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I'm a Computer Programer AMA watch

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    (Original post by gijops)
    MATE, mate, mate........................

    forget c++
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    Funny, but I was serious
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    (Original post by gijops)
    1) Most well-known language
    <answer here>


    2) How long you been 'grammin?
    <answer here>


    3) Do you study it at uni?
    <answer here>
    C#

    9 Years

    Studied BSc.Computer Science
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    (Original post by TheMaster102)
    C#

    9 Years

    Studied BSc.Computer Science
    well then, I thought you were a noob but I thought wrong... Where do you work now if you don't mind me asking? don't have to be specific I'm just wondering on the industry, the demands, and other day-to-day stuff
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    (Original post by bailfire)
    I meant with logical thinking and problem solving - in that sense. Syntax isn't that hard to learn to be honest, especially with things like Intellisense spoon feeding you.

    Haven't done any programming in C++ though, I look forward to learn it when I can.
    C++ is very temperamental in my experience and bad for things like Agile or RAD because it's a lot more strict.

    It is really, REALLy fast though. You get the best of both worlds with the high level functionality and class based OOP paradigm, but in my opinion it's a lot more low level than something like Java to be described as a high level language.

    C++ skills will get you in the top paid jobs, but they will be difficult and you'll usually need a lot more not just C++.

    You hit the nail on the head when you said that programming is about logical thinking. I think what makes you a good programmer is how you solve problems and find solutions, learning the language is just one step in the journey. That's something you only get with experience. I have to say also; it's the most rewarding thing about programming, it's like a constant puzzle, it requires innovation and creativity and that's what makes it so beautiful IMO
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    (Original post by gijops)
    well then, I thought you were a noob but I thought wrong... Where do you work now if you don't mind me asking? don't have to be specific I'm just wondering on the industry, the demands, and other day-to-day stuff
    So throughout uni I sort of worked as an indie developer of apps, mostly games. Many are on the internet and some have over a million plays. I earnt a few grand but not anything huge like millions.

    I graduated recently and have just got a graduate role at Barclays which is starting soon, I'll be working for a year to save up for my masters MSc. Computer science at queen mary which I've already thankfully been accepted into Can't wait for that. I then hope to do a PhD in Computer Science and eventually become a professor (maybe) and researcher.

    I'll also have the free time to do what I love (making apps and games) while in education and hopefully hit the jackpot one day, but if not it's cool cause I love doing it anyway
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    (Original post by TheMaster102)
    C++ is very temperamental in my experience and bad for things like Agile or RAD because it's a lot more strict.

    It is really, REALLy fast though. You get the best of both worlds with the high level functionality and class based OOP paradigm, but in my opinion it's a lot more low level than something like Java to be described as a high level language.

    C++ skills will get you in the top paid jobs, but they will be difficult and you'll usually need a lot more not just C++.

    You hit the nail on the head when you said that programming is about logical thinking. I think what makes you a good programmer is how you solve problems and find solutions, learning the language is just one step in the journey. That's something you only get with experience. I have to say also; it's the most rewarding thing about programming, it's like a constant puzzle, it requires innovation and creativity and that's what makes it so beautiful IMO
    Yep, anyone can learn the language and become okay at it. The same way anyone can learn English, but only the gifted will become a successful author! Its about trying to make the most of what you have at your disposal. The opportunities are literally endless when it comes to programming.
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    (Original post by TheMaster102)
    So throughout uni I sort of worked as an indie developer of apps, mostly games. Many are on the internet and some have over a million plays. I earnt a few grand but not anything huge like millions.

    I graduated recently and have just got a graduate role at Barclays which is starting soon, I'll be working for a year to save up for my masters MSc. Computer science at queen mary which I've already thankfully been accepted into Can't wait for that. I then hope to do a PhD in Computer Science and eventually become a professor (maybe) and researcher.

    I'll also have the free time to do what I love (making apps and games) while in education and hopefully hit the jackpot one day, but if not it's cool cause I love doing it anyway
    Very interesting, I'm in a similar position to you... Indie app developer and I'm about to start my final year of Software Engineering.. I got 2 modules at a first last year so it's paved the way for me to finish with a first (I got the same aspirations to do a master's course like you)

    How much harder would you say 3rd year is compared to 2nd year? and whatn uni did you do your Bsc if you don't mind me asking?
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    (Original post by kka25)
    : /

    What were they looking for? What was it that they think you cannot do? What did you say to the recruiter?
    Well a lot of the firms are elitist and unfortunately this is just how the world works. I personally wasn't phased because to be honest I don't want to join a firm with such attitudes anyway, it shows a sort of callous and hierachical mindset behind the management which probably translates into an unfriendly and stressful work environment.

