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    Absolutely ridiculous and juvenile. It was a simple compliment; yes, she was clearly offended by the message, however her retort was sufficient enough in conveying her annoyance. There was no need whatsoever to make this public knowledge.
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    It isn't sexist at all. What an absolute non-story.
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    (Original post by Philbert)
    Commenting on someone's appearance in a work context is not professional, but neither is publishing personal messages.
    What if if they were dressed badly in some way? commenting about it (so they can imrpove themselve) still be unprofessional?
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    (Original post by WildBerrySpirit)
    Absolutely ridiculous and juvenile. It was a simple compliment; yes, she was clearly offended by the message, however her retort was sufficient enough in conveying her annoyance. There was no need whatsoever to make this public knowledge.


    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    It isn't sexist at all. What an absolute non-story.
    I totally agree.

    I also don't understand how calling somebody "stunning" means that he has "misogynisic" intentions as she claims. She also discriminated against his age. It's just unnecessary and embarrassing.

    I think she should have accepted the compliment by saying "thank you" and leave it as it is, ignore it or just simply say "That was inappropriate". I don't think anyone would have expected that to happen. There are more things worth complaining about, than a harmless compliment.
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    (Original post by MetalAlchemist)
    I totally agree.

    I also don't understand how calling somebody "stunning" means that he has "misogynisic" intentions as she claims. She also discriminated against his age. It's just unnecessary and embarrassing.

    I think she should have accepted the compliment by saying "thank you" and leave it as it is, ignore it or just simply say "That was inappropriate". I don't think anyone would have expected that to happen. There are more things worth complaining about, than a harmless compliment.
    It's just about a common sense approach, IMO. I could understand if she replied back privately saying, "Sorry, I find that a bit inappropriate for LinkedIn". But kicking up an international fuss over something so trivial looks like complete attention-seeking and over-entitlement.
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    (Original post by kkboyk)
    What if if they were dressed badly in some way? commenting about it (so they can imrpove themselve) still be unprofessional?
    That's a good point. I guess it's different if it's something they can change. As long as it was tactful and in confidence, I can't see that being unprofessional. But that's a different situation to commenting on someone's appearance in the first interaction you've had with them when they're trying to make connections.
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    He strikes me as a dirty old man. It's a perfectly normal photo, after all you would not post one of you on your holidays or a selfie. LinkedIn is a professional networking site.
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    It is sexist to comment on a women's appearance (whether 'positive' or negative) in the workplace (or actually anywhere that it's unsolicited). Women constantly have their appearances judged ahead of their achievements. Women seen as 'conventionally attractive' are told they only got their job due to their appearance (and often people suggest they had sex with their boss to get hired/promoted) but their abilities are overlooked because 'beautiful women can't be intelligent'. Whilst women who are not seen as meeting societies standard of beauty are told to 'wear more make-up', 'lose weight', wear more revealing clothes' but are then viewed as 'vain bimbos' if they do so. If you would not comment on the same aspect of a man's appearance in the same circumstances you are objectifying women.
    Not aiming to start an argument here but a well founded debate, but how do you feel that the comment is sexist? Genuinely interested and I think it helps to hear other people's views
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    (Original post by Zerforax)
    To be honest, I think she has a point. Linkedin is a professional networking, not a dating app/network.

    You see a lot of older men being unprofessional towards young women in work environments/the City. It might seem an overreaction as a one-off (since his words weren't that lewd) but this kind of behaviour should be tackled generally and not ignored.
    Agree 100%. My sister is a solicitor in the City and inappropriate comments/gestures she receives from her male colleagues and clients is quite simply gross, considering some of them are 2x her age. There is a a very macho and sexist environment in city jobs, and that does need to be addressed.
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    I agree it is sexism to compliment someone. Because the way woman traditionally compliment is not nearly as provocative as the way a man traditionally compliments a woman. You would have to find that special tart to tell a guy to send her his penis photo but guys seem to go right into wanting to see your "bewbs."
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    This once again shows what an anti male mentality they have.
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    (Original post by Cherie Amour)
    I agree it is sexism to compliment someone.
    :erm:

    I don't think that that's true... What matters is the intent behind what is said.

