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    (Original post by frogs r everywhere)
    Cardiology. The organ we feel with.
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    Ophthalmology- I just really want to see what others see...
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    (Original post by thechemistress)
    Oh wow, really? When I did work experience, I shadowed a non-surgical orthopaedician (is that the word?) XD
    Orthopaedics is definitely a branch of surgery. An orthopaedic surgeon who would refuse to hammer and drill is a contradiction in terms

    As Beska has suggested, perhaps you were thinking of orthogeriatrics?

    (Original post by Kadak)
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    Wow,I'm shocked.You'd think, especially with Cameron experiences with his disabled son and how grateful he was to NHS staff for the care provided,he wouldn't let something like this happen.Guess not
    Ha, that was him totally playing the public. Most high ranking politicians are bona fide psychopaths who'd sell their granny or invoke the memory of their dead whoever in order to get a few votes. Actions speak louder than words: you can't trust a Tory on the NHS, even the ones with crocodile tears in their eyes.
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    (Original post by Beska)
    Haha :mmm:

    To our defence though, why can't emotions and memories be stored outside the brain? Listen to your heart! :suith:
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    I'm applying to medical school for 2016 entry and I would really like to go into a physics-based & technical speciality such as radiology, nuclear medicine, and clinical oncology. I really like physics

    Would anyone recommend that I intercalate in something like Medical Physics, Medical Imaging, or Biomedical engineering in order to help me make a more informed decision?
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    I'm very undecided. Perhaps one of the more practical medical specialties such as cardiology or gastro.

    (Original post by Kadak)
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    I wonder why politicians not ask doctors and nurses about their opinions on how to save the NHS,but it seems politicians think they know everything.
    Using that logic, we probably wouldn't have an NHS in the first place. I'm pretty sure doctors were the strongest opponents of introducing the NHS.
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)

    Using that logic, we probably wouldn't have an NHS in the first place. I'm pretty sure doctors were the strongest opponents of introducing the NHS.
    They weren't actually - this is a historical inaccuracy which is used as a stick to beat the BMA with.

    http://bma.org.uk/-/media/files/pdfs...phhd%20tfg.pdf
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    (Original post by Ichiko N.A.B.)
    I'm applying to medical school for 2016 entry and I would really like to go into a physics-based & technical speciality such as radiology, nuclear medicine, and clinical oncology. I really like physics

    Would anyone recommend that I intercalate in something like Medical Physics, Medical Imaging, or Biomedical engineering in order to help me make a more informed decision?
    I'd spend my efforts in getting into medicine first and foremost. School-level Physics is rather different to medical physics.
    But then again, school is different to life in general.

    Yes, an intercalated degree in a field you are interested in will be a bonus, but not essential. But hey, in 2030, who know what competition may bring.
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    Cardiology, 'cause it's pretty much the only thing we've learnt about that I've been genuinely, over-the-top, enthusiastic about.
    Everything else is interesting to a degree, but not to the extent it can hold my attention for that long.

    It's not really changed since before I started med school - did all my work experience in cardiology and always said it'd be something I'd like to do.

    Also like old people so geriatrics is another option.
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    (Original post by Ichiko N.A.B.)
    I'm applying to medical school for 2016 entry and I would really like to go into a physics-based & technical speciality such as radiology, nuclear medicine, and clinical oncology. I really like physics

    Would anyone recommend that I intercalate in something like Medical Physics, Medical Imaging, or Biomedical engineering in order to help me make a more informed decision?
    It may also be worth keeping Orthopaedics in mind if you like physics and want to be in a technical based specialty. It may not come straight to mind but it does involve a lot of mechanics, particularly if you're interested in becoming involved in the academic side. There are also opportunities to get involved with biomaterials and implant design/testing.

    If you're interested in physics and want to intercalate in an allied subject once you've gained a little experience then go for it.
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    (Original post by Ichiko N.A.B.)
    I'm applying to medical school for 2016 entry and I would really like to go into a physics-based & technical speciality such as radiology, nuclear medicine, and clinical oncology. I really like physics

    Would anyone recommend that I intercalate in something like Medical Physics, Medical Imaging, or Biomedical engineering in order to help me make a more informed decision?
    I wouldn't worry about intercalating just yet, the time will come when you can pick something that you're interested in.

