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Pulmonary embolism? Could I die? Watch

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    (Original post by JoeTSR)
    Out of pure curiosity so I know for the future, what differential would it affect?

    I suspect OP has already gone to the walk-in centre, but would 111 not refer to the ambulance service being a chest pain call, despite the low likelihood of anything major?
    1. A heart attack in an 18 year old would be exceedingly rare.
    2. Even from the vague symptoms OP has described, it does not sound like a heart attack.
    3. Even if it was, it's unlikely that aspirin would have any benefit after 3 weeks of symptoms.
    4. Alternative diagnoses like gastritis are far more probable and aspirin would only serve to exacerbate the problem.
    5. We know nothing about OP, who may well have asthma which happens to worsen with aspirin.

    All in all, advising someone to take aspirin should come from a medical professional who has assessed OP properly.
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    (Original post by Etomidate)
    1. A heart attack in an 18 year old would be exceedingly rare.
    2. Even from the vague symptoms OP has described, it does not sound like a heart attack.
    3. Even if it was, it's unlikely that aspirin would have any benefit after 3 weeks of symptoms.
    4. Alternative diagnoses like gastritis are far more probable and aspirin would only serve to exacerbate the problem.
    5. We know nothing about OP, who may well have asthma which happens to worsen with aspirin.

    All in all, advising someone to take aspirin should come from a medical professional who has assessed OP properly.
    1/2. Yep, no doubt. Though it also has proven benefit for angina (again, of course unlikely) and PE (likelier, but still unlikely, though we don't have a full history). http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/.../e439.full.pdf Unfortunately, this: http://smchealth.org/sites/default/f...ain_Update.pdf is the best source I can find re aspirin in flu-like chest pain, but I can't find anything that suggests against it either.

    3. Probably not, but I'd say the risk of 75mg of aspirin (what most people will have) is pretty low, and it at least has a chance of helping.
    4. Gastritis? What makes you think that? That's not normally associated with chest pain, surely? Would flu (or similar) not fit better?
    5. I would hope people read the contraindications before taking medication (and I would imagine they would've been told they can't have aspirin when they got the asthma diagnosis).
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    (Original post by JoeTSR)
    1/2. Yep, no doubt. Though it also has proven benefit for angina (again, of course unlikely) and PE (likelier, but still unlikely, though we don't have a full history). http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/.../e439.full.pdf Unfortunately, this: http://smchealth.org/sites/default/f...ain_Update.pdf is the best source I can find re aspirin in flu-like chest pain, but I can't find anything that suggests against it either.

    3. Probably not, but I'd say the risk of 75mg of aspirin (what most people will have) is pretty low, and it at least has a chance of helping.
    4. Gastritis? What makes you think that? That's not normally associated with chest pain, surely? Would flu (or similar) not fit better?
    5. I would hope people read the contraindications before taking medication (and I would imagine they would've been told they can't have aspirin when they got the asthma diagnosis).
    Aspirin is used in some people with angina to reduce the long-term risk of full blown heart attack. This doesn't even vaguely sound like angina. Also you're advising "chewing it" which is typical of the treatment an acute event which is an entirely different dose. What are you trying to acheive here by advising a preventative dose of a drug administered via a treatment route for a disease that OP almost certainly doesn't have?

    The chances of it helping are so fantastically slim that they're negligible. The risks of aspirin are not.

    Aspirin is not used in the treatment of pulmonary embolism.

    Gastritis can be associated with chest pain, particularly if there is an element of GORD. It's actually pretty common.

    With point 5, you're making a lot of assumptions for an action that has zero benefit. You're doing more harm than good.
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    (Original post by JoeTSR)
    1/2. Yep, no doubt. Though it also has proven benefit for angina (again, of course unlikely) and PE (likelier, but still unlikely, though we don't have a full history). http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/.../e439.full.pdf Unfortunately, this: http://smchealth.org/sites/default/f...ain_Update.pdf is the best source I can find re aspirin in flu-like chest pain, but I can't find anything that suggests against it either.

    3. Probably not, but I'd say the risk of 75mg of aspirin (what most people will have) is pretty low, and it at least has a chance of helping.
    4. Gastritis? What makes you think that? That's not normally associated with chest pain, surely? Would flu (or similar) not fit better?
    5. I would hope people read the contraindications before taking medication (and I would imagine they would've been told they can't have aspirin when they got the asthma diagnosis).
    What qualifications are you basing your teatment of the OP on? You've just gone and instructed someone you've never met before whose medical and drug history you know nothing about to start a specific pharmacological intervention as treatment for some symptoms you've no confirmation of. While well intentioned, this isn't safe or sensible, we ask that people give general advice on here rather than specific medical advice.
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    (Original post by moonkatt)
    What qualifications are you basing your teatment of the OP on? You've just gone and instructed someone you've never met before whose medical and drug history you know nothing about to start a specific pharmacological intervention as treatment for some symptoms you've no confirmation of. While well intentioned, this isn't safe or sensible, we ask that people give general advice on here rather than specific medical advice.
    I wrote a post responding to etomidate, but I've deleted it. My SJA trainer instructed to play it safe and give aspirin for chest pain, but you're right, I shouldn't have said to do so without a history (or in general, on here). I apologise, and withdraw my statement.
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    (Original post by JoeTSR)
    I wrote a post responding to etomidate, but I've deleted it. My SJA trainer instructed to play it safe and give aspirin for chest pain, but you're right, I shouldn't have said to do so without a history. I apologise, and withdraw my statement.
    Thats OK, I get that you meant well by it. Wrt what your SJA trainer told you, I'd leave giving drugs like that to medically trained staff, in the end they have the training, accountability and most importantly are insured to do things like that, I don't know if as a first aider you'd be covered (I doubt you would) if a patient were to suffer ill effect from a medication you gave them.
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    (Original post by moonkatt)
    Thats OK, I get that you meant well by it. Wrt what your SJA trainer told you, I'd leave giving drugs like that to medically trained staff, in the end they have the training, accountability and most importantly are insured to do things like that, I don't know if as a first aider you'd be covered (I doubt you would) if a patient were to suffer ill effect from a medication you gave them.


    We're insured and allowed to dispense, as long as we identify ourselves as being from SJA and fill out a PRF (and follow training, obviously). The drug list isn't massive, it's ibuprofen, paracetamol, aspirin, loratadine, glucogel, dioralyte (and oxygen/entonox if trained), which we carry on duty. In regards to side effects and contraindications, in a purely hypothetical sense, the issues are pretty similar to ibuprofen, but I know you shouldn't even advise taking a paracetamol without a history.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    But what if the internet is right?
    You're not gonna know that until a Dr diagnoses you anyway. Why worry yourself? You can't diagnose or prescribe yourself so it's pointless.
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    Just to reassure you OP, I was having chest pains a d tightness for about 2 weeks and was panicking a bit like you are.... I went to see my GP and she said that my symptoms are acid reflux and severe anxiety. She took my blood pressure and listened to my heart and chest and said she is sure there is nothing serious wrong. I just need to take medication for four weeks for the acid reflux and go back if it doesn't improve

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