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Don't want to be a doctor but too far into degree to quit watch

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    (Original post by *pitseleh*)
    Sure, appreciate the privileged position you're in, OP. But beyond that, please don't take any notice of people who play the 'other people would love to have that chance' card. You don't owe other applicants.

    I understand your pain - I've wanted to quit a number of times, even since pre-clinical years, but every time family and friends have convinced me that it'll get better. And it has, a bit. What's been keeping me going the last few years is the hope that I will still enjoy the job at the end of it all, and the fact that while there are (and always have been) other careers that interest me, I'm not invested in any of them, and nor could I just walk out of Medicine into one of them. The best advice I've been given on the subject was this: you should only drop out if there's something you're sure you want to do more than Medicine - drop out because you positively want to do something else, not because you feel unhappy in Medicine and just want to run away from it. Otherwise you're burning one bridge before you've even figured out if there's another one you like the look of, never mind actually crossing it. Also don't forget that there are plenty of qualified doctors who didn't enjoy their time at medical school, but who are now happy in their job. I'm hoping I'll be one of those; hopefully you could be, too.

    I'm not saying you shouldn't drop out. Just try to remember that not enjoying it now doesn't automatically mean you won't enjoy it in the future. Good luck with whatever decision you make.
    This. I'm technically a third year medical student (currently intercalating in Neuroscience after my third year) and I will be leaving medicine after my intercalation with a BSc in Neuroscience. I found that I hated the clinical aspect of medicine and what I really want to do is basic science research. Unfortunately it took three years of medical school to figure this out. However, I am able to leave medical school with a degree and will hopefully be going on to a PhD programme from here.

    My advice, echoing the above, is that if you want to drop out, make sure 1) you can get something for your time at medical school, and 2) you have something to move on to. With most students making the huge decision to study medicine at the young age of 18, a lot of medical schools are prepared for the fact that at least one, or a handful of students realise medicine isn't for them. As such, a lot of medical schools have resources to help these students and particularly useful careers advisers.

    I hope you manage to find what you really want to do, and don't feel like you owe it to others to complete medicine, do simply what makes you happy!
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    (Original post by YesDoc)
    This. I'm technically a third year medical student (currently intercalating in Neuroscience after my third year) and I will be leaving medicine after my intercalation with a BSc in Neuroscience. I found that I hated the clinical aspect of medicine and what I really want to do is basic science research. Unfortunately it took three years of medical school to figure this out. However, I am able to leave medical school with a degree and will hopefully be going on to a PhD programme from here.
    I'm sure you have been through all your options and taken advice but are you certain about not completing the medical degree? Obviously this is the right thing to do if you really can't tolerate clinical medicine but scientists with an MBChB do sometimes reap little advantages for having that additional background.

    It might also be a selling point with future employers and funding bodies. You will always be a little more "colourful" to clinician scientists that sit on these panels, even if you never practice a day in your life.
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    (Original post by confused1235)
    relative to most of my other classmates i feel less competent than them, so im not just comparing myself to junior doctors, Even during our hospital rotations in uni not much is required for us but i still struggle

    For most people this isn;t an issue , no one else on my course complains about finding the practical work that difficult especially at this stage .
    Plenty of people realise medicine is not for them because they don't like it or find it interesting. But on some of your posts you instead seem to imply you find it too challenging as you feel incompetent next to your peers.
    At your stage I would say finish the degree, perhaps try F1 and then go into something else. Many jobs out there for grads, regardless of the course!
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    Management consultancy is open to graduates from any degree discipline. A numerical or analytical degree may give you more options in terms of which sectors you can apply to.

    Management consultants are in demand a range of sectors such as banking, healthcare and retail (finishing your current medical degree would point to give you the edge in the healthcare arena).

    A good academic record may be more of a consideration than the subject of study to most emloyers.

    In any event, whatever degree you complete is a means to an end. My thinking is this; completing your current medical degree will provide you with enough academic rigour to be considered for a narrower range of Managemet Consultant positions. Alteranatively, aborting your current studies and taking on a BSc in the UK would naturally widen the range of sectors you could compete for. Try to decide the sector you woud 'best fit', once you can establish that, you will find the answer you are looking for.

    Either way, I wish you well, listen to your gut and you should be fine whatever you decide because either choice you make will find you a route in to where your heart wants/needs to be and end the current dilemma you are facing. (I think you already know what you have to do, the clue is in the title of this thread) Just stick at it once you decide for sure and focus on what you have achieved so far, you are doing great.

    All the best.
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    (Original post by YesDoc)
    This. I'm technically a third year medical student (currently intercalating in Neuroscience after my third year) and I will be leaving medicine after my intercalation with a BSc in Neuroscience. I found that I hated the clinical aspect of medicine and what I really want to do is basic science research. Unfortunately it took three years of medical school to figure this out. However, I am able to leave medical school with a degree and will hopefully be going on to a PhD programme from here.

    My advice, echoing the above, is that if you want to drop out, make sure 1) you can get something for your time at medical school, and 2) you have something to move on to. With most students making the huge decision to study medicine at the young age of 18, a lot of medical schools are prepared for the fact that at least one, or a handful of students realise medicine isn't for them. As such, a lot of medical schools have resources to help these students and particularly useful careers advisers.