    I agree that in many cases it is older men not respecting women as their colleagues/equals in a male-dominated workplace, but to say that "it is sexism to compliment someone" doesn't really make much sense.
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    (Original post by Law-Hopeful)
    :erm:

    I don't think that that's true... What matters is the intent behind what is said.

    I agree that in many cases it is older men not respecting women as their colleagues/equals in a male-dominated workplace, but to say that "it is sexism to compliment someone" doesn't really make much sense.
    The intent behind asking for tits?
    :erm: Ok.
    And it does make sense. It's discriminatory to see women as fodder.

    (Original post by Josb)
    Ok, I'm a *******.
    Bengali loves saying that.
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    (Original post by Cherie Amour)
    The intent behind asking for tits?
    No... You said that "it is sexism to compliment someone", "asking for tits" is hardly complimenting someone.

    And it does make sense. It's discriminatory to see women as fodder.
    If you actually read what I wrote you'd see that I agree.

    But, complimenting a woman ≠ seeing women "as fodder" (this is clearly where our opinions diverge).
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    (Original post by Law-Hopeful)
    No... You said that "it is sexism to compliment someone", "asking for tits" is hardly complimenting someone.


    If you actually read what I wrote you'd see that I agree.

    But, complimenting a woman ≠ seeing women "as fodder" (this is clearly where our opinions diverge).
    I hate when people say "if you actually read what I wrote." Anyway. If you read what I wrote you'd see in the first post you even quoted, I said:

    *scrolls up, selects, copies*

    You would have to find that special tart to tell a guy to send her his penis photo but guys seem to go right into wanting to see your "bewbs."



    And in that regard, I am fodder.
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    Lol clearly he literally only read what he referenced. Which was the first sentence, exclusively.
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    (Original post by Cherie Amour)
    Anyway. If you read what I wrote you'd see in the first post you even quoted, I said:

    *scrolls up, selects, copies*

    You would have to find that special tart to tell a guy to send her his penis photo but guys seem to go right into wanting to see your "bewbs."

    I wasn't replying to that, so that's not relevant.

    I was responding to your comment: "I agree it is sexism to compliment someone".

    Asking to "see your bewbs" is not a compliment, so that is irrelevant to the aforementioned statement of yours that I disagree with.
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    (Original post by Law-Hopeful)
    [/i]
    I wasn't replying to that, so that's not relevant.
    It is relevant because you can't take issue with one sentence in my post, which means you're ignoring context on purpose. Go away :erm:
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    Asking to see my breasts is a very lewd compliment. But a compliment. No guy asks to see a girl's breasts he doesn't find attractive. It's a very inappropriate,
    chauvinistic

    disrespectful

    immature compliment.

    But a compliment.

    You are that guy who likes to make your own definitions mid discussion.
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    (Original post by Cherie Amour)
    It is relevant because you can't take issue with one sentence in my post, which means you're ignoring context on purpose. Go away :erm:
    For some reason you've told me to "go away" only to then post something else in response to me (without quoting me).

    (Original post by Cherie Amour)
    Asking to see my breasts is a very lewd compliment. But a compliment. No guy asks to see a girl's breasts he doesn't find attractive. It's a very inappropriate,

    You are that guy who likes to make your own definitions mid discussion.
    How do you define a compliment? A definition I have found is: "a polite expression of praise or admiration" - I don't see how someone asking to see your "bewbs" falls under this definition.

    However, even if it did and asking to see someone's "bewbs" was in fact, somehow, a compliment, this does not logically lead to the conclusion that "it is sexism to compliment someone".

    Even in the case of this example being classed as a compliment (which I dispute, and use the definition of 'compliment' as evidence), all you have done is given one example where a 'compliment' could be sexist (and I do not deny that this example is sexist). You have not shown your original claim that "it is sexism to compliment someone".
 
 
 
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