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University isn't good for an Autistic person watch

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    I have another tip for you. You could train as a security guard. You can easily do this while at university and then work part-time.
    http://www.uksecurity-directory.co.u...ecurity-guard/

    When trained, you can get work on weekends, walking around deserted buildings at night, checking that the windows are closed. In the right position your interaction with people will be absolutely minimal (so long as you don't take jobs as a bodyguard or bouncer) and you can earn some money to make you a little bit more independent of your parents.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I can not cope with the disorder.

    I'm lucky that people don't think autistic or believe that i'm autistic (if i tell someone) but people know i'm a shy, introverted and possibly a loner
    You shouldn't be fussed on who knows, you shouldn't think things are bad because of your condition, when its clearly natural and hundreds if not millions have it.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Some people accept their autism, some people can't. The way this disorder has ruined me and my family is what made me leave my family to go to a far away uni.

    You speak very negatively about your disorder maybe that's why you are feeling this way. Have you tried making conversation with your flatmates or have you just presumed they're not talking to you because they haven't made conversation first? If you quit uni you will still be autistic but autistic without a degree so you need to stay. You can still have a social life, perhaps find a group of people in a similar situation to you and learn to accept and love who you are. People like you can help to bring that out and you will find socializing easier. I think you just need to shift your mind frame.
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    Why do you attempt to hide it? I mean, for starters, it's quite easy to tell when someone has a form of autism (unless it's really mild), and two, letting people know (if asked about it) will help people communicate with you properly, or at least not get so upset if you say something "offensive" or bluntly. But yeah, it is a shame you're not enjoying uni. I'm not even autistic (well, if I am, I'm not diagnosed) but I find the social aspect of uni (meeting people outside of class) borderline torturous to be honest. Oh yeah, and autism is likely genetic, so it isn't your fault that your brother has autism. Technically, it's your parents.
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    (Original post by Skratch My Itch)
    Why do you attempt to hide it? I mean, for starters, it's quite easy to tell when someone has a form of autism (unless it's really mild), and two, letting people know (if asked about it) will help people communicate with you properly, or at least not get so upset if you say something "offensive" or bluntly. But yeah, it is a shame you're not enjoying uni. I'm not even autistic (well, if I am, I'm not diagnosed) but I find the social aspect of uni (meeting people outside of class) borderline torturous to be honest. Oh yeah, and autism is likely genetic, so it isn't your fault that your brother has autism. Technically, it's your parents.
    Well, it's mild (if not probably unnoticeable). I get ****ing pissed off of people using it as an insult hence i will never announce the disorder.

    It's fine, i'm living as a recluse as i'm planning to move out of halls
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    (Original post by llys)
    I have another tip for you. You could train as a security guard. You can easily do this while at university and then work part-time.
    http://www.uksecurity-directory.co.u...ecurity-guard/

    When trained, you can get work on weekends, walking around deserted buildings at night, checking that the windows are closed. In the right position your interaction with people will be absolutely minimal (so long as you don't take jobs as a bodyguard or bouncer) and you can earn some money to make you a little bit more independent of your parents.
    Bad idea. They ought to be getting help and pushing themselves gradually into more social situations, not recoiling and isolating themselves.
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    Your parents do not seem particularly supportive of you, especially blaming you for your brother's autism. I am sorry they say these things. No wonder you seem to blame autism for all that is wrong in your life. I think you have accept that your brain is just different. Autism is only a disorder in so much that we do not think like most other people we meet, and that can lead to some problematic social situations.

    I'm autistic, and I agree that the social aspects of university can be very troublesome. I struggled in my first degree greatly, my university did not know I was autistic (I didn't know myself have only been recently diagnosed, after my boyfriend suggested to me that I may be autistic). I really struggled making friends and following lectures. It was a really lonely time and I had a nervous breakdown. Thankfully, I then had a councilor and doctor who helped me. I believe that if I'd known I am autistic I would have had a better time at uni.

    I am now studying for a second degree with the OU and I find this degree less stressful, as there is minimal social interaction and there is not the horrible noise and shuffling of lectures.

    The loneliness never goes away, but you must stick with your degree if you enjoy it. It will make getting jobs easier. There are also forums you can join to speak with others on the spectrum...it makes things bearable when non-autistic people do things you don't understand.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Well, it's mild (if not probably unnoticeable). I get ****ing pissed off of people using it as an insult hence i will never announce the disorder.

    It's fine, i'm living as a recluse as i'm planning to move out of halls
    Most people, if they're going to joke about your autism, at the very least, won't do it to your face. Most won't even joke about it anyway. But yeah. I get being a recluse. It does suck, but spending your whole time feeling sorry for yourself is not positive.
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    (Original post by somethingbeautiful)
    Bad idea. They ought to be getting help and pushing themselves gradually into more social situations, not recoiling and isolating themselves.
    That's wonderful advice. :hugs:

    Or he could just try to be happy the way he is.
 
 
 
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