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Britain could face a crisis in the education system. watch

  • View Poll Results: Do you believe there could be a crisis in the education system?
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    (Original post by MrMackyTv)
    Lol I was just kidding. I have those sort of teachers, it isn't really physical abuse...

    Nothing will stop bad behaviour, that's the problem. It really depends on where you teach. Some places, teachers are paid a lot of money and students respect them, so in those places it would be one of the best jobs you could get, you could say it's like being a doctor here.

    The problem is, the salary just isn't good. £29,000 a year is not a job I would like to stay in, that's why even long-term teachers will eventually leave for a higher paying job.
    There are plenty of things that will stop bad behaviour but most of those things wouldn't be allowed in state schools.
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    (Original post by Bill_Gates)
    erm no! it's the raw basis of economics private sector creates all value.
    Lol. But most people who work in public sector are £5,000 better off than people who work in the private sector. How does the private sector create value anyways? Tax?
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    (Original post by MrMackyTv)
    Lol. But most people who work in public sector are £5,000 better off than people who work in the private sector. How does the private sector create value anyways? Tax?
    omg *face palm*

    just forget it. RIP UK PLC.
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    (Original post by MrMackyTv)
    I have been keeping an eye on the news recently. There is an unheard part of the media, that no one talks about. It is hidden among other issues in the country.

    Public sector workers are only getting 1% pay rise over the course of 5 years. Is this enough for the increasing demand of teachers in the country?

    Schools are becoming "overcrowded" because of the places available, especially in London.

    Teacher shortages, costing "millions in supply staff".

    40% of teachers leave the profession after the first year and more than 50% of teachers "plan to quit in the next two years".

    Teachers are being "reduced to tears" because of the heavy workload that they are expected to do.

    Experts say that academies don't work, one school rated outstanding 2 years ago has been put into special measures by inspectors, and it's an academy. And Mr Cameron claims that academies turn around schools, why not this one?

    Isn't this a recipe for disaster?
    I love working with kids and I love teaching. It is amazing. I absolutely adore the voluntary work I do in primary school. I would happily do it full time. I want to be a teacher.

    Teaching is amazing, an absolute privilege. So long as it is not made into a tick box exercise where all that matters is the percentage of pupils you get at a particular grade. Then it becomes a nightmare. I don't want to do that. It is absolutely pointless and benefits nobody.

    The pay is not my main concern or reason for wanting to teach. I want to teach because I want to transform the life of a child, impart knowledge and help the kids to learn skills. I want to help a child develop, grow and learn about the world. I want to inspire a child to think for themselves, explore their world and use their imagination.

    When this is reduced to an exercise in ticking boxes, I will no longer want to teach because I am not fulfilling my dreams. It is impossible to do the things I said if teaching becomes lecturing on how to pass an exam. Teachers are overstretched and stressed, not because of the kids, but because of the system where the development of the child doesn't matter unless they fit into a nice little box.

    We need more teachers. Or rather we need more good teachers. We need teachers who can inspire a class and help children to learn.

    This is done by ending the tick box culture the government favours. We need to support teachers by providing time to plan lessons and mark books. We need to pay teachers properly. We need to limit class sizes, and ensure that there are enough teaching assistants in schools. We also need to properly support SEN kids. It is an absolute joke at the moment. This makes life easier for teachers as well as better for the kids. I speak as a dyspraxic person here. I played up far less when I was supported compared to when I wasn't.

    To answer your question, yes what we have now is a recipe for disaster.

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    (Original post by MrMackyTv)
    They've also made changes to GCSE's to. I am going to be taking the first new GCSE exam in Maths and English in 2017. I'm okay with Maths but English (AQA) is a bit boring with shakespeare. No one has actually been interested in the topic, we have to learn everything by heart... I don't know how I'm going to do it but I'm sure I'll get through it.

    It is playing politics. Promising people lots of things but not fufilling them when your in government. I don't know why people always fall for it, politicians will never be honest imo.
    Do you have to learn everything by heart? Or just selectively learn quotes which support your claim/point?
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    (Original post by Katty3)
    I love working with kids and I love teaching. It is amazing. I absolutely adore the voluntary work I do in primary school. I would happily do it full time.

    Teaching is amazing. So long as it is not made into a tick box exercise where all that matters is the percentage of pupils you get at a particular grade. Then it becomes a nightmare.

    The pay is not my main concern or reason for wanting to teach. I want to teach because I want to transform the life of a child, impart knowledge and help the kids to learn skills. I want to help a child develop, grow and learn about the world.

