Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by XcitingStuart)
    But you're still academically probably smarter than a heck load of the population.

    Don't give up yet; you may not have just found your niche yet.



    For that. (+1 for that.)
    But if that doesn't equate to monney where does that get me?
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kasa)
    I would apply for it, but I have Aspegers.
    Lots of people with ASD get and hold down all sorts of jobs. You are not trying hard enough.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kasa)
    But if that doesn't equate to monney where does that get me?
    Then you'll have to I suppose move onto something else until you find an opportunity, or find something you're good at.

    It's sad that life has to be like this, but I wish you good luck anyway.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Maker)
    Lots of people with ASD get and hold down all sorts of jobs. You are not trying hard enough.
    Apparently a low percentaage of people with Austim are in employment.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by XcitingStuart)
    Then you'll have to I suppose move onto something else until you find an opportunity, or find something you're good at.

    It's sad that life has to be like this, but I wish you good luck anyway.

    I am starting to HATE mine...
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kasa)
    Apparently a low percentaage of people with Austim are in employment.
    If you have Autism, I think you should be eligible for disability benefits. I know someone here in the US that lives in an apartment in North Dakota on disability because he has Asperger's. He has a Master's degree in Mathematics, but he can't find a job or drive a car due to his impaired social and motor skills.

    Social skills and connections are important these days, so if you have communication difficulties and don't socialise well... that's a serious impairment and you may need to live on benefits.

    I know you may not be proud of that, but that's the truth. You have a disability, and you may not be able to get a job, at least not without government help. It's not your fault.

    I don't know if they offer those benefits to people with ASD in the UK, but I would think that a country as socially liberal as the UK would be willing to cover at least the same categories of people that we do, if not more.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kasa)
    Apparently a low percentaage of people with Austim are in employment.
    Thats not true.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jeremy1988)
    If you have Autism, I think you should be eligible for disability benefits. I know someone here in the US that lives in an apartment in North Dakota on disability because he has Asperger's. He has a Master's degree in Mathematics, but he can't find a job or drive a car due to his impaired social and motor skills.

    Social skills and connections are important these days, so if you have communication difficulties and don't socialise well... that's a serious impairment and you may need to live on benefits.

    I know you may not be proud of that, but that's the truth. You have a disability, and you may not be able to get a job, at least not without government help. It's not your fault.

    I don't know if they offer those benefits to people with ASD in the UK, but I would think that a country as socially liberal as the UK would be willing to cover at least the same categories of people that we do, if not more.
    I am not sure that is a good idea in the UK
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    no one has zero talents!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TeryMery)
    no one has zero talents!
    Indeed, I have one for being useless.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    wow that's depressing. you're doing a masters' degree and you think you're dumb. what hope is there for the rest of us?
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Well I doubt you are dumb, seeing as got on a Masters course and seem perfectly coherent in your messages. I think you are being too harsh on yourself. Despite the economic pick up the labour market is still saturated, especially at the graduate level, and getting a job is difficult. Don't feel too bad, you are not the only one in this situation. Get a recruitment agency to go over your CV, and get them to help you into employment. If that doesn't work I think you need to explore jobs and opportunities outside of where you are currently aiming, and start to remove the mental barrier of being too qualified to get these jobs.

    If you get a CSCS card you can find Labouring work in construction. It is hard, you work in all weathers, but the money is often decent and if you put in the graft you'll find plenty of opportunities. Plus you can move on to other trades from there. A blue collar job working as a self-employed tradesmen is often better paying than your run of the mill office job.

    The security industry is always looking for people, and although an SIA certificate will set you back a bit it will open quite a few avenues. The hours are often unsociable, but the pay is better than minimum wage. If you can handle dealing with drunks or spending your evenings alone in boredom guarding some sort of building it is a good job to do.

    Bar work is another one to look at. Again unsociable hours and having to deal with drunks, but they tend to have high staff turnover so roles are usually open quite often. The pay is usually poor, but it is still better than nothing.

