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  • View Poll Results: Do you recycle?
    I recycle everything
    220
    27.16%
    I recycle a bit
    400
    49.38%
    I try but forget
    114
    14.07%
    No it's too much effort
    76
    9.38%

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    (Original post by Captain Jack)
    Lots of discussion around at the moment about reducing waste and recycling thanks to Hugh Fernley-Whittingstalls new Waste Not campaign.

    So I was wondering how does TSR fare on the recycling front.
    I not only recycle all, but I try to reject any kind of plastic, especially those horrible little bags, well done to the government for putting a surcharge on them. It is about time all plastic carried a surcharge. One of my big beefs is McDonalds plastic toys in happy meals, why cant they produce a comic (as long as it is not about Ronald)?
    Big thumbs up to all the 'Recycle all' voters.
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    (Original post by Josb)
    :rolleyes:

    Communism was so much better.
    That sums up just how defunct capitalism can be.




    People need food. There is spare food. Nope you can not have that food. Clearly letting homeless people eat unwanted food would be communism.
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    If that were true, then no new businesses would ever succeed.
    :lolwut:

    No, that doesn't follow.

    The supermarket business has been established for a long time, and we were talking specifically about that. There may well be room for someone to market grade B produce outside that business model, but that's not what you were talking about.

    If you think it could work, explain how, with details. Otherwise, saying 'I reckon they could make this work [in this super obvious way which they'll obviously have considered]!' with nothing to back it up is ridiculous.
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    Yes....
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    :lolwut:

    No, that doesn't follow.

    The supermarket business has been established for a long time, and we were talking specifically about that. There may well be room for someone to market grade B produce outside that business model, but that's not what you were talking about.

    If you think it could work, explain how, with details. Otherwise, saying 'I reckon they could make this work [in this super obvious way which they'll obviously have considered]!' with nothing to back it up is ridiculous.
    Of course it follows. The idea that "if it were possible to make money out of something it would already have been done" is utterly idiotic.

    Think about it for a minute, then come back and correct yourself. You're a smart guy, supposedly. I shouldn't need to be explaining something so elementary to you.
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    Of course it follows. The idea that "if it were possible to make money out of something it would already have been done" is utterly idiotic.

    Think about it for a minute, then come back and correct yourself. You're a smart guy, supposedly. I shouldn't need to be explaining something so elementary to you.
    Fine, I looked at the part of my post you picked out, and I see I neglected to put a 'probably' in there (having clearly qualified myself in terms of likelihood in the previous paragraph).

    The point remains that your assumption that supermarkets are not selling this produce because they are 'lazy' or 'stupid', when you have no specifics, and when the most likely explanation is that it is just more cost-effective to dispose of it, is not justified.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    Fine, I looked at the part of my post you picked out, and I see I neglected to put a 'probably' in there (having clearly qualified myself in terms of likelihood in the previous paragraph).

    The point remains that your assumption that supermarkets are not selling this produce because they are 'lazy' or 'stupid', when you have no specifics, and when the most likely explanation is that it is just more cost-effective to dispose of it, is not justified.

    Have you ever heard of an oligopoly turning down the opportunity to capture more of the consumer surplus through second degree price discrimination by simple vertical product differentiation before? Its such a basic tactic.

    Supermarkets change tactics and strategies constantly. To suggest that they have found a winning formula that never changes is naive. This is just one of many potential tricks they are missing.
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    Have you ever heard of an oligopoly turning down the opportunity to capture more of the consumer surplus through second degree price discrimination by simple vertical product differentiation before? Its such a basic tactic.

    Supermarkets change tactics and strategies constantly. To suggest that they have found a winning formula that never changes is naive. This is just one of many potential tricks they are missing.
    It's because it's so basic that I would have expected it to have occurred to someone by now, meaning that it is more likely -- for instance --that there's just not enough profit, at a price at which it would actually sell, in the deformed-looking version of what is already relatively cheap stuff to justify keeping it on the shelf and potentially diverting some consumers from buying grade A produce.

    Don't get me wrong, I don't think supermarkets are always managed competently. A supermarket near me opened and shut within two years because they misjudged the local market terribly, presumably because they're morons. But it would be such an obvious move to just sell the stuff more cheaply rather than throw it away that I find it hard to believe that no-one in any of the big supermarkets has tried it out, if it might be profitable.