    When this is reduced to an exercise in ticking boxes, I will no longer want to teach because I am

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    May you never change.
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    (Original post by Kagutsuchi)
    Do you have to learn everything by heart? Or just selectively learn quotes which support your claim/point?
    Yep. The exam is not an open-book/notes examination so everything will have to be learnt by heart over the course of 2 years, hopefully with a lot of practice it should be no problem to know every single bit of a novel. We can just selectively learn points to support a claim, we don't know what sort of questions we are going to get so that would be risky. Therefore, because of that we have to learn all of it so when we go to the exam we are prepared for any question.
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    (Original post by Kagutsuchi)
    May you never change.
    ?

    Please read edit. On mobile version and pressed submit before I was ready.

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    (Original post by Katty3)
    I love working with kids and I love teaching. It is amazing. I absolutely adore the voluntary work I do in primary school. I would happily do it full time.

    Teaching is amazing. So long as it is not made into a tick box exercise where all that matters is the percentage of pupils you get at a particular grade. Then it becomes a nightmare.

    The pay is not my main concern or reason for wanting to teach. I want to teach because I want to transform the life of a child, impart knowledge and help the kids to learn skills. I want to help a child develop, grow and learn about the world.

    When this is reduced to an exercise in ticking boxes, I will no longer want to teach because I am

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    It is a bit easier to teach in primary schools from what I've seen. The worse behaviour starts to arise during secondary school, when they get rebellious and start to cause disruption. However, primary schools aren't immune from this. You must have heard that primary school places in the country are also being affected.

    Just like you love teaching I love learning, and making sure that I can do things that I never thought I could do. It must be so heart-warming to see a kid achieve that. But when other kids try to spoil that by disrupting the lesson (average of 1 hour a day according to a BBC report) and giving the teacher a hard time, then I hate learning because learning for me and learning to them mean two different things. For them that's causing carnage and for me it's gaining knowledge.

    EDIT: Just read your edit and I completely agree with you. Our education system is in need of a reform.
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    (Original post by Katty3)
    ?

    Please read edit. On mobile version and pressed submit before I was ready.

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    To be fair and I have no opinion for or against this but primary educators aren't likely to see a salary increase anytime in the future as there are so many people wanting to do it, it's actually one of the most overcrowded teaching sectors. I still believe this crisis applies to specific departments in secondary education. In which they're not gonna get professionals, so they're gonna have to find them outside the country. Which is a whole 'nother can of worms that'll be a coffin in the nail of this country.
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    (Original post by ron_trns)
    To be fair and I have no opinion for or against this but primary educators aren't likely to see a salary increase anytime in the future as there are so many people wanting to do it, it's actually one of the most overcrowded teaching sectors. I still believe this crisis applies to specific departments in secondary education. In which they're not gonna get professionals, so they're gonna have to find them outside the country. Which is a whole 'nother can of worms that'll be a coffin in the nail of this country.
    I agree with this. Most of the smoke is only coming from one place, and that's in the secondary education department, especially in supply staff too. My school is actually short-staffed in one of their departments and I am having a unspecialised (in the subject I study) teacher teaching my class once a week (out of 3). It's just paper work and not actual teaching... if this is the quality of teaching I am going to get till my course then it will feel like I have wasted a lot of time just not learning any material...
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    (Original post by ikhan94)
    I wouldve thought if there were shortages in teachers they would try to tempt them in with a higher salary
    Nope, there are a bunch of schemes to get people to go into teaching (cash and benefits wise) but alot leave the moment they can after any benefits end.
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    (Original post by MrMackyTv)
    It is a bit easier to teach in primary schools from what I've seen. The worse behaviour starts to arise during secondary school, when they get rebellious and start to cause disruption. However, primary schools aren't immune from this. You must have heard that primary school places in the country are also being affected.

    Just like you love teaching I love learning, and making sure that I can do things that I never thought I could do. It must be so heart-warming to see a kid achieve that. But when other kids try to spoil that by disrupting the lesson (average of 1 hour a day according to a BBC report) and giving the teacher a hard time, then I hate learning because learning for me and learning to them mean two different things. For them that's causing carnage and for me it's gaining knowledge.

    EDIT: Just read your edit and I completely agree with you. Our education system is in need of a reform.
    It is absolutely wonderful seeing a child suddenly grasp a concept. You don't really get it until you experience that though. The kids are fab. I volunteer both with reception age children and with Brownies. They do sometimes misbehave. I am quite good at keeping control of a class or Brownie pack, so they don't tend to mess about too much with me, but it is hard work.

    I agree that it is easier to control the younger kids, but you still get rebels at all ages. We have a rising birth rate and a crisis in teacher retention. I'm not particularly interested in the ins and outs of why we have a rising birth rate but we do. All these kids will need education. When teachers are leaving teaching like rats from a sinking ship then you have a problem. Any idiot can see that. The exceptions being Nicki Morgan and Michael Gove.