    I told the recruiter i thought it was silly to think that someone who went to a better uni is a better than me, explained my experience and portfolio of apps. He then silenced his scepticism and told me he'd forward my CV to the role and vouch for me.

    Probably wont take the role, I am literally inundated with calls from recruiters, I get about 3-5 a day. It's so bad that sometimes I turn off my phone to avoid them. I think if you have computer skills these days you're really sought after. I've even taken to taking a piss whilst talking to the recruiters because I do it so often that I'm not at all fussed or phased with getting the job, especially since most of them are useless, don't even read your CV and just ask the same questions you've answered a million times.
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    (Original post by TheMaster102)
    I think if you have computer skills these days you're really sought after.
    Are they good pay though, or typical graduate salaries? Problem is, these days there are so many countries with a bad economy but a good education system. So many UK companies are hiring Spanish, Greeks, Polish, Portuguese etc. like it's out of fashion; especially grads. Very few countries offer much protection to the skilled workers e.g. NZ is the same, but replace Europeans with Chinese. Australia is an exception though.

    So if your skill is just knowing how to program well, I don't think your salaries will ever be that high as labor can always be imported just when there's a major shortage. Getting domain knowledge, a niche skill, becoming a contractor are all ways to bump it up. I am still at the ~beginning of that road btw, but I am pretty sure this is how it works based on what my dad has said (he can make 30k in a month sometimes).
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    (Original post by gijops)
    Very interesting, I'm in a similar position to you... Indie app developer and I'm about to start my final year of Software Engineering.. I got 2 modules at a first last year so it's paved the way for me to finish with a first (I got the same aspirations to do a master's course like you)

    How much harder would you say 3rd year is compared to 2nd year? and whatn uni did you do your Bsc if you don't mind me asking?
    Can't tell you my uni I'm afraid, don't want to be identified. The only reason I wont put my apps here on the thread is I don't want people to know who I am.

    If you PM me I'll send you some stuff.

    I went to a mid-tier uni but have an offer from Queen Mary for MSc. Computer Science which I'll be doing in 2016

    In terms of hardness, 3rd year was as hard as 2nd year, but with much more work. We were made to write a 20k report in addition to our project for the final year. This 20k report was due in 2 weeks before the exams so I had very little time to revise. I have not known anyone who had to write the amount we did, my school worked us unfairly hard and I am a bit bitter about my university experience to be honest.

    Nonetheless I have the degree and am going to a much better one for my postgrad, so **** it haha

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    Okay, so I've got a few:

    1) Was it your plan to become a computer programmer when first considering your career, uni choices etc.?
    2) Did you ever have any doubts about your decision once you'd made it?
    3) What made you decide to become a computer programmer?
    4) How do you find it now? Do you enjoy it? What do you like and dislike about the job?

    Hope this isn't too much to ask. I think you can understand why I'm asking these questions Oh, isn't it fun to be clueless as to your future... :/
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    (Original post by elohssa_41)
    Are they good pay though, or typical graduate salaries? Problem is, these days there are so many countries with a bad economy but a good education system. So many UK companies are hiring Spanish, Greeks, Polish, Portuguese etc. like it's out of fashion; especially grads. Very few countries offer much protection to the skilled workers e.g. NZ is the same, but replace Europeans with Chinese. Australia is an exception though.

    So if your skill is just knowing how to program well, I don't think your salaries will ever be that high as labor can always be imported just when there's a major shortage. Getting domain knowledge, a niche skill, becoming a contractor are all ways to bump it up. I am still at the ~beginning of that road btw, but I am pretty sure this is how it works based on what my dad has said (he can make 30k in a month sometimes).
    The pay is 20-30k starting, 40k mid and 60k+

    I've seen senior java roles for 70-80k+

    The thing is web designers are easily imported, but the back end web developers and programmers are a lot harder to just simply import because you need very strong communication skills to do well.

    I think our jobs are safe because there is a huge shortage for programmers, even if people can import programmers, it's still a very high skill job, just like being a lawyer or a doctor, you need to have a lot of hard to gain skills that only so many would have the dedication or mind to achieve.

