Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Overrated- Law (Dont do it! you will find it ridiculously hard to become a solicitor/barrister and, even if you are lucky enough to win the lottery that is landing a training contract/pupillage, the amount of butt kissing you would have had to do to reach that point will make your lips look as sore and pink as a pigs inflamed arse!)

    Underrated- engineering,computer science
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DIN-NARYU-FARORE)
    Overrated- Law (Dont do it! you will find it ridiculously hard to become a solicitor/barrister and, even if you are lucky enough to win the lottery that is landing a training contract/pupillage, the amount of butt kissing you would have had to do to reach that point will make your lips look as sore and pink as a pigs inflamed arse!)
    People always make this assumption, but not everyone who studies law wants to go into to the legal profession. Law is useful for so much more than that. It's a strong academic subject requiring critical thought and the absorption and appreciation of high levels of complex information. Along with an abundance of legal knowledge, this puts law grads in a perfect position to apply for jobs in business and put in competitive applications for grad schemes.

    I think people who make this assumption suppose that once law grads have failed to become solicitors or barristers, they just roll into a ball and retreat into irrelevance. No, they can still do a whole range of things with their degree.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ser Alex Toyne)
    Is that a slight upon all students practicing law? Is it?

    You stuck-up, upward nose pointing medicine ponces - think you're so much better than everybody else

    Just messing by the way.
    Hahaha
    Sure
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Underrated- Food and Nutrition, which is what I'll be starting this month.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by callum_law)
    People always make this assumption, but not everyone who studies law wants to go into to the legal profession. Law is useful for so much more than that. It's a strong academic subject requiring critical thought and the absorption and appreciation of high levels of complex information. Along with an abundance of legal knowledge, this puts law grads in a perfect position to apply for jobs in business and put in competitive applications for grad schemes.

    I think people who make this assumption suppose that once law grads have failed to become solicitors or barristers, they just roll into a ball and retreat into irrelevance. No, they can still do a whole range of things with their degree.
    But a lot do try and fail to become lawyers

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by justag)
    But a lot do try and fail to become lawyers
    That's irrelevant to the point I am making.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by callum_law)
    People always make this assumption, but not everyone who studies law wants to go into to the legal profession. Law is useful for so much more than that. It's a strong academic subject requiring critical thought and the absorption and appreciation of high levels of complex information. Along with an abundance of legal knowledge, this puts law grads in a perfect position to apply for jobs in business and put in competitive applications for grad schemes.

    I think people who make this assumption suppose that once law grads have failed to become solicitors or barristers, they just roll into a ball and retreat into irrelevance. No, they can still do a whole range of things with their degree.
    How do you convince an employer from a different field, say banking, to take you on if you do law mate?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DIN-NARYU-FARORE)
    How do you convince an employer from a different field, say banking, to take you on if you do law mate?
    I just explained to you why employers rate law grads highly. They have studied a strong academic subject and are therefore highly capable, alongside having some useful legal knowledge in their noggin.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by callum_law)
    That's irrelevant to the point I am making.
    You were ignoring the point he was making.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Overrated: Law
    Underrated: Accounting and Finance and Pharmacy
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by justag)
    You were ignoring the point he was making.
    Overrated- Law (Dont do it! you will find it ridiculously hard to become a solicitor/barrister and, even if you are lucky enough to win the lottery that is landing a training contract/pupillage, the amount of butt kissing you would have had to do to reach that point will make your lips look as sore and pink as a pigs inflamed arse!)

    The point she made was that a) law is overrated because b) it is ridiculously hard to become a solicitor or barrister.

    I responded by explaining that the argument made was flawed because a) not everyone who studies law wants to become a lawyer; and b) should people not want to pursue a legal career or they have not been successful in pursuing one, a law degree offers excellent career prospects outside of the legal profession. That directly related to the point the other poster made about the utility of a law degree. What you are suggesting is that I go off on a tangent rather than address the point made.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    [QUOTE=callum_law;59284735]I just explained to you why employers rate law grads highly. They have studied a strong academic subject and are therefore highly capable, alongside having some useful legal knowledge[QUOTE]


    Law is really not challenging. Nutshells will get you through. I dont see what they can bring to the table in terms of other fields.they dont have unique knowledge really and are not in demand really. Every degree uses 'critical thinking'. How do you even sell that? Anyone can learn,but no one really cares about the principle of donoghue v stevenson
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by callum_law)
    The point she made was that a) law is overrated because b) it is ridiculously hard to become a solicitor or barrister.

