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    Many have been through similar nightmares. The attitude and attributes which got you into this will also get you through. I'm guessing that includes grit and hard work. Head down focus work harder than everyone else. You've probably been doing it for years. Now you step through the gears. Just one tip - stop watching the clock. Your comment about 6 hours raises questions. Work whatever hours are required until you have got to where you need to be. Many many others will be doing all nighters when necessary.
    You'll also find that many guys who came from private schools will respect you when you start producing quality work. So the social side will sort itself out as you bring yourself up to speed.
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    (Original post by Star Light)
    Hey prospective Cambridge students,

    I've just started a Medicine degree at Cambridge, we're 2 weeks in now. A quick summary of my experience so far:

    -Anatomy is ridiculous. There are so many things to learn. Just so so many. I spend a lot of time studying anatomy outside of dissections and lectures, just hours on end in my room with some bones and Gray's anatomy. And my supervisor still says I'm clearly not going over it and I should know more.

    -The other two main topics (biochemistry and physiology) are very vague. I've no idea what remotely is actually part of this course. The lectures jump between so many topics and it's very unclear what is a passing note of interest, and what you should learn inside out. I know they say there's no specification and it's self-guided learning, but I don't even know where to begin.

    -Every other person doing Medicine at my college went to a fee-paying school, and many of the other people here did too. I've been in bottom of the pile state schools all my life, and it makes a difference. Their conversations, interests, and social behaviours are just different and I do feel very excluded. There are some decent people though! It's just that if I try to talk to some people, generally they seem to lose interest very quickly and go to find someone who's from their background - nothing like people at home.

    -It's very posh. People's backgrounds asides, there are fancy buildings everywhere, people wear gowns to formal dinners and a lot of wine and port is served, and I just feel like I'd much rather be at home working like I did in the Summer on farms or cleaning the floor at my leisure centre.

    -It's just very stressful. I've never been particularly stressed in life before, or felt at all mentally weak - I'm proud of my resilience - but the combined pressures are getting to me here! I'm certainly not depressed or clinically anxious, but stress is a real thing now.

    I'm hoping that this will all become more normal as the weeks pass, because I do not want 6 years of a degree if this is how it will continue. I'm not opposed to doing lots of work - and in fact, I am doing a lot (probably a good 6 hours per day outside of contact time), but it just isn't happening. Anyway, it's all well and good to get an offer for Cambridge, and if you get an offer then you'll probably find A-Levels an absolute doddle like I did. Just be aware that it is genuinely intense here, particularly if you're from a peasant background like me
    I'm applying for Natural Sciences at Cambridge and the main thing that worries me is the whether I'll cope with the workload!
    My brother is a 4th year medical student at UCL and for his first and second years he had 9am-5pm lectures/tutorials every day, and worked every evening at home, often until midnight. I get the impression that there's just such a massive mountain of stuff you've gotta learn at the beginning that that's the only way to do it.
    My sister is in her 3rd year doing PBS at Cambridge - she says that all through her first year her supervisors told her that she wasn't working hard enough/that her essays were rubbish....she ended up coming top of the year in the exams!
    So I'd say, keep your head down, keep plugging away, you deserve to be there and you definitely won't be the only one finding it tough!
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    Oxbridge admissions is something it's very easy to get obsessive about (I know I certainly did) and the danger with that is that you form this idealised, perfect vision of Oxbridge where everything's going to be totally wonderful if (and only if) you get in - and you end up with tunnel vision with getting in as your only aim, without actually thinking realistically about what it's going to be like living and working there. Obviously most students do end up being happy there (I'm very sorry about Star Light's less than pleasant experience, I'm sure things will get better) but at least for me, the first week or so was definitely a bit of a reality check!
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    Think of your hard work as an investment. Medicine at Cambridge? You're pretty much guaranteed to be rich lol!
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    (Original post by gwagon)
    Think of your hard work as an investment. Medicine at Cambridge? You're pretty much guaranteed to be rich lol!
    As opposed to Medicine at UEA, where you'll be poor?
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    (Original post by FFTypoCorrector)
    As opposed to Medicine at UEA, where you'll be poor?
    I never said that, but Cambridge looks better than UEA.
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    (Original post by gwagon)
    I never said that, but Cambridge looks better than UEA.
    They get paid the same... Bro, this isn't banking we're talking about lol - a doctor is a doctor.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    They get paid the same... Bro, this isn't banking we're talking about lol - a doctor is a doctor.

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    But the student from Cambridge is more likely to get the spot than one from UEA.
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    (Original post by gwagon)
    But the student from Cambridge is more likely to get the spot than one from UEA.
    Every medic is guaranteed a foundation year job; the speciality ones later on are more a function of your interest/clear motivation for that area.

    There have been some stats on here about the correlation with the university one went to and probability of doing well on professional exams, yeah, but in terms of jobs it's a fairly even field. As I said, a doctor is a doctor - they'll both be in demand anywhere they go.

    If this were for any other career, I would agree but medicine is completely different in the sense that the quality of entrants doesn't vary as greatly between different universities as much as it does in other subjects.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Every medic is guaranteed a foundation year job; the speciality ones later on are more a function of your interest/clear motivation for that area.