    We can't change the birth rate. But we can encourage more people into teaching. We can also listen to the experts when they say that what you're doing is a bad idea. Generally speaking teachers tend to know more about teaching than government officials and civil servants do. Yet they are being ignored in favour of ideological reforms based on sepia tinged memories of the bad old days.

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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    They don't listen to the teachers because the NUT continues to roadblock any changes, goes on strike and may be politically motivated. They also advocate a libertarian style of education and focus on personal development while the Asians continue to roar forward with an academic approach.

    Its worth saying that one of the teaching unions (albeit a small one) does largely support the Tory reforms.



    I imagine with the English Bac the idea will be to move to a US style GPA. The market will within a year or two judge the required score.
    The NUT and NASUWT block the changes because they are a bad idea. See my previous post on why I want to teach. The Asian model of education is stressful for the kids, horrible for the teachers and generally is pretty backwards. The kids only learn by rote. They learn facts, but not how to think. Their imagination is quashed and they lose their childhood.

    The best way of learning for young children is through play. I get the kids to imagine what it would be like to be a Victorian, rather than getting them to rote learn a list of dates and events. It is boring for the kids to learn by rote and it doesn't really teach them anything important or useful. We have a wonderful resource called the Internet. If you want to find out the date of the battle of Waterloo, you can look it up. There is no point in teaching kids lists of facts so they can pass a certain exam.

    It's tick box teaching at it's very worst. Teaching and education should be about helping each and every child achieve their potential, not about getting a set number of kids to meet an arbitrary standard by a certain age. We know that children develop at different speeds. I may end up teaching a little girl who grows up to be a world leading physicist at age 30 or I may teach a little boy grows up to be a brilliant nursery nurse by age 22. Both of these are fine. I would be proud of both of them.

    The emphasis on personal development is the right one. The academic approach to education is outdated. It doesn't suit many children. Different kids have different talents. Not every child is a gifted historian. Just like not every child would be a brilliant car mechanic.

    Which union supports the changes? And what is their membership?

    The idea of a GPA sounds terrible. When would it be calculated? How would it be calculated? If someone messed up one subject, would it negatively affect the rest of their life? What about choice in education?
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    The older I've become and the more volunteering I've done with kids, the more the idea of teaching has interested me. Not to mention the great teachers I've had throughout the years who would do anything for their students.

    However, it's not the pay or workload that puts me off. It's behaviour, particularly with secondary school kids. I'm young enough tp have grown up in the new generation of secondary school kids and frankly, they can get away with anything. The fact that a teacher can do nothing wrong, some stroppy teenage chav can develop a victim complex and then your name ends up splashed across the front pages for something you didn't do is enough to put anyone off. Political correctness smh.

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    (Original post by Moonstruck16)

    However, it's not the pay or workload that puts me off. It's behaviour, particularly with secondary school kids. I'm young enough tp have grown up in the new generation of secondary school kids and frankly, they can get away with anything. The fact that a teacher can do nothing wrong, some stroppy teenage chav can develop a victim complex and then your name ends up splashed across the front pages for something you didn't do is enough to put anyone off. Political correctness smh.
    Disruptive behaviour in schools probably peaked sometime in the mid 1980s and has been in decline ever since.
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    (Original post by The_Internet)
    Waiting for someone to blame this on the EU/immigrants/Muslims/Jews somehow.
    Flipping EU giving us all their Jewish scientists discovering all these flipping things that we have to teach our kids about :mad:

    Spoiler:
    Show
    Sarcasm. Calm down.


    But seriously, we need Grammar schools, not more faith schools and academies. We need better pay for teachers. Etc.
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    (Original post by Johann von Gauss)
    Flipping EU giving us all their Jewish scientists discovering all these flipping things that we have to teach our kids about :mad:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Sarcasm. Calm down.

    But seriously, we need Grammar schools, not more faith schools and academies. We need better pay for teachers. Etc.
    Lol I gathered that was sarcasm

    There's a girl downstairs, who's a teacher and I don't envy her. She does 40 hours/week (contracted) and then there's the time for marking and the like. It doesn't really give you much time to do any thing else really does it?
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Disruptive behaviour in schools probably peaked sometime in the mid 1980s and has been in decline ever since.
    Teacher stabbing seems to be on the rise though.

    Leeds http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ukne...d-to-flee.html
    Bradford http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ukne...-sentence.html
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    (Original post by MrMackyTv)
    I think that would make it worse lol.
    I agree, in that books can be damaged by throwing. Chalk and board rubbers are more effective anyway.

    The serious point is that classroom discipline has become too lax in state schools (though not in private schools, generally).
 
 
 

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