    And as others have said retail. They often employ graduates and students, and the pay within the industry is currently on the rise. Can be mind-numbing work, but it pays the bills and is a good thing to keep you going. Also opportunities to progress within the corporate structure are usually good, at least in theory, provided you are competent.

    Despite having a 2:1 I didn't fair well in the graduate field so decided to venture out. I have worked in most of the above fields, and they really aren't that bad, as well as being quite accessible to most people. At the end of the day a job is a job, and if it means having to stack shelves or shovel gravel it is better than being stuck on the dole. Nothing to stop you working on starting a career while in employment.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Swanbow)
    Well I doubt you are dumb, seeing as got on a Masters course and seem perfectly coherent in your messages. I think you are being too harsh on yourself. Despite the economic pick up the labour market is still saturated, especially at the graduate level, and getting a job is difficult. Don't feel too bad, you are not the only one in this situation. Get a recruitment agency to go over your CV, and get them to help you into employment. If that doesn't work I think you need to explore jobs and opportunities outside of where you are currently aiming, and start to remove the mental barrier of being too qualified to get these jobs.

    If you get a CSCS card you can find Labouring work in construction. It is hard, you work in all weathers, but the money is often decent and if you put in the graft you'll find plenty of opportunities. Plus you can move on to other trades from there. A blue collar job working as a self-employed tradesmen is often better paying than your run of the mill office job.

    The security industry is always looking for people, and although an SIA certificate will set you back a bit it will open quite a few avenues. The hours are often unsociable, but the pay is better than minimum wage. If you can handle dealing with drunks or spending your evenings alone in boredom guarding some sort of building it is a good job to do.

    Bar work is another one to look at. Again unsociable hours and having to deal with drunks, but they tend to have high staff turnover so roles are usually open quite often. The pay is usually poor, but it is still better than nothing.

    And as others have said retail. They often employ graduates and students, and the pay within the industry is currently on the rise. Can be mind-numbing work, but it pays the bills and is a good thing to keep you going. Also opportunities to progress within the corporate structure are usually good, at least in theory, provided you are competent.

    Despite having a 2:1 I didn't fair well in the graduate field so decided to venture out. I have worked in most of the above fields, and they really aren't that bad, as well as being quite accessible to most people. At the end of the day a job is a job, and if it means having to stack shelves or shovel gravel it is better than being stuck on the dole. Nothing to stop you working on starting a career while in employment.

    My fear is that I am of low intelligence anyway and just can't seem to admit this to myself. Maybe my IQ is so low maybe I should work as a cleaner.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kasa)
    My fear is that I am of low intelligence anyway and just can't seem to admit this to myself. Maybe my IQ is so low maybe I should work as a cleaner.
    Your posts in this thread reveal that you are DEFINITELY not of low intelligence; they are well-written, coherent. What is standing out is your low level of belief in yourself, and the lack of value you place in your achievements and yourself... I mean you have a degree! I know a lot of people who didn't make it through uni, and that was not because they were not intelligent. It was a whole variety of reasons. You have done something that for many people is really difficult, and not possible.p

    Someone above said that maybe you were not suited to the academic environment/white collor trajectory of success. It's really unfortunate that many people consider this the 'main' wait to be financially successful, when it really is not for everyone. But have you tried looking at alternative options? What do you actually enjoy doing, or what would you like to try? How many things have you tried your hand at, to conclude that you are talentless. What subjects did you do throughout education? was there something that sparked your interest but you didn't follow up with? Thinking about these things my be a clues to what you are supposed to do.

    Definitely get a bar job/retail job whilst waiting for this. I did so, and not only did it boost myself esteem, it and gave me money to pursue what I wanted.