    I responded by explaining that the argument made was flawed because a) not everyone who studies law wants to become a lawyer; and b) should people not want to pursue a legal career or they have not been successful in pursuing one, a law degree offers excellent career prospects outside of the legal profession. That directly related to the point the other poster made about the utility of a law degree. What you are suggesting is that I go off on a tangent rather than address the point made.
    I'm on my phone; you expect me to care and bother checking genders?

    Most people who study law do aim to become lawyers, let's be honest. Many who fail may say they never wanted to in the first place to save face. It's not known to be a particularly interesting degree for the majority; it has a reputation for being dry. Other more interesting alternatives that link more directly to a career in a business environment would be: management, economics, business. If you wanted to work in business and that's your aim, you'd study one of those as they're more directly relevant and most people would consider them more interesting.

    There are high expectations of a future high paying career in law for many law applicants. Most don't achieve that. So the fact that a huge number of law students fail to become lawyers, let alone well paid ones, is hugely relevant to the fact it is overrated.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by DIN-NARYU-FARORE)
    How do you convince an employer from a different field, say banking, to take you on if you do law mate?
    Banks don't give a **** what you studied mate, as long as it's an actual subject.

    Obviously, this won't apply to the quant roles, that predominantly hire Maths/CS/Physics PhDs. But they represent a tiny proportion of a bank.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by justag)
    I'm on my phone; you expect me to care and bother checking genders?

    Most people who study law do aim to become lawyers, let's be honest. Many who fail may say they never wanted to in the first place to save face. It's not known to be a particularly interesting degree for the majority; it has a reputation for being dry. Other more interesting alternatives that link more directly to a career in a business environment would be: management, economics, business. If you wanted to work in business and that's your aim, you'd study one of those as they're more directly relevant and most people would consider them more interesting.

    There are high expectations of a future high paying career in law for many law applicants. Most don't achieve that. So the fact that a huge number of law students fail to become lawyers, let alone well paid ones, is hugely relevant to the fact it is overrated.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Again, the aforementioned employers don't care about what degree you study - this is the case for the majority of grad schemes in fact.

    It's almost discouraged to do an undergrad business degree if you want to do consulting/IB.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Again, the aforementioned employers don't care about what degree you study - this is the case for the majority of grad schemes in fact.

    It's almost discouraged to do an undergrad business degree if you want to do consulting/IB.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    why? i thought things like Warwick business school were targeted by IBs
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Again, the aforementioned employers don't care about what degree you study - this is the case for the majority of grad schemes in fact.

    It's almost discouraged to do an undergrad business degree if you want to do consulting/IB.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I'm not talking about the point of view of employers.

    My point is that a sixth form student who wants to work in business, is more likely to want to study one of the degrees I mentioned, rather than law.

    And your last statement isn't correct.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Meninism)
    why? i thought things like Warwick business school were targeted by IBs
    No, Warwick itself is targeted for undergrad. Its B-school is only targeted for postgrad recrutment - which is separate to undergrad.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by justag)
    I'm not talking about the point of view of employers.

    My point is that a sixth form student who wants to work in business, is more likely to want to study one of the degrees I mentioned, rather than law.

    And your last statement isn't correct.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    It is. I've been in about 5 banks for various programs, and the number of business grads I've seen is nominal in comparison to Econ, Maths, History, etc. An MBA is different however.

    Your point makes no sense, why should someone have to committ to a business degree when they can quite literally study anything they would prefer, then head into business? You don't get kudos for studying a business related degree in grad scheme applications.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by TardigradeFan)
    Earth sciences is underrated. I know not everyone finds rocks appealing, but it's a really broad subject with good career prospects and very high student satisfaction.
    I think rocks are bloody marvelous.
 
 
 
Poll
How are you feeling in the run-up to Results Day 2018?
Useful resources
Uni match

Applying to uni?

Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Articles:

Debate and current affairs guidelinesDebate and current affairs wiki

Quick link:

Educational debate unanswered threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.