    Anyway, if what you want is less waste of grade B produce, you'd still probably be better to regulate it somehow than to wait for supermarkets to decide to figure out a profitable way to use it, or to decide to give it away for free.
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    Recycle? ***** shut the **** up hoe.
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    Have you ever heard of an oligopoly turning down the opportunity to capture more of the consumer surplus through second degree price discrimination by simple vertical product differentiation before? Its such a basic tactic.

    Supermarkets change tactics and strategies constantly. To suggest that they have found a winning formula that never changes is naive. This is just one of many potential tricks they are missing.
    ***** thats minor do some asymptotic test procedures
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    It's because it's so basic that I would have expected it to have occurred to someone by now, meaning that it is more likely -- for instance --that there's just not enough profit, at a price at which it would actually sell, in the deformed-looking version of what is already relatively cheap stuff to justify keeping it on the shelf and potentially diverting some consumers from buying grade A produce.

    Don't get me wrong, I don't think supermarkets are always managed competently. A supermarket near me opened and shut within two years because they misjudged the local market terribly, presumably because they're morons. But it would be such an obvious move to just sell the stuff more cheaply rather than throw it away that I find it hard to believe that no-one in any of the big supermarkets has tried it out, if it might be profitable.

    Anyway, if what you want is less waste of grade B produce, you'd still probably be better to regulate it somehow than to wait for supermarkets to decide to figure out a profitable way to use it, or to decide to give it away for free.
    You shouldn't have to regulate. Here is a product being produced, that has a positive value, being thrown away. The market should in theory find a way of extracting profit, but its not.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    It's because it's so basic that I would have expected it to have occurred to someone by now, meaning that it is more likely -- for instance --that there's just not enough profit, at a price at which it would actually sell, in the deformed-looking version of what is already relatively cheap stuff to justify keeping it on the shelf and potentially diverting some consumers from buying grade A produce.

    Don't get me wrong, I don't think supermarkets are always managed competently. A supermarket near me opened and shut within two years because they misjudged the local market terribly, presumably because they're morons. But it would be such an obvious move to just sell the stuff more cheaply rather than throw it away that I find it hard to believe that no-one in any of the big supermarkets has tried it out, if it might be profitable.

    Anyway, if what you want is less waste of grade B produce, you'd still probably be better to regulate it somehow than to wait for supermarkets to decide to figure out a profitable way to use it, or to decide to give it away for free.
    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    You shouldn't have to regulate. Here is a product being produced, that has a positive value, being thrown away. The market should in theory find a way of extracting profit, but its not.
    I usually find in life that the reason things don't happen is because people think it won't work and so don't even try.

    Public moods change. 10 years ago, it looked like local shops were done and dusted. But there is a definite trend, especially in more affluent areas for more choice and more local shops. And more and more people are wising up to the low quality and poor efficiency of some mass production - like this new programme. It has shifted opinion a little bit. Also, people get bored of different trends. Immaculate carrots are as much a fad as a fashion trend. People in the UK are definitely shifting towards more authentic foods, often for health reasons.

    So I think there is a market out there. I would definitely buy wonky veg over perfect veg because I am someone who cares about reducing wastage and use of finite materials.
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    (Original post by Captain Jack)
    I usually find in life that the reason things don't happen is because people think it won't work and so don't even try.

    Public moods change. 10 years ago, it looked like local shops were done and dusted. But there is a definite trend, especially in more affluent areas for more choice and more local shops. And more and more people are wising up to the low quality and poor efficiency of some mass production - like this new programme. It has shifted opinion a little bit. Also, people get bored of different trends. Immaculate carrots are as much a fad as a fashion trend. People in the UK are definitely shifting towards more authentic foods, often for health reasons.

    So I think there is a market out there. I would definitely buy wonky veg over perfect veg because I am someone who cares about reducing wastage and use of finite materials.

    Especially if the wonky veg was cheaper...

    Currently a lot of food gets thrown away, either by the producers themselves or at the supermarket, that most people would be perfectly happy to eat.

    If, instead, they flogged it for cheap to the local market, or made it into carrot mash or carrot sticks or grated carrot or carrot cake or something, they could definitely find a viable market for it, somewhere.

    A separate question is are they simply making too many carrots for us to be able to eat? In which case, either export them or grow something else instead ffs.
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    Yup, and then some! Also centred my dissertation (Behavioural Economics) on recycling behaviour :hippie:

    Link: Green Behaviour and Behavioural Change
 
 
 
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