    There is no rationale in deciding to aim low because you feel that's what you deserve. That's more about how you are feeling about yourself right now. It's emotional. Don't decide to aim low. Just aim elsewhere, but equally high.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Always.Inbetween)
    Your posts in this thread reveal that you are DEFINITELY not of low intelligence; they are well-written, coherent. What is standing out is your low level of belief in yourself, and the lack of value you place in your achievements and yourself... I mean you have a degree! I know a lot of people who didn't make it through uni, and that was not because they were not intelligent. It was a whole variety of reasons. You have done something that for many people is really difficult, and not possible.p

    Someone above said that maybe you were not suited to the academic environment/white collor trajectory of success. It's really unfortunate that many people consider this the 'main' wait to be financially successful, when it really is not for everyone. But have you tried looking at alternative options? What do you actually enjoy doing, or what would you like to try? How many things have you tried your hand at, to conclude that you are talentless. What subjects did you do throughout education? was there something that sparked your interest but you didn't follow up with? Thinking about these things my be a clues to what you are supposed to do.

    Definitely get a bar job/retail job whilst waiting for this. I did so, and not only did it boost myself esteem, it and gave me money to pursue what I wanted.

    There is no rationale in deciding to aim low because you feel that's what you deserve. That's more about how you are feeling about yourself right now. It's emotional. Don't decide to aim low. Just aim elsewhere, but equally high.

    Thank you. This makes me feel a lot better
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Was this thread made for me? There's practically nothing going on in my brain.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by senz72)
    Was this thread made for me? There's practically nothing going on in my brain.
    More than mine.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kasa)
    More than mine.
    Don't be silly. I'm stupid as.

    Doesn't bode well for my MH. Lol.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kasa)
    I finished my biomedical degree with a really low 2:2 and managed to get onto a master’s course with a merit, but have struggled for years beforehand in terms of employment. I am finally starting to realise that I am naturally not bright. My GCSE grades are poor, my a-level grades are average, my undergraduate degree is awful, and I don’t know my master’s marks yet. I have failed at every interview with over 50 interview rejections.. What should I do?

    Like someone said on here, they said I should apply for a cleaner job
    Getting a 2.2 does not have to mean that you're stupid. Sometimes poor performance in one area can bring your grade down. I got quite bad in my dissertation and it was double weighted . it dragged my average down to a 2.2. However, I had some 65+ marks which gave me hope that I can't be too dumb. You must have some positive experiences during your degree , reflect on those! I'm not familiar with masters grading , but a merit must hold value. Don't put yourself down so much. By all means apply and do any job you can find right now be it cleaner/ bar / but don't give up your goals.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dbdb)
    Getting a 2.2 does not have to mean that you're stupid. Sometimes poor performance in one area can bring your grade down. I got quite bad in my dissertation and it was double weighted . it dragged my average down to a 2.2. However, I had some 65+ marks which gave me hope that I can't be too dumb. You must have some positive experiences during your degree , reflect on those! I'm not familiar with masters grading , but a merit must hold value. Don't put yourself down so much. By all means apply and do any job you can find right now be it cleaner/ bar / but don't give up your goals.
    If you saw the the marks from my transcript your jaw would drop open.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: October 30, 2015

3,836

students online now

800,000+

Exam discussions

Find your exam discussion here

Poll
Should predicted grades be removed from the uni application process
Useful resources

Articles and guides:

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A-Z of careers Advice on choosing a careerCV writing helpCovering letter helpInterview tips

Featured recruiter profiles:

CGI logo

CGI is open for applications

"Offering a range of apprentice and sponsored degree positions."

Deutsche Bank logo

Deutsche Bank is recruiting

"Thrive in an international banking environment"

ICAEW logo

Merck

"Merck is a global leader in specialized pharma & chemicals – join us!"

Army logo

The Army is recruiting now

"With hundreds of roles available, there’s more than one way to be the best."

Bianca Miller, runner-up on The Apprentice

Handle your digital footprint

What would an employer find out about you on Google? Find out how to take control.

Quick links:

Unanswered career sector and employment threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.