    I like to think anyone is "smart enough" to code, but I think a lot of people lack the dedication and the patience to really get good in my opinion because it's intimidating at first and has a steep learning curve, a lot of people simply don't have the mind for it, not that they're not intelligent enough but it takes a certain kind of mind to code I think, and it's not for everyone
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    (Original post by Do1phinDreamer)
    Okay, so I've got a few:

    1) Was it your plan to become a computer programmer when first considering your career, uni choices etc.?
    2) Did you ever have any doubts about your decision once you'd made it?
    3) What made you decide to become a computer programmer?
    4) How do you find it now? Do you enjoy it? What do you like and dislike about the job?

    Hope this isn't too much to ask. I think you can understand why I'm asking these questions Oh, isn't it fun to be clueless as to your future... :/
    I always wanted to be a programmer, ever since I saw the matrix, and from there I gained a fascination. I learnt at 13 luckily thanks to a book my dad had lying around about programming in flash.

    I doubted it at first year, first year was horrible, it was like I wasn't even studying computer science It was more like I was studying engineering. This is because my uni did the same first year for CS, engineering and robotics so our first year was a blend of these fields, and I hated engineering because it wasn't what I wanted to do and the maths was insane.

    I decided to become a programmer because I love making things, coding is amazing because it's like building machines with words, it's like solving puzzles all the time and is really fun. I'm also good at it and it's nice to be good at something haha I wasn't very strong academically but my programming skills saw me through my CS degree.

    I love it, it's the best. I have yet to work in a firm most of my work has been independant apps and stuff, and I love that. Working for someone else might be different so I'll have to get back to you on that
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    (Original post by TheMaster102)
    I always wanted to be a programmer, ever since I saw the matrix, and from there I gained a fascination. I learnt at 13 luckily thanks to a book my dad had lying around about programming in flash.

    I doubted it at first year, first year was horrible, it was like I wasn't even studying computer science It was more like I was studying engineering. This is because my uni did the same first year for CS, engineering and robotics so our first year was a blend of these fields, and I hated engineering because it wasn't what I wanted to do and the maths was insane.

    I decided to become a programmer because I love making things, coding is amazing because it's like building machines with words, it's like solving puzzles all the time and is really fun. I'm also good at it and it's nice to be good at something haha I wasn't very strong academically but my programming skills saw me through my CS degree.

    I love it, it's the best. I have yet to work in a firm most of my work has been independant apps and stuff, and I love that. Working for someone else might be different so I'll have to get back to you on that
    Thanks so much!
    I have been considering going into Computing and perhaps Computer Programming, but upon beginning an internship with my Dad's company (he's the CTO so it was pretty easy to obtain...), I quickly found that what I had learned in my GCSE was completely and utterly USELESS in real life application. I couldn't do a damn thing, and spent forever just making a basic calculator app (I had never worked with apps before, to be fair). It completely put me off and I became so anxious about it, I had to step back and give up on the internship :/
    Did you ever experience anything like this, or no? Any tips?
    Sorry to keep asking again and again, and thank you SO VERY MUCH for all your awesome input Xxxxx
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    (Original post by TheMaster102)
    Can't tell you my uni I'm afraid, don't want to be identified. The only reason I wont put my apps here on the thread is I don't want people to know who I am.

    If you PM me I'll send you some stuff.

    I went to a mid-tier uni but have an offer from Queen Mary for MSc. Computer Science which I'll be doing in 2016

    In terms of hardness, 3rd year was as hard as 2nd year, but with much more work. We were made to write a 20k report in addition to our project for the final year. This 20k report was due in 2 weeks before the exams so I had very little time to revise. I have not known anyone who had to write the amount we did, my school worked us unfairly hard and I am a bit bitter about my university experience to be honest.

    Nonetheless I have the degree and am going to a much better one for my postgrad, so **** it haha

    well.. you are a trooper.

