Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kira Yagami)
    Am i the only one who doesn't like the proof questions? I mean some are okay but some can be weird right, any tips for them?
    Try to identify what kind of proof you will need (exhaustion/contradiction/algebraic) and then identify what you need to do for the specific question:

    For consecutive integers, they are written as n(n+1), for three consecutive integers (n-1)n(n+1) know all of your even times odd etc multiplications.

    for contradiction, set up an argument such as there is no common factor etc etc and disprove that argument and hence prove the fact.

    exhaustion is pretty easy anyway, prove from 1 through to 10 to fully disprove/prove something. (or the set they give you, eg primes)
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by starwarsjedi123)
    june 2015:

    http://vle.woodhouse.ac.uk/topicdocs.../C32015May.pdf


    how would you go about 6 part ii?

    ArcSin(x)=ArcCos(x)
    Not sure if this is a great way to do it but if you let x = sin(a) = cos(a) then find a value for a where cos(a) = sin(a).
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by starwarsjedi123)
    june 2015:

    http://vle.woodhouse.ac.uk/topicdocs.../C32015May.pdf


    how would you go about 6 part ii?

    ArcSin(x)=ArcCos(x)
    From a method an old teacher of mine used:

    arcsin(x) = arccos(x) = t (can be anything, used t for lack of confusion)

    therefore

    sin(t) = x and cos(t) = x (sin(t) = cos(t) = x)

    (as has been done above)

    sin(t) = cos(t)
    tan(t) = 1 : Divide through by cos(t)
    .....
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by starwarsjedi123)
    june 2015:

    http://vle.woodhouse.ac.uk/topicdocs.../C32015May.pdf


    how would you go about 6 part ii?

    ArcSin(x)=ArcCos(x)
    its basically a test of inverses. Arcsin is the inverse of sin, and so (x,y) from sinx goes to (y,x) on arcsin(x). Same goes for ArcCos(x). Therefore you can say that sin(x)=cos(x), find the y value that they are both the same at and that is your x intercept on arcsinx and arccosx (x<-->y when inversed)
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by starwarsjedi123)
    june 2015:

    http://vle.woodhouse.ac.uk/topicdocs.../C32015May.pdf


    how would you go about 6 part ii?

    ArcSin(x)=ArcCos(x)
    Haha I didn't know my college website is eveyones standard for maths :laugh::laugh::laugh:
    • Thread Starter
    Online

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lycanfist)
    Haha I didn't know my college website is eveyones standard for maths :laugh::laugh::laugh:
    lol if your college didnt exist we would be screwed.
    • Thread Starter
    Online

    2
    ReputationRep:
    predictions for tomorrow? section b is pretty much the same each year except for 2014 in my opinion. i think there will be an exponential decay question, a modulus question,one differentiation question, one integration question and a proof question in section A. i dont think there will be rates of change
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kevvvvvv)
    lol if your college didnt exist we would be screwed.
    My college is good, but when it comes to solved solutions, this is the college for you

    http://www.sixthform.m34maths.com/A2-level.htm
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The-Spartan)
    Try to identify what kind of proof you will need (exhaustion/contradiction/algebraic) and then identify what you need to do for the specific question:

    For consecutive integers, they are written as n(n+1), for three consecutive integers (n-1)n(n+1) know all of your even times odd etc multiplications.

    for contradiction, set up an argument such as there is no common factor etc etc and disprove that argument and hence prove the fact.

    exhaustion is pretty easy anyway, prove from 1 through to 10 to fully disprove/prove something. (or the set they give you, eg primes)
    Thanks...
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Do we need to learn the definitions for all the types of mappings and functions etc??? Like what is many-to one , what is a function, what is a mapping etc... ( I know we need to know about odd and even functions) .
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kira Yagami)
    Do we need to learn the definitions for all the types of mappings and functions etc??? Like what is many-to one , what is a function, what is a mapping etc... ( I know we need to know about odd and even functions) .
    yep they are all needed, they could be asked for
    • Thread Starter
    Online

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lycanfist)
    My college is good, but when it comes to solved solutions, this is the college for you

    http://www.sixthform.m34maths.com/A2-level.htm
    yeah i use him when i dont understand the mark scheme
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ABeingOnEarth)
    Hi Jack, would you please be able to tell me how to do Q8(ii) in the Jan 2012 paper (http://www.mei.org.uk/files/papers/2012_Jan_c3.pdf)? Many thanks.
    Name:  20160620_231548.jpg
Views: 275
Size:  517.3 KB

    Hopefully this helps in a way, if you don't get any of the steps I can go through it with you.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    If you think "when does sin(x)=cos(x)" then we know that is when x is 45 degrees (or pi by 4). Similarly the inverses are the same then so the answer is arcsin(45) which is root 2 over 2. You can check by trying arccos 45 and see that it's the same
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    June 2014 8 part ii) show f'(x) = ....... I just cudnt simplify the quotient derivative expression someone help.....f(x) = (x)/(sqrt 2 + x^2)
    Attached Images
     
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    If you have a grey/silver casio calc then c3 is pretty straight forward
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jay Garrick)
    If you have a grey/silver casio calc then c3 is pretty straight forward
    https://education.ti.com/en-GB/uk/pr.../tabs/overview

    Guess I'm failing then
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tajwar786)
    June 2014 8 part ii) show f'(x) = ....... I just cudnt simplify the quotient derivative expression someone help.....f(x) = (x)/(sqrt 2 + x^2)
    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1466492646.294525.jpg
Views: 219
Size:  110.8 KB
    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1466492670.842710.jpg
Views: 211
Size:  96.2 KB

    Don't know how useful this is now... But if you just simplify the top into a fraction it becomes a lot easier


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    How did everyone find it?
    Reckon grade boundaries are standard (62=A etc)
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The-Spartan)
    How did everyone find it?
    Reckon grade boundaries are standard (62=A etc)
    Nice paper I thought
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Has a teacher ever helped you cheat?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.