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13th Apr: What do you think is the best age to have kids? watch

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    Long time no here.

    The best age is the one where both parents have a responsible behaviour to children and the wish of caring for them. Sure, this is different to each other, but as a rule, I would say 27 up to 28 years in average. But this has not to be bound to truth. Me for instance is over 30 years old yet and to be very honest, I would not give myself credits of being responsible for children. I don't even know, if I would love my own kids...
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    I don't plan on having children until my very late twenties. I won't be graduating university until twenty four or twenty five and I'd want to establish a stable income before bringing human beings into the world that would be financially dependant on me. :lol:

    Along with that, I want to live my life a bit more. I love children and I'm excited for being a parent, but being aware of the responsibility that comes with that, I'm also enjoying being sans children at the moment. Children will come in time.

    In the bigger picture, I think it's hard to pinpoint a "right" age for being a parent. Ideally, it's at a point when you're financially capable and mature enough for that responsibility, but at what age that point is reached can vary.
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    FRIENDLY REMINDER!

    Your "career" is not important, and it is going to be worthless.

    What you take so seriously and protectingly label your "career", to others, looks like shіt nobody cares about that you waste your time on.

    You have NO excuse not to have at least 2 (2.1, if you want to be technical) children in the midst of your oh-so-precious "career".

    If it ruins your career, then you are bad at time management, which is extra-laughable, because your pointless career hasn't even succeeded because of your own incompetence.

    Now, unless you are Elon Musk, Obama, or Stephen Hawking, your time is not so important to the world that you cannot afford to spend a fraction of it on building a family.

    And guess what? Even these individuals had multiple children.
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    (Original post by LibertyMan)
    FRIENDLY REMINDER!

    Your "career" is not important, and it is going to be worthless.

    What you take so seriously and protectingly label your "career", to others, looks like shіt nobody cares about that you waste your time on.

    You have NO excuse not to have at least 2 (2.1, if you want to be technical) children in the midst of your oh-so-precious "career".

    If it ruins your career, then you are bad at time management, which is extra-laughable, because your pointless career hasn't even succeeded because of your own incompetence.

    Now, unless you are Elon Musk, Obama, or Stephen Hawking, your time is not so important to the world that you cannot afford to spend a fraction of it on building a family.

    And guess what? Even these individuals had multiple children.
    There is nothing to be added. Well roared, Tiger. Even very well. But what would you advice people who think that both, start a family and have a good career with a well-paid job, is not important?
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    There is nothing to be added. Well roared, Tiger. Even very well. But what would you advice people who think that both, start a family and have a good career with a well-paid job, is not important?
    Advice in what sense?

    Convincing them that anything is important is impossible because it requires digging at a very deep, philosophical level. (Whereas they are hedonists and/or apathetic) It's not hard to argue that everything is meaningless because it is just a collection of physical processes, and believing the opposite is an illogical attachment.

    People who want neither probably lack emotions that relate to human interaction, such as pride, a desire for respect from others for achieving something great, a sense of comformism in their community (and therefore having children), a sense of duty, and a simple want for human connection (and therefore a warm family).

    I may be basing my opinion on these people from different examples than to you, but I can only think of someone who wants neither to be
    1) Socially autistic, and therefore incapable of full interaction,
    2) Emotionally traumatised from childhood and therefore also unable to feel interaction or
    3) So spoilt that their desire for respect from others is constantly fulfilled and they do not care about getting more, and / or they are so used to a hedonist lifestyle they are put off by the prospect of hard work.

    I don't have it at hand but I can dig out some sources that claim that psychologically, the feeling of importance is one of the most fundamental to people, which would support the above 3 hypotheses.
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    Got a little girl of 16 months, had her when I was 25, which for me was a perfect age.

    The reasons we did:
    • I can keep up with her. I'm not very fit, but I can still kick a ball about with her. Some people having kids in their mid to late 40s.. they're going to be mid-late 50s when the kid is 10+! I don't know if I'd cope.
    • My wife's father died when she was still a teen, and it was really tough for her to deal with that alongside growing up. The older you get, the more likely it is. I'd like, for the sake of my daughter, to be around as long in her life as possible. I think if I died at her hitting 16, compared to her hitting 26, or 36, would be horrible for her.
    • They'll be out of the house by the time I'm mid 40s, hopefully, and I can get on with a good old mid-life crisis. My parents are doing loads of stuff now me and my brother are out of the way.
    • Mainly, it just felt right.


    But there's plenty of reasons not to when I did. We were very lucky to be in a stable position in our lives. We've been together 10 years, married, have a house, my job pays enough to support both of us and a child. It made sense.

    Some other 25 year old's aren't that lucky, and even if they want kids for the same reasons as me - I wouldn't have had them when I did if I wasn't in the my position.
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    Im almost 28 now and would love to have children. Im only emotionally ready now, definately wouldnt have been in my early 20s.

    But now that im going off to uni in september it looks like i'll be in my 30's before it happens.
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    I think it's very subjective, and depends on the welfare of the parent(s) and the child. It's only polite to ensure that you're predictably fit and well enough to look after the child until they need you no more, which limits your age upwards. However a lack of maturity in the parents at a younger age could decrease quality of life for the child also.
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    Very hard to say. I'm 21, and would probably say late 20s for the first one. A few years ago I would have said mid 20s, in a few years I may well say early 30s!

