Turn on thread page Beta

Is It Illegal To Do This In England? watch

Announcements
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thecatwithnohat)
    Yes. :indiff:
    Well I regret to inform you that I no longer attend university. I work for a bank now, the first letter of their name is B.
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    20
    Welcome Squad
    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    Well I regret to inform you that I no longer attend university. I work for a bank now, the first letter of their name is B.
    Oh :indiff: how could you lead me on like that? :indiff:

    what the :hand: every bank in the world is pretty much in that list.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thecatwithnohat)
    Oh :indiff: how could you lead me on like that? :indiff:

    what the :hand: every bank in the world is pretty much in that list.
    I don't tell anyone online where I work, but I will give you a clue. It is not a UK bank.
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    20
    Welcome Squad
    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    I don't tell anyone online where I work, but I will give you a clue. It is not a UK bank.
    Don't worry, it'd be silly of you to tell me and/or for me to even expect an answer. :lol:
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thecatwithnohat)
    Don't worry, it'd be silly of you to tell me and/or for me to even expect an answer. :lol:
    To be honest it would be pretty difficult to find me in a company with over 100,000 employees. But I'm sure that is enough information for a curious mind like yours.
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    20
    Welcome Squad
    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    To be honest it would be pretty difficult to find me in a company with over 100,000 employees. But I'm sure that is enough information for a curious mind like yours.
    thanks for being so generous.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thecatwithnohat)
    thanks for being so generous.
    You seem to be very curious about me. For reasons unknown.
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    20
    Welcome Squad
    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    You seem to be very curious about me. For reasons unknown.
    Not very curious, but you seem interesting
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thecatwithnohat)
    Not very curious, but you seem interesting
    What I find strange is you are not the first person on here to take an interest in me. I don't what it is that makes people interested in me when there is nothing mysterious about me.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CCC75)
    This sounded so much like Rumpole of the Bailey that I involuntarily snorted as I laughed! Please accept my admiring rep points.
    Somehow I'd never discovered that programme, so accept a rep in return for introducing me to it!
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    20
    Welcome Squad
    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    What I find strange is you are not the first person on here to take an interest in me. I don't what it is that makes people interested in me when there is nothing mysterious about me.
    Oh right haha, I stand corrected. Nevermind then.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    Seems perfectly legal, in fact it happen at uni in halls. Once with horse's head and the other with a badger (although that one was illegal).
    Interestingly, there was an "incident" with a dead badger at my uni too. Unsurprisingly, agricultural students were involved, and my God did they got into a hell of a lot of trouble for it.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Greenlaner)
    Interestingly, there was an "incident" with a dead badger at my uni too. Unsurprisingly, agricultural students were involved, and my God did they got into a hell of a lot of trouble for it.
    Ag students do get up to the most fun. As far as I am aware nobody got in trouble over that incident. Someone did get in trouble over a minor bitumen incident thought. Silly farmers.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nolofinwë)
    I do not believe an inanimate chattel can cause him to apprehend immediate violence/contact. While he could come into contact with it, it is not able to (threaten to) inflict the contact on him, as would be necessary for assault. Once again, the issue of consent would also arise.
    R v Ireland presents some doubt here. If a series of phone calls can amount to assault, where there is no absolutely clear indication that battery would occur, yet V perceives battery shall immediately occur and this apprehension amounts to assault, then it absolutely should be the case that V can apprehend immediate battery because of a highly offensive item placed into V's personal space but nevertheless where there is no absolutely clear indication that battery would immediately occur and the person who causes such an apprehension is criminally liable for assault.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by callum_law)
    R v Ireland presents some doubt here. If a series of phone calls can amount to assault, where there is no absolutely clear indication that battery would occur, yet V perceives battery shall immediately occur and this apprehension amounts to assault, then it absolutely should be the case that V can apprehend immediate battery because of a highly offensive item placed into V's personal space but nevertheless where there is no absolutely clear indication that battery would immediately occur and the person who causes such an apprehension is criminally liable for assault.
    I had pondered Ireland (and Burstow and Constanza) for a while before writing my reply. Forgive me if the following is utter nonsense because this isn't my area of research and I haven't read Ireland for a number of years.

    The way I understand Lord Steyn's speech in Ireland is that he placed very special emphasis on the nature of human-to-human communication by words or conduct. His point was that if the offender's directly observed conduct can constitute an assault, so should the offender's words, either through their threatening content or their omission, because both have the same effect - necessary for assault - that they cause the victim to believe that they will be immediately subject to violence. I think the example which Lord Steyn gave is that if a person says down the phone 'I'll be at your house in a minute' in a threatening manner, it causes the victim to perceive that they are about to be assaulted. To me, the common thread running through this is the directness of the communicated threat - the offender, through his threatening words or omission to speak - causes the victim to believe that she could be physically assaulted by him at any minute.

    By contrast, a horses head in a bed is not a direct offender-to-victim communication. While it has the potential to be threatening, I don't think it would cause the apprehension of immediate violence; generally, finding an inanimate chattel somewhere unexpected does not cause me to assume that their is in all probability an assailant lurking in the immediate vicinity. While a horse's head is particularly unusual and culturally significant given its use in the Godfather, I still don't believe that the threat entailed is of immediate violence. It does not, to me, expressly or implicitly suggest violence to the person (as opposed to the horse), because there is no necessary or even clear characteristic about the presence of a horse's head that suggests someone is to be assaulted. It is a threat of something, but not necessarily or clearly physical violence. More significantly, it does not suggest immediate violence. If a person has had the opportunity to plant the severed head in my bed, they presumably had the opportunity to apply violence there and then, but chose not to do so. Therefore, I would not apprehend that they would wait for me to wake and discover the severed head, and assault me immediately thereafter. While, therefore, it can be symbolically threatening, I don't believe that it reasonably (to a standard sufficient to accuse the perpetrator of recklessness) implies a threat of either (i) immediate or (ii) necessary/probable violence, especially since it is, at best, indirect communication through symbolism.

    There are also a few minor rationales which seem to limit the outcome in Ireland to direct communication, if I remember correctly. Lord Steyn talks of silent or threatening telephone calls as being a particular social menace, so something special which for policy reasons must be addressed. He also notes the special statutory treatment of threatening telecommunications.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ihatePE)
    it's not very hilarious for the horse is it
    Why the long face?
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    Ag students do get up to the most fun. As far as I am aware nobody got in trouble over that incident. Someone did get in trouble over a minor bitumen incident thought. Silly farmers.
    They probably would have gotten away with it had they just pulled their prank on another student, but they decided to pull it on one of the most powerful faculty members in the college. :no:
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Greenlaner)
    They probably would have gotten away with it had they just pulled their prank on another student, but they decided to pull it on one of the most powerful faculty members in the college. :no:
    You can't fault them for aiming high. At college after I left, the agric students rounded all the sheep and painted them blue with stock marker. Needless to say the college was not best impressed, but they couldn't kick out an entire year of students.
 
 
 
Poll
Do you think parents should charge rent?
Useful resources
AtCTs

Ask the Community Team

Got a question about the site content or our moderation? Ask here.

Welcome Lounge

Welcome Lounge

We're a friendly bunch. Post here if you're new to TSR.

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.