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Assisted dying bill debated later today (Friday) - what do YOU think? watch

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  • View Poll Results: Should the law change to allow terminally ill people to die with peace and dignity?
    Yes - people have the right to dignity.
    39
    88.64%
    No - the Archbishop is right.
    5
    11.36%

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    (Original post by United1892)
    You can give them dignity in good end of life care

    You do realise it's like the treason law and pretty much nobody gets done for it.

    May be we should do this anyway instead of doing it to prevent people wanting to kill themselves.


    We'll see.
    Give somebody who has lost their mind and being and wants to run from everyone who wants to help dignity and good care?

    Just because nobody gets done for it does not mean people aren't scared.

    I think assisted dying is more likely to be legalised than anybody who needs help actually getting any.

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    (Original post by United1892)
    You can claim that but if this law goes through is it realistically going to stop there, in Holland it has gone further.

    In any case the current form of the bill is opposed by 82% of Palliative Care Doctors these are the people who will most likely know what is best for their patients as doctors.
    It will only go as far as we let it go - or rather, as far as our MPs let it go. But look at it this way: if the bill passes, it's going to be a slim majority. With this slim majority, do you really think it's likely that further amendments loosening the restrictions would be approved?

    Source? Even if this is the case, palliative doctors are rarely going to approve of assisted suicide. Why? Because their speciality is in care for those with terminal illness who are coming to the end of their lives. This bill will potentially cut the amount of people seeking palliative care significantly. So naturally they have a vested interest in such a bill not coming into fruition.
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    (Original post by Moonstruck16)
    Give somebody who has lost their mind and being and wants to run from everyone who wants to help dignity and good care?
    If they've lost their mind then this bill wouldn't legalise that.

    Just because nobody gets done for it does not mean people aren't scared.
    Well they shouldn't be.

    I think assisted dying is more likely to be legalised than anybody who needs help actually getting any.

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    Well it shouldn't be.
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    (Original post by Reluire)
    It will only go as far as we let it go - or rather, as far as our MPs let it go. But look at it this way: if the bill passes, it's going to be a slim majority. With this slim majority, do you really think it's likely that further amendments loosening the restrictions would be approved?
    On the basis of public opinion potentially yes. Particularly with younger people generally approving of it more.

    Source? Even if this is the case, palliative doctors are rarely going to approve of assisted suicide. Why? Because their speciality is in care for those with terminal illness who are coming to the end of their lives. This bill will potentially cut the amount of people seeking palliative care significantly. So naturally they have a vested interest in such a bill not coming into fruition.[/QUOTE]

    There. Not necessarily true, they could easily continue due to this bills restrictions.
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    a terrible, disturbing decision - a giant step in the wrong direction
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    (Original post by United1892)
    There. Not necessarily true, they could easily continue due to this bills restrictions.
    Thanks for providing the source; some interesting statistics there. I find Q7 pertinent though: 'What impact do you think the passing of this bill, or similar one legalising assisted suicide, would have on the delivery of palliative care including the care given by Hospices?' With approximately 72% saying 'very adverse' or 'adverse', this helps to affirm what I was saying about these doctors having a vested interest in hospices and end of life care.
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    (Original post by bippity.bingbong)
    a terrible, disturbing decision - a giant step in the wrong direction
    It's not really a step is it
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    (Original post by Reluire)
    Thanks for providing the source; some interesting statistics there. I find Q7 pertinent though: 'What impact do you think the passing of this bill, or similar one legalising assisted suicide, would have on the delivery of palliative care including the care given by Hospices?' With approximately 72% saying 'very adverse' or 'adverse', this helps to affirm what I was saying about these doctors having a vested interest in hospices and end of life care.
    Potentially true, however it focuses on the quality of delivery rather than the existence of the jobs for the doctors.
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    (Original post by United1892)
    It's not really a step is it
    everything the government/parliament choose to do or doesn't choose to do = public policy.
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    (Original post by United1892)
    No, the bill will pressure terminally ill patients to end their lives as they feel like a burden. If this is legalise where does it end? Do we let people who get MS kill themselves what about people with Downs Syndrome do we kill them?

    No life is worth any more than another this bill sets a precedent that that isnt true.

    It should also be pointed out that although technically illegal, in practice people are very rarely prosecuted.
    MS is a standard one when people fight for the right to die or to live by thier own choice. Downs is a different subject matter as you dont accquire Downs you are born with it.

    Your right that no life is worth more than another - but it is the individual who should have the right to decide.

    (Original post by United1892)
    So anyone should be allowed to kill anyone? People should be able to rape people? I should be allowed to set your house on fire?

    Because thats just what people could do with their 'independent lives'
    If your going to argue against it then at least try and argue in perspective. There is a huge difference between an allowing a terminally ill cancer patient the right to die and giving approval to rape someone


    (Original post by United1892)
    You can give them dignity in good end of life care

    You do realise it's like the treason law and pretty much nobody gets done for it.

    First point - no you cant. Dignity is like pride or honour, it cannot be taken it can only be surrendered. You can provide the most dignified of care taking every holistic method going. And the person can still fill undignified and humiliated.

    Second point - That is because as of yet, no one has been found to have done an assisted suicide for monetary or nefarious purposes.
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    (Original post by bippity.bingbong)
    everything the government/parliament choose to do or doesn't choose to do = public policy.
    Not changing policy does not make a step though.
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    Its so stupid, forcing others to go through the pain just because some idiots think that everyone should follow what they believe.
 
 
 
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