    There have been some stats on here about the correlation with the university one went to and probability of doing well on professional exams, yeah, but in terms of jobs it's a fairly even field. As I said, a doctor is a doctor - they'll both be in demand anywhere they go.

    If this were for any other career, I would agree but medicine is completely different in the sense that the quality of entrants doesn't vary as greatly between different universities as much as it does in other subjects.
    No don't say that, that's blasphemy on here, the 18 year old prospective students know the ins and outs of what employers look for, and it's definitely all about which university you go to!
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    For the 2014 admissions cycle for Medicine there were 145 state school admissions, 78 independent school admissions and 45 others (including all other home such as from FE etc). 2013 it was similar (I can't find 2015 atm).
    Emmanuel college overall has 63% maintained school entrants.
    http://www.undergraduate.study.cam.a...2014_cycle.pdf

    I think the shock of arriving at Cambridge is huge, the more so if you have been exceptionally academic at a non-selective school. If you went to one of those few schools where 30-50 people went to Oxbridge every year you would already be used to competing with people of similar or higher ability all the time.
    It can also be a huge shock moving from one part of the country to another with a different social or ethnic mix to your home town. Cambridge, let alone Medicine is notoriously intense but one gets used to it and most people do work much harder than for A levels. Medicine itself is a culture shock and I definitely saw my friends change as they became doctors rather than just students in a way that didn't maybe affect the rest of us as much.

    If a private pupil expressed instant dislike of virtually all state pupils, or even said they felt uncomfortable mixing with people who were of different backgrounds we would probably be outraged. We would tell that that coping with change and learning to get on with a variety of people without judging was part of life, let alone essential in medicine.

    Don't forget some of those private school pupils are probably also terrified by the new world even if they hide it , and take security from what is familiar-people like them. I'm sure you will find yourself able to adjust and maybe the experience will help you when in the future somebody is intimidated by you because you are that scary thing "A DOCTOR".
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    (Original post by Star Light)
    Hey prospective Cambridge students,

    I've just started a Medicine degree at Cambridge, we're 2 weeks in now. A quick summary of my experience so far:

    -Anatomy is ridiculous. There are so many things to learn. Just so so many. I spend a lot of time studying anatomy outside of dissections and lectures, just hours on end in my room with some bones and Gray's anatomy. And my supervisor still says I'm clearly not going over it and I should know more.

    -The other two main topics (biochemistry and physiology) are very vague. I've no idea what remotely is actually part of this course. The lectures jump between so many topics and it's very unclear what is a passing note of interest, and what you should learn inside out. I know they say there's no specification and it's self-guided learning, but I don't even know where to begin.

    -Every other person doing Medicine at my college went to a fee-paying school, and many of the other people here did too. I've been in bottom of the pile state schools all my life, and it makes a difference. Their conversations, interests, and social behaviours are just different and I do feel very excluded. There are some decent people though! It's just that if I try to talk to some people, generally they seem to lose interest very quickly and go to find someone who's from their background - nothing like people at home.

    -It's very posh. People's backgrounds asides, there are fancy buildings everywhere, people wear gowns to formal dinners and a lot of wine and port is served, and I just feel like I'd much rather be at home working like I did in the Summer on farms or cleaning the floor at my leisure centre.

    -It's just very stressful. I've never been particularly stressed in life before, or felt at all mentally weak - I'm proud of my resilience - but the combined pressures are getting to me here! I'm certainly not depressed or clinically anxious, but stress is a real thing now.

    I'm hoping that this will all become more normal as the weeks pass, because I do not want 6 years of a degree if this is how it will continue. I'm not opposed to doing lots of work - and in fact, I am doing a lot (probably a good 6 hours per day outside of contact time), but it just isn't happening. Anyway, it's all well and good to get an offer for Cambridge, and if you get an offer then you'll probably find A-Levels an absolute doddle like I did. Just be aware that it is genuinely intense here, particularly if you're from a peasant background like me
    Hello there!
    I can't really give you any other advise than doing your best. That's what can be expected from you, end of story. I can, however, let you know that I'm in a similar position. I just started medschool this September, and let me tell you, anatomy is intense wherever you decide to get your medical degree in. There's nothing else to it than just memorise all those features and know it by heart. You should try the sobotta atlas though. In my opinion it's better and most of my professors recommend it.

    I'm guessing your anatomical terms are in English? I didn't get accepted in the UK so I'm studying in Riga atm, at RSU. And trust me, I've never been depressed in my life but this place nearly got me there. It all comes in waves, so I'm fine right now but there is no guarantee I won't want to leave all of this behind tomorrow or next week. Again.

    I'm in a similar position as you since I don't want to waste six years of my life without enjoying myself, but I was lucky with the social aspect of it all. There are people from all around the world here, including the UK and Ireland, so I'm trying to use my friends as a motivation to stay and keep fighting.

    Btw I know it's annoying when people are too posh and narcissistic but remember this, you're "just" a farm girl that got admitted into Cambridge! I think, if you just managed to find a handful of close friends, you'll like it there.

    If you want to talk about anything, even if it's just to rant, feel free to message me. Since we're both freshers at medschool, maybe we could exchange survival tips
    //Em.
 
 
 
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