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I cannot decide between law and medicine watch

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    (Original post by spencer_param)
    at the end of the day, you're going to need experience in both fields before you reach a good salary and have 'friendly' working hours so that shouldn't affect your choice. I would say the fact that you want to help people and have a natural interest in medicine and surgery (as opposed to forcing yourself to enjoy it), you should go down that route- no one starts a medicine degree fully ready for the type of work and as you say, 'balancing chemical equations' and all that! just an opinion though!!

    I know I they do not hire people my age I need to be 16 I think.
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    (Original post by Mr JB)
    Not everyone in legal fields makes ridiculous amounts. In fact, its only really the top lawyers (partners usually) who do. The others have to do a ridiculous amount of overtime and take on other work to get ridiculously good pay. It doesn't pay as well as people think. Also, unless you love the law and talking about it and believe in it, then you're going to get bored with it in time. There is a lot of paperwork, ongoing training and procedures to be followed by the book. I love shows like Suits as much as the next person but they don't have show a onesided view of what working in the legal sector is really like. On top of that, the amount of debt you need to get yourself into to start off is ridiculous also. It really isn't the golden ticket many naive teenagers think it is, especially considering the market is full of law graduates, many of whom are struggling to get training contracts at big firms.


    This.
    same with doctors because you neither you need a high position consultant but you need lots of experience or you need to have money to open your own clinic.Doctors have one of the hardest and most respected jobs but their pay does not reflect their adversity.I will need to acknowledge that I will not live the lifestyle I would like.So I will pick the job I will enjoy most.My secodn question how does the job of a lawyer and barrister differ? Which one is better?
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    Don't do medicine. I say that as a medic. It will grind you down. I'm in my final year now and even the people that still love the subject will admit that the job itself sucks. Have you seen in the news how unhappy doctors are right now? Why would you want to be part of that?
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    You could become a medical lawyer
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    (Original post by swimandlift)
    Don't do medicine. I say that as a medic. It will grind you down. I'm in my final year now and even the people that still love the subject will admit that the job itself sucks. Have you seen in the news how unhappy doctors are right now? Why would you want to be part of that?
    Because I hope to finish medical school gain a bit experience and move to Singapore or Australia or work privately.I don't want to work for the NHS as they abuse their staff by making them work dangerous hours and not paying them what they deserve for the hours they work.
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    Because I hope to finish medical school gain a bit experience and move to Singapore or Australia or work privately.I don't want to work for the NHS as they abuse their staff by making them work dangerous hours and not paying them what they deserve for the hours they work.
    It costs the government something like £250 000 to train one doctor -- if you don't want to be a doctor and work for the NHS, train elsewhere, please. The NHS has enough budgetary problems without people taking the (almost) free training and then jetting off to some tropical paradise without putting anything back into the system.

    Or become a lawyer.
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    Lawlawlawlawlawlawlawlaw
    ALL THE WAY
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    (Original post by Banana00)
    Lawlawlawlawlawlawlawlaw
    ALL THE WAY
    Are you a student/practitioner of law by any chance? :lol:
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    Are you a student/practitioner of law by any chance? :lol:
    I'm only doing my GCSEs at the moment (Year 11), however I managed to shadow a top lawyer yesterday and it was fascinating. Plus, I'm not really into science
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    You yourself want to do law, face it. Just read your own comments all over again. You want to do law but you still want to hear opinions. You don't even genuinely like medicine and want to escape by all means. What about this:

    Listen to advice? Ok, take medicine. Because you can help human life's (presumably) and you and your family and benefit from you knowledge. And it's a good thing in every nice way. You get not good pay but you are always saving life's anyways. Law isn't always saving life's, sometimes yes...

    Anyway, then half way through, you might want to drop out from medicine and find out law could do more help for you in politics in terms of knowledge, cases, people or companies you could have dealt with. (More helpful than connection with patients) And you find it too difficult to stick to medicine.

    Then you realise you should have chosen law.

    That's one possible true story.

    And despite that, you want law, its obvious from your posts.
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    Whatever you choose you probably wont be doing the same job in 10 yrs anyway.

    Welcome to the real world, most employers grind you down today. If you think the NHS is bad try working for a US tech company. At least the NHS reward you with a great pension based on your salary, allow you to work part-time (no GP works 5 days a week) and allow you to have a private practise. Try getting that deal with a normal employer, you have to be kidding!!