    We have to a similar report. More like 8K words but its just a reflection of our final year project which is supposed to take 400 hours... are they serious? You know what I could build in Minecraft with 400 hours???
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    (Original post by Do1phinDreamer)
    Thanks so much!
    I have been considering going into Computing and perhaps Computer Programming, but upon beginning an internship with my Dad's company (he's the CTO so it was pretty easy to obtain...), I quickly found that what I had learned in my GCSE was completely and utterly USELESS in real life application. I couldn't do a damn thing, and spent forever just making a basic calculator app (I had never worked with apps before, to be fair). It completely put me off and I became so anxious about it, I had to step back and give up on the internship :/
    Did you ever experience anything like this, or no? Any tips?
    Sorry to keep asking again and again, and thank you SO VERY MUCH for all your awesome input Xxxxx
    Of course at first it will take forever and it will be hard, even doing the most basic of things will take hours if not days.

    You will eventually get better, there's so much to learn in programming that you have to learn yourself, stuff and techniques that you'll have to hone through experience. No one is building amazing apps at first, you have to have a solid work ethic and work really hard to learn, but it'll be easy when you learn.

    Don't give up, programmers are one thing from my experience, and that is not quitters. If you're a quitter you'll never be a programmer. You have to persevere through the most frustrating of tasks, and there will be moments you'll hit roadblocks. Google is your friend and you just have to google the error code you get to learn what you did wrong, you will almost never find an error without an answer somewhere online.

    You will learn something new every day, it will be hard, don't get me wrong but there's no reason you can't do it, being good logically can help a lot, but I think the most important thing for any aspiring programmer is to have patience, dedication and an ambition to learn that wont falter. Hope I helped.
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    (Original post by gijops)
    well.. you are a trooper.

    We have to a similar report. More like 8K words but its just a reflection of our final year project which is supposed to take 400 hours... are they serious? You know what I could build in Minecraft with 400 hours???
    If you want that first I think you should follow their tasks to the T. Just kill yourself in your final year and get that first, to be honest these days you need a first to get into the big grad schemes like microsoft. As I've said before I got a 2:2 and have been at a major disadvantage because of it.

    Luckily my portfolio of apps and 9 years experience has saved me and I've still had overwhelming employer interest and interest from recruiters. I do wish I had a first though so I could go on to Microsoft, which was my plan initially.

    I am hoping my masters will make up for my failings at undergrad. I got the poor grade because in my 2nd year I had a lot of problems in my life. In final year I got a 2:1 and a first in my project.

    The project really will help your average so work hard and best of luck to you
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    (Original post by TheMaster102)
    The most interesting topic I came across in undergrad was something called Evolutionary Computation.

    It's essentially using evolutionary algorithms and genetic programming to solve problems. it's very interesting and like most things in Computer Science is quite new.

    You traditionally have two ways of solving a problem, the top down way, which is basically trying to create a solution to the problem, the bottom up way however is an approach where you instead of programming a solution, you create a foundation of which the software automatically recursively improves itself in order to solve the solution.

    I hope I've explained this well, Evolutionary computation is a really interesting subject. I'm to start a master's next year in computer science and I will be doing my research in that field, specifically I hope to use genetic programming and apply it to artificial intelligence and machine learning and hopefully demonstrate that the two can be combined in this way.

    for my PhD i'll be doing something along similar lines I think. I think artificial intelligence and machine learning was another really interesting module so I seek to combine the two subjects in my postgrad studies, also because there is a tiny mad scientist within me that loves to create things and I think programming evolutionary agents and software will be a lot of fun
    You are about 30 years late. For more recent examples, check out the AI that learns to play any Atari game. One of these Atari playing AIs uses deep reinforcement (deep learning and reinforcement learning) and another uses neuroevolution (neural networks and genetic algorithms).

    Machine learning is mostly computer-powered stats peppered with some calculus to learn from (ideally) cleaned datasets. Are you good with stats?
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    (Original post by TheMaster102)
    I use programmer to distinguish myself from web developers, which is a mistake a lot of people make, I really only dabble in application programming, so programming things for android and stuff like that.

    I don't think web development is programming, i see it as more scripting and wish people would make the distinction more because it causes a lot of confusion. The two are very different.
    What's your definition of scripting? *Do you realise that some browsers compile JS right? Seeing how most developers have to use JS eventually, why would you not call them programmers just because they also write markup? Note that Android folks also write markup* (see xml) yet you are happy to call Android folks programmers.

    Summary
    Web folk: markup and programming*
    Android folk: markup* and programming
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    (Original post by bailfire)
    Very interesting. We share similar interests in machine learning and A.I - I think all devs have a strong interest in those fields.
    I guess that interest is not strong enough to pursue it professionally.
 
 
 
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