    I hope you manage to find what you really want to do, and don't feel like you owe it to others to complete medicine, do simply what makes you happy!
    My friend, brother from another mother. We did the exact same thing! Intercalated in Neuroscience and got the **** out! Such a great call too. OP needs to sit down and work out what he truly wants to do with his life then start making steps. Medicine isnt some ticket to some incredible life. Do medicine if you're certain you want to be a doctor, otherwise don't waste the time, you'll only make yourself miserable.
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    I'm sure you have been through all your options and taken advice but are you certain about not completing the medical degree? Obviously this is the right thing to do if you really can't tolerate clinical medicine but scientists with an MBChB do sometimes reap little advantages for having that additional background.

    It might also be a selling point with future employers and funding bodies. You will always be a little more "colourful" to clinician scientists that sit on these panels, even if you never practice a day in your life.
    With time and experience, you'll realise that no one gives a **** about individuals that pursue degrees or qualifications or whatever it might be purely for the purpose of appearing more "colourful" to others. True respect is earned when one excels in a field they're passionate about and makes a solid contribution to said field. Spending 2 more years of his life locked up in clinical medicine is not going to be beneficial to the poster when as a hard working individual he could use that time (which is a LOT of time) to really focus on his research that he WANTS to do. Don't fall into the highly popular trap of believing that completing a medical degree is a worthwhile pursuit purely for the status.
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    (Original post by Pantha66)
    With time and experience, you'll realise that no one gives a **** about individuals that pursue degrees or qualifications or whatever it might be purely for the purpose of appearing more "colourful" to others. True respect is earned when one excels in a field they're passionate about and makes a solid contribution to said field. Spending 2 more years of his life locked up in clinical medicine is not going to be beneficial to the poster when as a hard working individual he could use that time (which is a LOT of time) to really focus on his research that he WANTS to do. Don't fall into the highly popular trap of believing that completing a medical degree is a worthwhile pursuit purely for the status.
    LOL I think you will find the person you quoted has quite significantly more experience than you. :p:

    *(I'm not the person you quoted, by the way.)
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    LOL I think you will find the person you quoted has quite significantly more experience than you. :p:

    *(I'm not the person you quoted, by the way.)
    Evidently they need a little more time and experience to reach such pinnacles of wisdom lol
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    (Original post by Etomidate)
    Presumably the reason why OP posted this thread in the current medical students subforum was to avoid comments like this from snotty applicants.
    Are you GodSpeedG... Or something like that before you got blocked!?! I hope so. I've missed your sneering posts haha.


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    (Original post by baztech)
    Are you GodSpeedG... Or something like that before you got blocked!?! I hope so. I've missed your sneering posts haha.


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    In some unis if you leave medicine halfway they give you a Biomedicine degree, find out if your uni does anything similar then you won't have wasted any time, and are able to go on to whatever you would like with a degree in a respectable subject.


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    (Original post by Etomidate)
    😉


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    Hey guys , been a while since i posted here but i wanted to give an update

    I've finished the 4th year of my degree now . At this point i've decided just to endure through my last 2 clinical years , although i have to admit I am taking a very minimalistic approach with my exams and clinical classes now , not aiming for high grades anymore and not spending any extra time in the hospital beyond what i need to get the credit for my class. I admit its a waste of time but at the end of the day i will get my degree and move on . I;ve already told my parents about my decision and apologized for wasting their money.

    my main reason for just continuing is because i simply do not know what I would want to do if i left , i don't feel like i truly have a passion for anything yet , there are a lot of things i would like to try but there is no guarantee they would interest me in the long run (doesn;t stop me thinking about 'what if' scenario's all the time), so i might as well just continue and get something out of the time i've invested here. like someone previously said , there is no point in burning this bridge just to burn another one later on.

    my uni unfortunately does not offer a a intercalated bsc , so that was never an option . something to keep in mind for people wanting to apply abroad , there is really no safety net once you get too far into your degree.

    admittedly one big misconception i had about medical school was that it is some sort of magical machine that automatically gives you the skill set to become a doctor. now i have realised that truly is not the case, my personality never aligned with what is expected of a doctor and still doesn;t, rather than pursuing something that played to my strength , i did the exact opposite by going into medicine. Reaching the tail end of my degree i realise ive spent so much of my time pretending to be interested in medicine and what it means to be a doctor , but in reality i find it all boring and don;t think i ever truly was interested in it. Just something to keep in mind for people applying to uni - really think about the person you are and what YOU want to do. (as obvious as it sounds , its easy to forget sometimes).
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    I admire your honesty. You've been through the mill and although you may come out at the end of it with little of any practical value there will be people who see completing a medicine degree (quite rightly) as a huge achievement. It will undoubtably open doors.

    Whilst I agree with a previous poster about not doing med for the glory and bragging rights I do think with as much time as you have invested in it you should finish it, especially as you don't know what to do next anyway. Maybe try and do some activities/volunteering over the next two years, just random stuff, to see if you find something you're passionate about.

    Best of luck!
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    (Original post by confused1235)
    Hey guys , been a while since i posted here but i wanted to give an update

    my personality never aligned with what is expected of a doctor and still doesn;t, rather than pursuing something that played to my strength , i did the exact opposite by going into medicine. Reaching the tail end of my degree i realise ive spent so much of my time pretending to be interested in medicine and what it means to be a doctor , but in reality i find it all boring and don;t think i ever truly was interested in it. Just something to keep in mind for people applying to uni - really think about the person you are and what YOU want to do. (as obvious as it sounds , its easy to forget sometimes).
    I'm curious, what exactly is it about your personality that didn't align with medicine? It would be good to hear this from someone who is actually in medical school / is a doctor, compared to what I read on prospectus websites.
 
 
 
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