is that for 17 mark or 33 mark
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    (Original post by av__x)
    why are you taking it next week, and mine is on thursday? im confused..
    Mine is Thursday too
    I think I started the thread on Sunday that's why I said next week lol
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    A lot of you are saying to revise Postmodernists and the New Right but the only thing I've got on them is their views in family diversity which came up last year. So could you please help me out! Postmodernists and NewRight are not my strongest suits. Much Appreciated!
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    Guys demographic changes came up as a 17 marker in 2011? do you really think theyd repeat it? i think its gonna come up as a 33 marker tbh..
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    (Original post by av__x)
    Guys demographic changes came up as a 17 marker in 2011? do you really think theyd repeat it? i think its gonna come up as a 33 marker tbh..
    Yeah but it's been four years now. Plus my teacher and other teachers from other schools had also agreed that this is predicted to come up.
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    (Original post by Eat_revision)
    Yeah but it's been four years now. Plus my teacher and other teachers from other schools had also agreed that this is predicted to come up.
    as what? 17 or 33 marker?
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    (Original post by av__x)
    as what? 17 or 33 marker?
    Demographic 17 not sure about the Parents and children one though. I did that as a 33 marker.
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    (Original post by Eat_revision)
    Demographic 17 not sure about the Parents and children one though. I did that as a 33 marker.
    what is the percentage of this question coming up
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    Hi guys,
    So far I only have a planned 17 marker for Demographic changes. What else shall I focus on?
    And for 33 marker I've planned Postmodernism and Changes in Parent and Child relationships...

    Thanks
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    (Original post by NafK3)
    Hi guys,
    So far I only have a planned 17 marker for Demographic changes. What else shall I focus on?
    And for 33 marker I've planned Postmodernism and Changes in Parent and Child relationships...

    Thanks
    Not sure what else but would you mind sending me the plan for your 17 and 33 marker?
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    DEMOGRAPHIC_CHANGE_essay (1).docDEMOGRAPHIC_CHANGE_essay (1).doc Guys i'm sorry about the missing blanks this is what my teacher has handed the class but these handouts are pretty helpful for anyone struggling with demographic change.
 
 
 
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