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    The entire point of DSA is to give you a level playing field, not to give you an advantage. A lot is already being done for disabled students.
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    Years ago, we had no such thing as the equalities or disability discrimination acts. Those of us with things like autism were put into institutions, etc.

    You've have no idea how lucky you really are. A lot is done for disabled students. You should be grateful for the help you get. You should also be grateful that you can actually attend uni - something some of us can't do. No matter how much help us thrown at us.
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    (Original post by student2312)
    modest too....
    okay?
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    Mr Cameron for ya.
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    Do you realise how much of a spoilt brat you sound? Have you ever considered that there are thousands of students who show SOME signs of a disability and cannot get diagnosed and they have to struggle because of the loophole in the system.

    I have a disability and I am thankful for all the support I get off the government. Without them, I would not be aiming to go to uni in September. I would happily pay £200 for a laptop.

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    (Original post by George12X)
    Do you realise how much of a spoilt brat you sound? Have you ever considered that there are thousands of students who show SOME signs of a disability and cannot get diagnosed and they have to struggle because of the loophole in the system.

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    This happened to me more than once. And when I did get the proper diagnosis, I got no help. Oh, and then there was the GP who decided I was lying about the pain I was in.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    This happened to me more than once. And when I did get the proper diagnosis, I got no help. Oh, and then there was the GP who decided I was lying about the pain I was in.
    Me too. When I first approached my GP asking for his support in applying for DSA (without which the uni's Student Support department wouldn't consider helping me), he just snorted and refused. Apparently, the ability to handwrite for only twenty minutes at a time was "just something you have to get used to" (bearing in mind that I'd held down a very whizzy job in IT for 15 years with the condition by that point, and was more than "used to" it).

    I saw a different GP a few months later, who immediately spotted the practical problem inherent with a twenty minute writing limit in a three hour exam. At that point, I got the all-important GP support, which meant the DSA statement so that the uni let me do exams on a word processor. But if I'd given up after the first refusal, I basically couldn't have gone to uni because I physically couldn't have completed the exams.

    Plenty of people who need help, are still being left without it. I'm not saying that disabled students should be grateful for being thrown crumbs. But when we're provided with facilities which level the playing field with conventionally functional students, we shouldn't be moaning because the facilities don't give us an advantage. That would be unfair on a whole new level.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    Me too. When I first approached my GP asking for his support in applying for DSA (without which the uni's Student Support department wouldn't consider helping me), he just snorted and refused. Apparently, the ability to handwrite for only twenty minutes at a time was "just something you have to get used to" (bearing in mind that I'd held down a very whizzy job in IT for 15 years with the condition by that point, and was more than "used to" it).

    I saw a different GP a few months later, who immediately spotted the practical problem inherent with a twenty minute writing limit in a three hour exam. At that point, I got the all-important GP support, which meant the DSA statement so that the uni let me do exams on a word processor. But if I'd given up after the first refusal, I basically couldn't have gone to uni because I physically couldn't have completed the exams.

    Plenty of people who need help, are still being left without it. I'm not saying that disabled students should be grateful for being thrown crumbs. But when we're provided with facilities which level the playing field with conventionally functional students, we shouldn't be moaning because the facilities don't give us an advantage. That would be unfair on a whole new level.
    One of the conditions I have, apparently causes no problems at all. Yet, a lot of us have problems such as visual impairments, epilepsy, behaviour difficulties, headaches, etc. But somehow, the two aren't linked. I recently accidentally discovered that there was actually a change in the scans I had.

    One of the conditions I have, there's the argument of "you're an adult; so you should have adapted to it, therefore, we won't help you". Yet, I've not learnt how to do a lot of basic things that a lot of people take for granted. Social services won't touch me with a barge pole and claim I'm being awkward. They don't understand the need for more than 30 minutes notice warning of an appointment (which they ahd two weeks to plan and inform me of) and that you can't take me anywhere noisy. They wondered why my response was to just walk out. I had a choice there - I either walk out or I stay and risk a a meltdown in which I go non verbal and end up in quite a lot of physical pain. For obvious reasons, I walked out.
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    (Original post by Mihael_Keehl)
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    Now you're just being greedy... Disabled peeps get it much easier than normal peeps - that's all.
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    (Original post by Angelo12231)
    Now you're just being greedy... Disabled peeps get it much easier than normal peeps - that's all.
    Actually, we don't get it easier. Maybe you wouldn't be saying that if you couldn't read print (I can't even read a Kindle now) and were slowly losing your hearing too.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    Actually, we don't get it easier. Maybe you wouldn't be saying that if you couldn't read print (I can't even read a Kindle now) and were slowly losing your hearing too.
    The point is there's only so much other people can do to aid you, the rest is down to you. It almost felt like the OP was using her disability as an excuse to get a kings chair and a massage every time she goes to school...

    On the other hand, I do feel sorry for disabled people, not that being disabled is a bad thing. much love <3
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    Yes I'm sure that walking into a classroom with a laptop because your disability makes you unable to write and being stared at by all of your class peers means I have it easier.

    You need a reality check mate.

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    (Original post by George12X)
    Yes I'm sure that walking into a classroom with a laptop because your disability makes you unable to write and being stared at by all of your class peers means I have it easier.

    You need a reality check mate.

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    I personally find things like this rather embarrassing. I know that no-one else cares; but I know that it draws attention to me. Everyone else tends to have pen and paper.
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    If the muscles in my arms would let me write then I would. Unfortunately they don't. People tend to get used to it after I explain why I need it.

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    (Original post by George12X)
    Yes I'm sure that walking into a classroom with a laptop because your disability makes you unable to write and being stared at by all of your class peers means I have it easier.

    You need a reality check mate.

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    It must depend on the uni or course. I'd say that more than half the students in my undergrad lectures used laptops (although granted, some of them were on Facebook moaning about how bored they were for two hours...). It was nothing unusual at all. The ones who handwrite copious notes were more the oddities on my course!
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    That reassures me just a tiny bit haha

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    (Original post by Mihael_Keehl)
    No just annoyed.

    In US they get 50% extra tiem for ADHD.

    I have multiple disabilites and only get 25%.

    Such a disgrace.

    Also, I shouldn't have to pay £200 for laptop, should be provided free. And also it has low specs omg.
    I agreed with you until the bolded part.
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    (Original post by George12X)
    Do you realise how much of a spoilt brat you sound? Have you ever considered that there are thousands of students who show SOME signs of a disability and cannot get diagnosed and they have to struggle because of the loophole in the system.

    I have a disability and I am thankful for all the support I get off the government. Without them, I would not be aiming to go to uni in September. I would happily pay £200 for a laptop.

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    Well said!
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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    What specific disabilities/difficulties do you have that makes you think you need more than what you already have? Surely its an issue where requirement should be matched to need. Maybe there is too much of a one size fits all approach?
    I have dyspraxia. It affects me quite severely and I cannot take notes. I need a laptop to do this. It is more than just finding it hard to write. I have illegible handwriting, very slow handwriting and it takes all my attention to write anything.

    Recording lectures and writing them up later would take about five or six hours for every hour of lecture. That is unsustainable.

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    (Original post by Katty3)
    I have dyspraxia. It affects me quite severely and I cannot take notes. I need a laptop to do this. It is more than just finding it hard to write. I have illegible handwriting, very slow handwriting and it takes all my attention to write anything.

    Recording lectures and writing them up later would take about five or six hours for every hour of lecture. That is unsustainable.

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    You should be able to get a note taker.
 
 
 
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