    The grass always looks greener on the other side. Its time the NHS follows the example of companies like British Airways whose pilots have to pay for their training, around 75K if they leave before 6 or 7 years.

    As for law, due to all the court closures don't expect to find a job in criminal law and the hours will be long with all tha treading and prep.

    Go do work experience to see what the job is really like and then you will come to the conclusion that no job is perfect. Even well paid IT people have to work weekends, nights and never get overtime.
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    (Original post by Butternuts96)
    First year medic here and I can confidently tell you that if you're the slightest bit unsure about medicine or law, you would not cope well on the course and you will definetely hate it or drop out as the workload is immense and it would be so dull for someone who doesn't LOVE biological sciences. If you like humanities more, then go for law cause you'll hate it here.
    That's utter nonsense, ignore this advice OP.
    I've not met any medics to date that are 100% sure the course is for them. A lot of these medics have been very successful in their respective careers. Yes, anecdotal evidence but the point still stands- you don't have to be completely sold on the idea of being a doctor to go into medicine. In my opinion, having no doubts about medicine shows a lack of understanding of how demanding the career actually is. No sane person would look at the ****ty pay and long working hours and NOT have any doubts. Having doubts is natural, so please stop using this stupid argument to dissuade people from applying to medicine.
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    I enjoy science and politics and debating I enjoy medicine, however, I think subjects such as history and religious studies come more naturally to me than some science.I find it much easier to debate than understand some theories or balance some chemical equations.I would love to help people and it would be more interesting probably than sitting in an office, I have heard from lawyers that their job is boring and is over exaggerated in movies and the reality is much different.I really enjoy religious studies I am very curious, but I also enjoy looking up diseases and looking at surgery and things as such.I cannot decide I have heard from some lawyers earn a good salary, but some say otherwise.Also, doctors are apparently overworked.Can someone weigh up the pro and cons, please.

    I am confused before I knew deeply that medicine is the dream, but now I don't know anymore.The reality of me working all week morning night in a hospital for less money than deserved.I would like to work privately as I have heard the salary is better and the hours but, I would probably need some experience to work privately. I am so uncertain of my future couple days ago I was so sure.But now all I hear is junior doctors being abused and overworked by the NHS.Which is dangerous as it can be fatal.
    You can always do a 1 year Law conversion post-grad course if you change your mind. You can't do a 1 year Med conversion course.
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    Medicine.

    I am doing law and absolutely hate it. Does anyone what jobs are out there if you don't want to be a lawyer but a law degree can be of use.
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    (Original post by thechemistress)
    That's utter nonsense, ignore this advice OP.
    I've not met any medics to date that are 100% sure the course is for them. A lot of these medics have been very successful in their respective careers. Yes, anecdotal evidence but the point still stands- you don't have to be completely sold on the idea of being a doctor to go into medicine. In my opinion, having no doubts about medicine shows a lack of understanding of how demanding the career actually is. No sane person would look at the ****ty pay and long working hours and NOT have any doubts. Having doubts is natural, so please stop using this stupid argument to dissuade people from applying to medicine.
    I think you are right.We all have doubts, but I need to make the right decision because if I go to uni and don't do what I would like, I will live a life of regret.I love helping people but when you work hard you would like your efforts to be paid what they deserve.I want to live in Singapore or Australia because I want to explore and have an adventure.I just want to escape and work good hours, I think it is natural for anyone to want to work a job with better hours.It would be interesting to be a lawyer, but I am sure reality is far different than portrayed by the media, and the chance of me working my dream job of a politician is highly unlikely.I need to be realistic and smart so I cannot risk it and try to get into politics as it is a hard job to get ahead in.
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    (Original post by thechemistress)
    That's utter nonsense, ignore this advice OP.
    I've not met any medics to date that are 100% sure the course is for them. A lot of these medics have been very successful in their respective careers. Yes, anecdotal evidence but the point still stands- you don't have to be completely sold on the idea of being a doctor to go into medicine. In my opinion, having no doubts about medicine shows a lack of understanding of how demanding the career actually is. No sane person would look at the ****ty pay and long working hours and NOT have any doubts. Having doubts is natural, so please stop using this stupid argument to dissuade people from applying to medicine.
    Get out of here. To get into medicine is gruelling process that takes a lot of energy effort and passion. Fine, once you're in med school you might be daunted by all the negatives but the large majority WANT to do medicine with a passion and if she lacks this passion from the start, then she wouldn't even get an interview let alone an offer let alone get into med school because the admission tutors and if she gets lucky, the interviews will see her lack of passion and commitment to the programme.

