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'Tea' or 'Dinner' watch

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    (Original post by TwinnyP)
    Saying tea isn't a stupid term, it makes perfect sense :lol:

    "What are we having for tea tonight?"

    Is that really difficult to grasp??
    It really does not make sense, I don't drink tea at that time of day with my food, so why say it?
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    As said above, tea is either a drink (or the leaves of a plant), or the small meal comprised of scones, biscuits, cake and other dessert-type things combined with one or many cups of tea in mid-afternoon.

    Tea is certainly not the third and final full meal of the day, you savages.
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    (Original post by ibzombie96)
    That's exactly right. Someone with a different opinion to you must live in a bubble. I've provided a list of suitable bubbles below which you can choose from:

    ****** banker brigade
    Southern softies
    Southern elite
    North London elite
    Toffs
    Snotty-nosed rich kids
    Pretentious northerners

    Delete as appropriate.
    You told me I was wrong when I offered my opinion. Add hypocrite to that list, kid.
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    Dinner... because tea is tea

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    (Original post by drowzee)
    It really does not make sense, I don't drink tea at that time of day with my food, so why say it?
    If it was a choice between "Dinner" and "sunflower" I would agree. Because that would not make sense to have Breakfast, dinner, sunflower. But it's not. And that's why half the country call it dinner and the other half call it tea.

    If it made no sense, it wouldn't be popularly used.
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    (Original post by callum_law)
    Yet you've contrived to say dinner for your latter meal like a Southern softy.
    Or because dinner makes more sense...?
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    It's tea for me, unless maybe a meal out.
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    (Original post by tehforum)
    It's a regional thing as another user pointed out.

    What does differentiate between social groups is the use of 'high tea', 'supper', and 'elevenses', because these people have nothing else to do but to eat more frequently throughout the day.
    What's elevenses? Someone I worked with always went out in the morning for "elevenses". I never asked what it meant just thought it was her personal name for her break. I didn't realise it was a "thing".
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    I always say dinner. Tea is a drink to me and nothing more.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    Lol @ all the narrow minded southern-Englanders itt :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by drowzee)
    Or because dinner makes more sense...?
    If we were standing around picking out things which didn't make sense, we'd have to inquire as to the logic contained in a question mark preceded by an ellipsis. Some things simply evolve to be.
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    Breakfast, Lunch, Cheeky Nandos
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    (Original post by elliemayxo)
    I understand the whole 'afternoon tea' thing, it's like when you go to a posh restaurant you book into have 'afternoon tea' which are the things you said.

    But there's a difference between afternoon tea and an actual meal which is dinner.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    In the UK, dinner would normally refer to the main meal of the day, irrespective of the time of day at which it is eaten.

    Tea on the other hand can mean several difference things:
    - It may simply refer to the drink.
    - It may refer to Afternoon tea, which is a particular style of light meal, traditionally eaten at Tea time.
    - It may refer to a main meal, traditionally known as High tea and eaten in the early evening.

    Source
    Pretty much what I said (excluding the drinking tea)
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    (Original post by TwinnyP)
    If it was a choice between "Dinner" and "sunflower" I would agree. Because that would not make sense to have Breakfast, dinner, sunflower. But it's not. And that's why half the country call it dinner and the other half call it tea.

    If it made no sense, it wouldn't be popularly used.
    It still doesn't make sense though. If people are referring to afternoon tea with the cakes and scones then I can understand, but most people do not drink tea with their dinner. I know it's a commonly used word, so it's not going to change. I just don't see the logic behind it.
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    The Northern half of my family say dinner for the midday meal and tea for the evening meal. The Southern half say lunch and dinner.
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    Defiantly Dinner. Saying tea doesn't seem right.
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    Guys can we throw supper into the mix as well?
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    meal 1, meal 2, meal 3, meal 4, meal 5
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    (Original post by Tpos)
    What's elevenses? Someone I worked with always went out in the morning for "elevenses". I never asked what it meant just thought it was her personal name for her break. I didn't realise it was a "thing".
    It's just a snack or pastry or something at 11 o'clock
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    (Original post by TrayBaker)
    Defiantly Dinner. Saying tea doesn't seem right.
    What a peculiar act of defiance. You're a hero.
 
 
 
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