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Computer Science vs Economics vs Engineering watch

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    My opinion is this, theres a lot of peopl doing economics/business now and the reality is this, this country needs more engineering skills and manufacturing so i would suggest going along that route. Good luck x
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    OK so the thing is you can go into the field of economics if you do Engineering/CS but not vice versa.
    No. You need an Economics degree to become a professional Economist. Another clueless student.

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    (Original post by Boy_wonder_95)
    No. You need an Economics degree to become a professional Economist. Another clueless student.

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    No I'm pretty sure an engineer/CS with lots of experience in finance sector can be an 'economist'. Engineers do more maths and application of maths then economist, with a little bit of experience in working in finance they can get into higher roles. CS/engineers will be better at stocks stuff than someone who took the economics degree, that's where all the money is at. Stocks and any good company decisions are now run of computer algorithms for optimisation and efficient, so if I say engineers/CS students are better suited I'm not wrong.




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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    No I'm pretty sure an engineer/CS with lots of experience in finance sector can be an 'economist'. Engineers do more maths and application of maths then economist, with a little bit of experience in working in finance they can get into higher roles. CS/engineers will be better at stocks stuff than someone who took the economics degree, that's where all the money is at. Stocks and any good company decisions are now run of computer algorithms for optimisation and efficient, so if I say engineers/CS students are better suited I'm not wrong.




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    I guess by your post you don't know what an Economist is, so I'd advise you do your research. And your acquaintance of the financial sector must be minimal if you believe most roles require any sort of complicated maths.

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    (Original post by Boy_wonder_95)
    And your acquaintance of the financial sector must be minimal if you believe most roles require any sort of complicated maths.

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    Well doesn't that even make life easier then, which means the job is opened to people without maths knowledge then, so with a few years of experience anyone from any type of degree could do the so called economist job you're talking about?

    Anyway I don't wanna change subject of the original post, goodluck OP


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    I feel that computer science would be a good balance but have been put off by a few things :

    1. That "it's hard work and time consuming and you are constantly working on computers (not broad like engineering )
    2. That I would have to do an extra year .
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    And here is what I have heard against doing engineering:

    It is very hard degree and does not give you free time yet the pay is average or similar to other degrees.
    That it is a boring degree with lots of maths.

    I dont know whether this all is true, and have no idea how to know?
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    (Original post by Oskar2000)
    And here is what I have heard against doing engineering:

    It is very hard degree and does not give you free time yet the pay is average or similar to other degrees.
    That it is a boring degree with lots of maths.

    I dont know whether this all is true, and have no idea how to know?
    You can't put boring in the same sentence with mathematics.
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    (Original post by Oskar2000)
    And here is what I have heard against doing engineering:

    It is very hard degree
    True
    and does not give you free time
    you do get free time just not as much as other degrees.
    yet the pay is average or similar to other degrees.
    it's only average if you make it. People who have a degree in engineering usually come out to be project managers, they are the boss of people who make the things, if you are qualified enough, you will get a top role which pays a lot. Or start your own company

    That it is a boring degree with lots of maths.
    It has a lot of maths but in no way is it boring! its only boring if you have no interest in it. I do engineering and I'm applying my knowledge to side projects in the uni, I've only been in uni for like 6 weeks and I'm already working with other people on an autonomous robot, racing car and a rocket engine. These are real projects with a lot of money and so far I'm enjoying being part of it. Hence I wouldn't call it boring.
    [/QUOTE]
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    True

    you do get free time just not as much as other degrees.

    it's only average if you make it. People who have a degree in engineering usually come out to be project managers, they are the boss of people who make the things, if you are qualified enough, you will get a top role which pays a lot. Or start your own company


    It has a lot of maths but in no way is it boring! its only boring if you have no interest in it. I do engineering and I'm applying my knowledge to side projects in the uni, I've only been in uni for like 6 weeks and I'm already working with other people on an autonomous robot, racing car and a rocket engine. These are real projects with a lot of money and so far I'm enjoying being part of it. Hence I wouldn't call it boring.
    [/QUOTE]

    I do agree with your comment that engineering is very real, but which is more dominant, the boring stuff or the fun/cool stuff?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Boy_wonder_95)
    I guess by your post you don't know what an Economist is, so I'd advise you do your research. And your acquaintance of the financial sector must be minimal if you believe most roles require any sort of complicated maths.