    I'm not trying to stop people applying to med, much the opposite. But this is the harsh truth.
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    (Original post by Butternuts96)
    Get out of here. To get into medicine is gruelling process that takes a lot of energy effort and passion. Fine, once you're in med school you might be daunted by all the negatives but the large majority WANT to do medicine with a passion and if she lacks this passion from the start, then she wouldn't even get an interview let alone an offer let alone get into med school because the admission tutors and if she gets lucky, the interviews will see her lack of passion and commitment to the programme.

    I'm not trying to stop people applying to med, much the opposite. But this is the harsh truth.
    Yes, but you said that a person must be 100% sure that they want to do medicine, did you not? I was clearly contesting that statement, so your reply is rather irrelevant. Please re-read my reply to you, I didn't ever say that a person doesn't need to be passionate about medicine, I merely stated that having a few doubts was to be expected and that nobody can be 100% sure medicine is for them (until they start working, of course).

    Also, to address the bit in bold- I just want to say that it's easy to fake passion for a subject. Interviews aren't all-knowing mind readers, I know several people who've got into medicine and aren't enthusiastic about it at all, mainly just in it for the money (lord knows why, since medicine isn't exactly well paid :lol: ). You have a rather idealistic view of the medicine admissions process
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    (Original post by thechemistress)
    Yes, but you said that a person must be 100% sure that they want to do medicine, did you not? I was clearly contesting that statement, so your reply is rather irrelevant. Please re-read my reply to you, I didn't ever say that a person doesn't need to be passionate about medicine, I merely stated that having a few doubts was to be expected and that nobody can be 100% sure medicine is for them (until they start working, of course).

    Also, to address the bit in bold- I just want to say that it's easy to fake passion for a subject. Interviews aren't all-knowing mind readers, I know several people who've got into medicine and aren't enthusiastic about it at all, mainly just in it for the money (lord knows why, since medicine isn't exactly well paid :lol: ). You have a rather idealistic view of the medicine admissions process
    Yeah I posted the initial comment a while back but my point still stands. Even to fake the passion which a lot of people I know did, it takes a certain level of commitment to research these things and find out about them to speak about in your personal statement and interviews. She clearly would be happier doing law so let her.
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    I think you are right.We all have doubts, but I need to make the right decision because if I go to uni and don't do what I would like, I will live a life of regret.I love helping people but when you work hard you would like your efforts to be paid what they deserve.I want to live in Singapore or Australia because I want to explore and have an adventure.I just want to escape and work good hours , I think it is natural for anyone to want to work a job with better hours.It would be interesting to be a lawyer, but I am sure reality is far different than portrayed by the media, and the chance of me working my dream job of a politician is highly unlikely.I need to be realistic and smart so I cannot risk it and try to get into politics as it is a hard job to get ahead in.
    If the bold is true, then medicine is not for you. There's very little exploration or adventure in medicine -- you don't exactly sound academic if I'm honest. You very much seem to be living in an extended childhood. Spare the NHS the £250 000+ that it will waste on training you -- it can be put to better use than training somebody who clearly doesn't understand the job, only wants it for the money and the respect, and is actively planning to jump ship after graduating.

    You're clearly only interested in getting money and respect and I doubt your idea of 'helping people' is anything close to what will be expected of you when practising medicine (*insert generic 'get work experience' comment*). Bottomline: If you want to make a ton of money, don't train as a doctor. The days of financial security in medicine are over so please refrain from wasting the limited money the NHS has so you can get a piece of paper to show off to potential suitors.
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    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    Don't do law. It is massively over subscribed and there is already a surplus of law grads. Do something with a good likely hood of work at the end of it.
    +1
    you are more likely to get a job as a doctor than a lawyer.
    trust me I'm a lawyer, I'm self employed.
 
 
 
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