    And in terms of "making an informed decision," I don't think it will be that useful anyway. Sure you'll learn a lot of underlying science, but you'll get a better impression of what the specialty is actually like through clinical placements.
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    (Original post by Kadak)
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    Wow,I'm shocked.You'd think, especially with Cameron experiences with his disabled son and how grateful he was to NHS staff for the care provided,he wouldn't let something like this happen.Guess not.
    It's annoying politicians are using you guys as a political ball game.I wonder why politicians not ask doctors and nurses about their opinions on how to save the NHS,but it seems politicians think they know everything.
    ... all of what Helenia said PLUS remember the background: junior doctors pay was slashed in 2007, the pensions have been raided twice, pay has been frozen since about 2008, cost of exams, registration and insurance continues to rise, they're bringing in restrictions on private work, doctors are still rotated around different hospitals over a big area up to every 6 months until we're consultants i.e. normally 35 upwards, and other perks are being eroded e.g. there are some doctors out there who have to pay £12 per day to park at the hospital they work at...

    And then Jeremy Hunt comes out saying things like doctors need to "get real" [and work at weekends] when most are already on a rolling rota of weekends and nights (A&E + a lot of ITU docs work every other weekend...) and doctors deliberately stay late to earn "danger money" (no doctor has ever heard of this - we stay late because there isn't enough staff and our patients need us and we get paid precisely £0 extra for doing so), says doctors should be replaced by computers when NHS IT is already a complete disaster and the current system I have to use for my e-learning only runs on Internet Explorer 6 and a specific version of Shockwave from 2005. Then hospitals get rated as "inadequate" even though the inspectors themselves say that the staff are working phenomenally hard, have attempts at hiring staff so that wards meet the absolute minimum staffing levels blocked by ridiculous immigration laws... and people are really pissed off. I think even if Jeremy backed all the way down and went back to what things were before there'd still be lots of doctors who would vote to strike just to show that we've had enough!
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    I the 5/6 years of medical school is the time to explore all options and develop your interests. What you might be interested in now could be completely different from what you want to do by the time you graduate. Having a rough idea of what you intend to specialise in from the beginning can be a good head start in terms of finding opportunities and keeping motivated, but its not necessary or common.
    I'm lucky in that i went into med school already knowing that surgery is the speciality for me, it's hands on practical, difficult, suits my personality and lifestyle, immediate in terms of treating patients and just suits my overall clinical interests. Clinical medicine just doesn't do it for me.

    I'm leaning towards neurosurgery (vascular particularly), mainly because neuroanatomy is what I enjoy learning about the most, and if you're going to dedicate 10+ of your life training in a particular surgical field, you best be interested in staring at that body part for hours on end.

    However, more recently i'v been getting more and more interested in cardiothoracics, as I'v found a lot of the operations performed to be very complex and engaging in a way that I havent found with neuro yet. The only fear I have with cardiothoracic surgery is the apparent diminishing nature of the field itself. The ratio of jobs:applicants has been steadily growing worse, a lot of the work cardio surgeons used to perform have become redundant as catheter-based treatments for heart diseases become more advanced and cardiologists now perform a lot of the work cardiosurgeons used to do. Hence, It's seeming more and more like if you're interested in specializing in cardio, cardiology is a safer job with a more reliable future than cardiothoracic surgery. So I might just have to stick with neurosurgery
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    Lots of love for cardiology. Cardiology is what I wanted to specialise in, until I had an ssc in it. A lot less fun and a lot more arguing about the tiny difference in outcomes with different anticoagulants. Sure the Cath lab was fun but at the end of the day it was just a glorified arterial line to me. Bored me to death!
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    I really want to become a heart surgeon so I can tell people I'm a heart surgeon.
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    Paedriatic plastic surgery or microsurgery. I'm still at the I'd be so cool phase lol and I just started medschool(but seriously, I really think I'd love that not just that it's cool). Basically, I want to be a plastic surgeon but not for the boobs.

    If I had to be realistic and less dreamy, orthopaedics or ophtalmology. Tbh all I know for sure is what I don't want but then again, I just started.
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    love the dynamics of surgery, cardiothoracic and neurosurgery particularly interest me
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    (Original post by SiminaM)
    Paedriatic plastic surgery or microsurgery. I'm still at the I'd be so cool phase lol and I just started medschool. Basically, I want to be a plastic surgeon but not for the boobs..
    All day hypospadias repair lists are in your future.
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    (Original post by DrID)
    Lots of love for cardiology. Cardiology is what I wanted to specialise in, until I had an ssc in it. A lot less fun and a lot more arguing about the tiny difference in outcomes with different anticoagulants. Sure the Cath lab was fun but at the end of the day it was just a glorified arterial line to me. Bored me to death!
    Cardiologists sure do love to argue. Throw in a bit of research evidence and it's like a pack of wolves. :p:
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    (Original post by Hippysnake)
    I really want to become a heart surgeon so I can tell people I'm a heart surgeon.
    Sounds like a medical applicant who saw a picture of the heart in his AQA biology textbook and knew cardiac surgery was for him :sexface:
 
 
 
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