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    My Dad is an economist at a bank, but he has a degree in engineering.
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    True

    you do get free time just not as much as other degrees.

    it's only average if you make it. People who have a degree in engineering usually come out to be project managers, they are the boss of people who make the things, if you are qualified enough, you will get a top role which pays a lot. Or start your own company


    It has a lot of maths but in no way is it boring! its only boring if you have no interest in it. I do engineering and I'm applying my knowledge to side projects in the uni, I've only been in uni for like 6 weeks and I'm already working with other people on an autonomous robot, racing car and a rocket engine. These are real projects with a lot of money and so far I'm enjoying being part of it. Hence I wouldn't call it boring.
    [/QUOTE]

    That sounds amazing where do you go?
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    University of Southampton doing Aero&Astro engineering
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    University of Southampton doing Aero&Astro engineering
    Please correct me if I'm wrong but I have thought to myself that only people who are smart enjoy engineering and for those who are average see it as hard work and boring ?
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    What are the requirements for computer science?
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    (Original post by TJ154)
    What are the requirements for computer science?
    someone who can think analytically and have an abstract way of thinking and is good at maths-ish. Writing code is the least problem of a computer scientist, coming up with a good and efficient solution to a problem is the most important thing.


    grades wise it depends on uni but varies from a*aa to like bbb or even lower.
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    (Original post by Computer Geek)
    Yes, like I said before, computer science isn't a lot of programming at all, my degree (at University of Warwick) only has 1 module (of 10) which is programming, the rest are maths, data structures, etc.

    It really depends what you like doing at the end of the day. Most universities let you pick a lot of your options.
    I thought most universities make you apply the theory they teach you (data structures and all that etc) through programming and practising using those skills?
    I haven''t really researched into Comp Sci but correct me if I'm wrong
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    Computer science is more respected than engineering. Economics and CS are both equal IMO,in terms of respect and graduate opportunities and salary. Although this would depend on the uni of course, but generally computer science and economics are up there along with medicine as the highest salary for graduates. In terms of content, with both economics and computer sci as they're both very numerate you can do pretty much whatever you want. There are thousands of computer scientists that work as bankers or accountants, you don't have to do a finance or economics degree. Overall, I think you should do economics or computer sci as they are both 2 of the most solid degrees possible. Just think about if you would enjoy sitting on a computer most of the day in labs and lectures, or economics which is probably a mixture of debates, presentations and applying theory. Personally I'm going for computer science, but do love econ too.
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    (Original post by icedark_knight)
    lol... you realize you posted this on the engineering/technology forum? these guys are all biased... you'll get different answers if you post it in the economics forum... engineering is a pretty poor degree... not really that competitive and has average job prospects... I would advise economics, especially if you enjoy it...

    Economics is a pretty intellectual subject... Loads of maths and essays/constructing arguments/different viewpoints for everything... You have to understand theories really well... great deal of understanding... Go for it!
    thats just not true, chemical engineering at university of Aberdeen averages 47,000 after 40 months which is much higher than economics.
    Aberdeen is an exception as its well placed but University of Birmingha, which is ranked like 17th has a starting salary of 31k for chemical engineers with a year in industry according to unistats whereas economics, at Cambridge, the number 1 uni has a starting salary of 32k, just one thousand more even though its so much higher. Chemical engineers and Mechanical Engineers are best paid graduates on average after dentists and medical students
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    (Original post by 76584)
    thats just not true, chemical engineering at university of Aberdeen averages 47,000 after 40 months which is much higher than economics.
    Aberdeen is an exception as its well placed but University of Birmingha, which is ranked like 17th has a starting salary of 31k for chemical engineers with a year in industry according to unistats whereas economics, at Cambridge, the number 1 uni has a starting salary of 32k, just one thousand more even though its so much higher. Chemical engineers and Mechanical Engineers are best paid graduates on average after dentists and medical students
    While this is largely factually correct, can you explain why so few go for chemical engineering? At most universities, it's the smallest engineering department.
 
 
 
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