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Scary thought about flying - someone could open door mid air?! Watch

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    (Original post by jneill)
    Those doors open outwards, not inwards. And skydiving is rarely from higher than 14,000ft - so pressure drop is not so extreme.
    Oh I understand the skydiving one, but what about people who are evacuating a plane or something?
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    As above, those doors open the other way, plus they will almost always take place from unpressurised aircraft, where there is no issue.
    Can you explain how the doors opening the other way will have an impact on the pressure?
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    (Original post by TianaEsther)
    Can you explain how the doors opening the other way will have an impact on the pressure?
    It's more how the pressure would have an impact on the doors opening...

    When an airliner is flying at altitude, the air inside needs to be thick enough for people to breath normally. However, the air outside is much thinner. This means the air on the inside of the plane is, essentially, pushing out.

    Think of it like a bottle of fizzy drink.

    The air inside is very hard to squeeze because it's thicker, but when you lift the lid off, it'll all come out. You wouldn't be able to push the lid in - it feels like there's no space for it, right?

    That's what a plane is. You're on the inside of a fizzy drinks bottle and the door hinge only allows you to try and pull it inwards, but the pressure won't let you.


    On the planes you sky dive from this isn't the case for 2 reasons; 1- the door hinge works the other way and 2- the plane isn't pressurised.
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    (Original post by TianaEsther)
    Oh I understand the skydiving one, but what about people who are evacuating a plane or something?
    You would only ever evacuate a passenger plane on the ground - pressure wouldn't be an issue then.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    It's more how the pressure would have an impact on the doors opening...

    When an airliner is flying at altitude, the air inside needs to be thick enough for people to breath normally. However, the air outside is much thinner. This means the air on the inside of the plane is, essentially, pushing out.

    Think of it like a bottle of fizzy drink.

    The air inside is very hard to squeeze because it's thicker, but when you lift the lid off, it'll all come out. You wouldn't be able to push the lid in - it feels like there's no space for it, right?

    That's what a plane is. You're on the inside of a fizzy drinks bottle and the door hinge only allows you to try and pull it inwards, but the pressure won't let you.


    On the planes you sky dive from this isn't the case for 2 reasons; 1- the door hinge works the other way and 2- the plane isn't pressurised.
    So if you can't pull it inwards why not push it outwards? (I feel like people are shaking their heads at my responses but I genuinely have no clue haha)
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    (Original post by TianaEsther)
    Oh I understand the skydiving one, but what about people who are evacuating a plane or something?
    If the plane is pressurised (e.g. a normal airliner) you can't evacuate from altitude.

    If it's a military aircraft, like a typhoon fighter, then they use small explosive charges to forcibly disconnect the canopy and then launch the ejector seat through the opening. But the pilot is protected becuase they have an oxygen mask and a flying suit, and is restrained in the ejector seat.
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    (Original post by TianaEsther)
    So if you can't pull it inwards why not push it outwards? (I feel like people are shaking their heads at my responses but I genuinely have no clue haha)
    It physically won't let you.

    Try opening one of your house doors the 'wrong' way. What happens?
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    It was possible to open the rear 'airstair' exit on a B727 in flight and the celebrated hijacking by D B Cooper ended when he exited the plane in flight...



    that's an obsolete plane these days though... I've not heard of a door being opened in flight on a modern passenger plane and suspect it's impossible for a passenger to do it.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    If the plane is pressurised (e.g. a normal airliner) you can't evacuate from altitude.

    If it's a military aircraft, like a typhoon fighter, then they use small explosive charges to forcibly disconnect the canopy and then launch the ejector seat through the opening. But the pilot is protected becuase they have an oxygen mask and a flying suit, and is restrained in the ejector seat.

    (Original post by Drewski)
    It physically won't let you.

    Try opening one of your house doors the 'wrong' way. What happens?
    So if a plane is crashing, how would the people get out?
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    (Original post by TianaEsther)
    So if a plane is crashing, how would the people get out?
    When it hits the ground.
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    (Original post by TianaEsther)
    So if a plane is crashing, how would the people get out?
    Why would you want to? There are no parachutes.

    A plane hasn't crashed until it hits the floor, the descent is something different.
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    (Original post by TianaEsther)
    So if a plane is crashing, how would the people get out?
    It hits the floor.

    I'm sorry but on passenger planes you can't let everyone parachute out so they aren't fitted with an emergency release

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    (Original post by Drewski)
    Why would you want to? There are no parachutes.

    A plane hasn't crashed until it hits the floor, the descent is something different.
    (Original post by Andy98)
    It hits the floor.

    I'm sorry but on passenger planes you can't let everyone parachute out so they aren't fitted with an emergency release

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    What about when you go on a plane and then at the beginning they tell you that the exits are *there, there & there* and they point to different places. I thought they were for leaving the plane, is there really a point evacuating once the plane has already crashed (in the middle of the ocean or perhaps even some random deserted place)
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    (Original post by TianaEsther)
    What about when you go on a plane and then at the beginning they tell you that the exits are *there, there & there* and they point to different places. I thought they were for leaving the plane, is there really a point evacuating once the plane has already crashed (in the middle of the ocean or perhaps even some random deserted place)
    They are for leaving the plane. When it's on the ground.

    And yes, there's always a point in leaving it. There have been many occasions where a plane has landed seemingly normally, only for there to be a problem with an engine (for example) and rather than carry on and risk a fire, the safest thing is to get everybody off. That's when you use the slides.

    In the case of landing on water, the slides are inflatable (and detachable) and therefore float. The plane is made of metal and won't. Where would you rather be?
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    Why would you want to? There are no parachutes.

    A plane hasn't crashed until it hits the floor, the descent is something different.
    Indeed.

    It's not the falling that kills you. It's hitting the ground that does that

    Or, as Douglas Adams almost said: Flying is throwing yourself at the ground, and missing.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Indeed.

    It's not the falling that kills you. It's hitting the ground that does that

    Or, as Douglas Adams almost said: Flying is throwing yourself at the ground, and missing.
    And remember, after a good landing you walk away.


    After a really good landing you use the plane again.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    After a really good landing you use the plane again.
    That's the bit that SpaceX haven't quite mastered... yet.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    They are for leaving the plane. When it's on the ground.

    And yes, there's always a point in leaving it. There have been many occasions where a plane has landed seemingly normally, only for there to be a problem with an engine (for example) and rather than carry on and risk a fire, the safest thing is to get everybody off. That's when you use the slides.

    In the case of landing on water, the slides are inflatable (and detachable) and therefore float. The plane is made of metal and won't. Where would you rather be?
    Hmm, say you are in the middle of the Mediterranean sea, how would you be able to find out where you are let alone finding out how to get on safe land (and not ending up in a place like Syria or something)
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    (Original post by TianaEsther)
    Hmm, say you are in the middle of the Mediterranean sea, how would you be able to find out where you are let alone finding out how to get on safe land (and not ending up in a place like Syria or something)
    You don't.

    Other people find out where you are. If a plane went down in the Med, people would know about it and it's location would be known very quickly.
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    (Original post by TianaEsther)
    Hmm, say you are in the middle of the Mediterranean sea, how would you be able to find out where you are let alone finding out how to get on safe land (and not ending up in a place like Syria or something)
    As a passenger after a plane crash at sea? Rescue services would be on their way to you, and you just drift around trying not to die.
 
 
 
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