    I want to have a good career, be in a stable, long-term relationship, and be financially stable - own a house and have savings. But I should have all these things within the next few years if things carry on as they are. However more than this I want to experience things - I want to visit places all over the world and I want to be able to move around and not be so tied down with responsibility; I know it's possible to still visit places obviously but you can't do the same things with a kid and it's way more expensive. What I really don't want is to have a child and then feel trapped, and I feel like that might happen if I had a kid in the next few years.
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    Never.
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    (Original post by LibertyMan)
    FRIENDLY REMINDER!

    Your "career" is not important, and it is going to be worthless.

    What you take so seriously and protectingly label your "career", to others, looks like shіt nobody cares about that you waste your time on.

    You have NO excuse not to have at least 2 (2.1, if you want to be technical) children in the midst of your oh-so-precious "career".

    If it ruins your career, then you are bad at time management, which is extra-laughable, because your pointless career hasn't even succeeded because of your own incompetence.

    Now, unless you are Elon Musk, Obama, or Stephen Hawking, your time is not so important to the world that you cannot afford to spend a fraction of it on building a family.

    And guess what? Even these individuals had multiple children.
    So, don't pursue a career because it's worthless, but do have children and feed/house/clothe them via...?
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    What sort of imbecile would have children at all when there are so many others perfectly willing to repopulate the human race?

    They're noisy, expensive, stupid and disgusting. I'll keep the time, space and £££s for myself thanks.
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    (Original post by CCC75)
    So, don't pursue a career because it's worthless, but do have children and feed/house/clothe them via...?
    That's not what I said, I said you should have both, but children and family take priority over it. You do not need to be a CEO to feed a child.
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    (Original post by LiquidGold)
    Very hard to say. I'm 21, and would probably say late 20s for the first one. A few years ago I would have said mid 20s, in a few years I may well say early 30s!

    I want to have a good career, be in a stable, long-term relationship, and be financially stable - own a house and have savings. But I should have all these things within the next few years if things carry on as they are. However more than this I want to experience things - I want to visit places all over the world and I want to be able to move around and not be so tied down with responsibility; I know it's possible to still visit places obviously but you can't do the same things with a kid and it's way more expensive. What I really don't want is to have a child and then feel trapped, and I feel like that might happen if I had a kid in the next few years.
    Why have them at all

    Why not enjoy your life instead
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    (Original post by a noble chance)
    Why have them at all

    Why not enjoy your life instead
    Because i think having children will be very enjoyable? I'm sincerely looking forward to it, i just dont want it to happen too soon.
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    (Original post by LibertyMan)
    That's not what I said, I said you should have both, but children and family take priority over it. You do not need to be a CEO to feed a child.
    Makes much more sense. Thank you for clarifying.
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    (Original post by Hanvyj)
    Got a little girl of 16 months, had her when I was 25, which for me was a perfect age.

    The reasons we did:
    • I can keep up with her. I'm not very fit, but I can still kick a ball about with her. Some people having kids in their mid to late 40s.. they're going to be mid-late 50s when the kid is 10+! I don't know if I'd cope.
    • My wife's father died when she was still a teen, and it was really tough for her to deal with that alongside growing up. The older you get, the more likely it is. I'd like, for the sake of my daughter, to be around as long in her life as possible. I think if I died at her hitting 16, compared to her hitting 26, or 36, would be horrible for her.
    • They'll be out of the house by the time I'm mid 40s, hopefully, and I can get on with a good old mid-life crisis. My parents are doing loads of stuff now me and my brother are out of the way.
    • Mainly, it just felt right.

    But there's plenty of reasons not to when I did. We were very lucky to be in a stable position in our lives. We've been together 10 years, married, have a house, my job pays enough to support both of us and a child. It made sense.

    Some other 25 year old's aren't that lucky, and even if they want kids for the same reasons as me - I wouldn't have had them when I did if I wasn't in the my position.
    I hope to have children around that age and you've pretty much listed very similar reasons to why i want kids in my mid 20's. My dad passed away when I was 10 years old and if my parents haven't had me in my twenties then i wouldn't have had much time with him at all. Being a child that lost a parent, what I remember are the happy times we spent together and not how much money we had so although i want us to be stable and have jobs where there's not a massive risk of losing our income, i couldn't care less if i dont have a really ambitious career before having children. I've always worried that if I wait till later on to have children that they will lose me in their 30's/40's so their own children won't have much of a chance of grandparents for very long.

    Also like you said having the energy to keep up with them and run round, i think i ll be more resilient if i m still in my 20's whereas as considering my mum being 39 when my half sister was born, she found pregnancy much harder to cope with and finds it much harder to keep up with her when she had no trouble when i was little at all.
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    (Original post by a noble chance)
    What sort of imbecile would have children at all when there are so many others perfectly willing to repopulate the human race?

    They're noisy, expensive, stupid and disgusting. I'll keep the time, space and £££s for myself thanks.
    Your parents.
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    25-35
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    (Original post by Novascope)
    I used to say around 24/25. But I'm 21 this year and the thought of having a child in a couple years seems very odd haha. I still want a few years to enjoy myself, travel, have a solid career, build a relationship with someone etc. So realistically I think if you want the above then 27/28 would be the best time.
    Same here gal..27/28 is the perfect age!
 
 
 
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