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How do you suceed when you are mentally ill? watch

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    (Original post by Eggs20)
    What do you even say to your GP? Did you just make an appointment one day and said you were depressed or something?
    Firstly I had counselling for a medical issue that was partially psychological. During my first session with that counsellor, various other stuff came out that revealed how unhappy I was which is when she told me to talk to my GP about it. The GP then referred me to a counselling service who then assessed me using a depression scale.

    I suggest you go to your GP and just talk to them about how you are feeling. Some GPs are more clued up about mental health than others, so if you don't feel like you are getting anywhere, ask to see someone else. Don't try and self-diagnose because you tend to think the worst.
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    It's hard to not care when your mental illness means you're desperate for validation.
    Yeah that is true.
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    (Original post by Emily.97)
    Why did you mention mental illness in the title?

    Lets not make this in to something it isn't. Think about what motivates you and what tends to trigger you to become distracted. You're a third year student so it may be worth reflecting on the past few years. I've found i, personally, have to monitor my behaviour quite carefully to solve these problems.
    I just believe it is a mental illness. Just by the way my mindset has completely changed and the negative thoughts I obsess over on a daily basis that makes it hard to function.
    Its not that I am being lazy when it comes to work. Its not that I can't be bothered doing this more like I can't concentrate.
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    I think having severe suicidal thoughts as a reaction to meds is a less common side effect, so I wouldn't let that put you off by itself! :nah: It's a scary prospect of taking meds at first, I understand that. But think of it this way - would you be so hesitant if you were a diabetic patient needing insulin? There are certain meds out there that can help us fix our bodies - therefore it's in our best interests to explore all avenues and take the meds if needed. If it does turn out that a particular med is making you suicidal, you can just slowly tail off that med and start another one - it's not like there's only one med out there

    Are your uni's disability office not nice or something?
    Suppose there is nothing wrong with trying it and stopping if I get bad side effects.

    Its not that they are not nice its just feels hard going back again when I went there last year- Almost like I should have moved on by now.
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    You succeed by tackling your mental health. I would go see your doctor and explain the situation. Don't try and self diagnose, especially stuff like ADD, depression, anxiety, stress, even poor lifestyle, can all cause poor concentration and motivation. Honestly, my experience is that the first thing you need to do is try and force yourself to start doing things, sitting around for hours will only make you feel worse. Make sure you're eating, drinking (non alcoholic drinks), sleeping, and exercising well and this will help you. Then try and ignore the negative thoughts, tell yourself they're not true even if you don't believe it, and try and take some positive steps e.g. make a to do list, tidy your flat, buy something you need... start small and build up to getting small work tasks completed, and reward yourself by doing something nice afterwards.
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    (Original post by Eggs20)
    Suppose there is nothing wrong with trying it and stopping if I get bad side effects.

    Its not that they are not nice its just feels hard going back again when I went there last year- Almost like I should have moved on by now.
    To use my diabetes example again, though - if you had diabetes and you went to a doctor a year after they'd first seen you, they wouldn't expect the diabetes to have gone :nah: Don't be so hard on yourself :hugs:
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    (Original post by Eggs20)
    Did that help you?
    Yeah, I now have a graduate position in a very well respected surveyors firm.
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    Personally:snap out of it; sounds blunt, but it actually works.
    This is from personal experience: warning TL;DR
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    My grandfather, who was a former soldier gave me a pretty spartan education when he raised me from age 6 to 14. After my parents came back from abroad I became a bit more libertine and rebellious, and once I found myself living on my own at uni,I became even more irresponsible.
    My attendance record was clean, I did not drink or party often. However, I was quite reclusive and I am not ashamed to admit that I was not the best with organising my workload or my meals/ workouts.
    I slept as much as I wanted, which often led to me running to lectures because I didn't allow myself enough time to eat/get ready. I read only what I wanted (even though I am very engaged with academia and I read mostly peer reviewed articles and primary/secondary sources; I just didn't engage that much with my textbooks as I found them rather simple, or even too biased for my taste). If I wanted to watch an episode of one of my favourite TV series I did, however, if I wanted to start working on something I would always put that in second place. I also spent a lot of time cooking and drawing/listening to music, as this helped me alleviate my anxiety.
    I was always in top 10 (of 150 students) in History, and I was doing pretty well in IR as well (I even got the highest score in the history of that assessment in 2 electronic exams :smug:) but I knew that I didn't put as much effort as I could have. I always finished my assignments last minute, and the only drive to make me work on them was the impending deadline.
    I abhorred myself for that. I wanted to work more, give all my best- but I was mostly vacant. Always thinking about things in my life (whether past or present), hating myself, being too scared and self conscious to have the boost I needed to get me going.
    This year, I decided I had enough of my past self. I now have a planner (not for every second of my life, but key tasks I want to go through daily- a certain amount of reading from compulsory materials and leisure reading, on what days I'm going shopping, work out every morning, etc.) and it really worked. I never believed people - including my grandfather- whenever they said "motivation is all that it takes" but it's true. I never snooze my alarm again; I jump out of bed immediately and do a quick 10 minute workout; then I have an invigorating shower. I plan my breakfast the night before and I always wake up hungry, so I can't wait to fix myself something. I have a meal planner that saves me a lot of money and time thinking what to eat. I basically write down the ingredients that I have and the things that I can make out of them, and I write down in another corner what ingredients I need or am running out of. I allow myself 2 hours leisure time (do whatever I want- although I am allowing myself to stretch it for up to anothe hour if I am doing something somewhat productive or engaging- such as working on a drawing) and 2 for reading academic and non academic work (minimum; I usually exceed this). By scheduling how much leisure time I get every day I make sure that I enjoy myself, as well as not procrastinate. By scheduling how much I need to read a day makes me committed to doing just that, and not postpone it any further. I also have a bit of time left at night to talk to my folks, and I allow myself a couple of hours every week to groom myself (masks, shaving, etc.- I am a female after all).Bottom line: I am, to some extent, immitating parts of my schedule grandpa had for me. I was a very productive and quite successful child whilst my grandparents took care of me, and now I know why. They allowed me to have fun every day, but at the same time made me engage in some commitments.
    Formally: (as someone already mentioned) let your university know.

    I started year 1 last year with a first class average, but near the end of it I found out that my father was very ill, student finance kept delaying my grant and my finances were in peril.
    I lost total focus and ambition, and I was also very malnutritioned, as I thought I did not deserve to eat (I was an idiot, don't judge).
    I had let my personal tutor know of my situation in November last year; even though I had first class after first class, I felt something was wrong with me and he advised me to go to counselling. I did, and I informed my counsellor about my state weekly.
    By March I had a mental crisis. Last time I was clinically depressed I barely got out of it, and I thought I couldn't handle it by myself once more. My lecturers, as well as university staff were extremely helpful and supportive. They allowed me to splinter my first year into two, in order to get a job (that will give me some extra money), and at the same time deal with my family problems. Moreover, if I will finish year 1 this year with an A*, I might be eligible for a nice 2k merit grant :cute:.
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    You use it, instead of hating it, you use it to help you to succeed. Like some comedians use depression with their comedy


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    https://fuelforfreedom.wordpress.com...mental-health/
 
 
 
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