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Article: Five revision myths demolished watch

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    I wrote myself a timetable for about a month from then till my exam and only followed it for the first week though I did study without it
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    Actually, fyi highlighters DO work some visual learners example me
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    (Original post by elen90)
    Timetable's often don't work for me because I set myself unrealistic targets (yeah, sure, I'm going to do three hours' revision the moment I get home from school). That can often leaving you feel demotivated when you don't stick within the timetable, not only because it's easy to underestimate how long it will take you to do something.

    I expected a spider diagram to take me one hour yesterday. It took three.

    I find that simple to-do lists work better. Ones that don't have time constraints - just stuff you know needs to get done, whether you complete it all within three hours or ten. Other people may feel differently, but it isn't even the end of the world if something doesn't get checked off. Just move it to the next day. This is why it's best to do the longwinded objectives first. Isn't a huge drag on your next day's revision just to complete that sheet of questions the teacher set.

    People often forget that it isn't the amount of time you spend revising that matters, but what you actually learn. And timetables are a great way for notorious procrastinators like me to waste time.
    100% agree with you
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    (Original post by Devilsadvocate2)
    'I know this one girl who did no revision at all… she got an A*'

    Not being arrogant, but I am this person. I did zero revision for all of my GCSES except two (music and geography) and ended up getting 7 A*'s and 6 A's.

    I did do revision for my A-levels and I am definitely doing revision for my degree- I'm also not against revising for exams
    BUT
    these people do exist and it's just plain wrong to say they don't.
    I don't think you understand the post properly.
    What it was saying, is that no body can do ZERO revision(this includes, doing past paper, just skimming a book, or trying to remember key facts) and still get an A*.
    • Very Important Poster
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    Very Important Poster
    (Original post by gcse week)
    I wrote myself a timetable for about a month from then till my exam and only followed it for the first week though I did study without it
    I always make them and they never work :hide: better to play things by ear, set rough goals (eg I will finish this unit by the end of this month) and spend reasonable time doing them, take regular breaks etc.
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    So the best way to learn is to do all your work and notes from the START of the year! No messing around and actually willing to spend your free time doing the best you can to actually smile at the end of the year on results day instead of crying! TRUST ME! I went from a CCD to ABB, with only two retakes, so yes you can do anything!
    I can't stress thing enough, but at the end of the day its a year or two out of your life and you will 100% regret it if you know you could have worked harder but you didn't really push yourself!
    Also, if your school don't give 'study leave' like mine , then do whatever you feel is right. I didn't bother going to lessons some days as my teacher in psychology was atrocious, got letters sent home, senior teacher shouting in my face (with pressure of exams mind) and guess what? I GOT AN A*.
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    Well, I got an A* without any revision. Just saying.
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    Thnx 😊
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    Impossible 😲😷🤓👍☘
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    I am that person who "doesn't exist"
    I don't revise, I don't plan essays, I don't do timetables. I have winged all of the exams that I got high marks in (English, Spanish, German, History) and I actually FAILED the ones that I revised for lol.
    But I guess there's always an exception to the rule ^^
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    Plan your revision in the summer holidays before your GCSE's.
    You can always modify it and it means that when revising you only have to get your subjects down.

    At any time you could start revising what you did at the start of the course- it works and saves you re-learning it later on
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    (Original post by elen90)
    Timetable's often don't work for me because I set myself unrealistic targets (yeah, sure, I'm going to do three hours' revision the moment I get home from school). That can often leaving you feel demotivated when you don't stick within the timetable, not only because it's easy to underestimate how long it will take you to do something.

    I expected a spider diagram to take me one hour yesterday. It took three.

    I find that simple to-do lists work better. Ones that don't have time constraints - just stuff you know needs to get done, whether you complete it all within three hours or ten. Other people may feel differently, but it isn't even the end of the world if something doesn't get checked off. Just move it to the next day. This is why it's best to do the longwinded objectives first. Isn't a huge drag on your next day's revision just to complete that sheet of questions the teacher set.

    People often forget that it isn't the amount of time you spend revising that matters, but what you actually learn. And timetables are a great way for notorious procrastinators like me to waste time.
    Sums me up XD
    At the moment, I'm finding that the best way for me to revise is by making a chart with all the past papers I could potentially/should do (I'm up to that stage), and ticking them off when I've completed and marked them. I'm only just scratching the surface now, but it is very satisfying :P And it's a realistic way of knowing where I'm up to, when it comes to the actual exams. Of course, I don't know whether I'm really going to be able to do 24 past papers per subject in the next month and a bit, but the way I think of it, I have 24 past papers (in each subject) with which to reach and comfortably sit on the grade I want. So while I may not actually be learning very much, at the moment, I'm more concerned with learning the exams XD Actual learning won't restart until the exams are over.
    • Welcome Squad
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    Welcome Squad
    The timetables thing is person dependent, and you shouldn't be pressuring people in this way. I have achieved very good grades without them, and am sitting on a Cambridge offer. Please remove it, because it could actually be very harmful, and is really a personal choice.
 
 
 
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