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Should The Death Penalty Be Allowed? watch

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    (Original post by Life_peer)
    Human rights organisations surely do enjoy flushing public money away… I'll let you figure out the rest.

    If we catch a terrorist right before the act, we should just put her against a wall and shoot her, not spend twenty years on trials.
    http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/costs-death-penalty

    From the report on the website above:

    Assessment of Costs by Judge Arthur Alarcon and Prof. Paula Mitchell (2011, updated 2012)The authors concluded that the cost of the death penalty in California has totaled over $4 billion since 1978 $1.94 billion--Pre-Trial and Trial Costs$925 million--Automatic Appeals and State Habeas Corpus Petitions$775 million--Federal Habeas Corpus Appeals$1 billion--Costs of IncarcerationThe authors calculated that, if the Governor commuted the sentences of those remaining on death row to life without parole, it would result in an immediate savings of $170 million per year, with a savings of $5 billion over the next 20 years.


    Also from the Guardian, same findings: http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...xecution-costs


    There we go, I think I just debunked your whole argument that the death penalty saves money. Now that settled, do you have any other flawed arguments?
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    (Original post by Life_peer)
    Human rights organisations surely do enjoy flushing public money away… I'll let you figure out the rest.

    If we catch a terrorist right before the act, we should just put her against a wall and shoot her, not spend twenty years on trials.
    I am so very glad we don't live in a country where this kind of thinking has a place in the legal system.
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    (Original post by Underscore__)
    What if they're being coerced? What if they have diminished responsibility? What if they're sleepwalking?


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    Coerced into orchestrating a bomb attack is still capital punishment in my books, diminished responsibility is just what every defence lawyer would say, and I hope sleepwalking is a joke.

    Some cases simply aren't complex and they could be resolved swiftly if it weren't for liberalism and bureaucracy that prevent justice. Everyone knew Al Capone was a crook making other people's lives miserable but no one could find anything to put him away (or down) for a long time. Why? Incapable justice. For the very same reasons, far too many people roam free nowadays.

    Believe in what you want to believe in, I'm not here to argue, just express my opinion.

    (Original post by Mr Hyde(r))
    http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/costs-death-penalty

    From the report on the website above:

    Assessment of Costs by Judge Arthur Alarcon and Prof. Paula Mitchell (2011, updated 2012)The authors concluded that the cost of the death penalty in California has totaled over $4 billion since 1978 $1.94 billion--Pre-Trial and Trial Costs$925 million--Automatic Appeals and State Habeas Corpus Petitions$775 million--Federal Habeas Corpus Appeals$1 billion--Costs of IncarcerationThe authors calculated that, if the Governor commuted the sentences of those remaining on death row to life without parole, it would result in an immediate savings of $170 million per year, with a savings of $5 billion over the next 20 years.


    Also from the Guardian, same findings: http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...xecution-costs

    There we go, I think I just debunked your whole argument that the death penalty saves money. Now that settled, do you have any other flawed arguments?
    Mister internet intellectual, you debunked nothing (it's the current cost, not the potential cost if done right) and it wasn't my entire argument either. Better luck next time!
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    (Original post by Life_peer)
    Mister internet intellectual, you debunked nothing (it's the current cost, not the potential cost if done right) and it wasn't my entire argument either. Better luck next time!
    What do you mean by potential cost if done right? The reports show how much the death penalty costs and that's how it is being run and they won't be changing it. I can make that argument for pretty much anything. It looks like you've dug yourself into a very deep hole and are coming up with very slippery slope arguments.
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    (Original post by Life_peer)
    Coerced into orchestrating a bomb attack is still capital punishment in my books, diminished responsibility is just what every defence lawyer would say, and I hope sleepwalking is a joke.

    Some cases simply aren't complex and they could be resolved swiftly if it weren't for liberalism and bureaucracy that prevent justice. Everyone knew Al Capone was a crook making other people's lives miserable but no one could find anything to put him away (or down) for a long time. Why? Incapable justice. For the very same reasons, far too many people roam free nowadays.
    Not everyone involved in a terrorist attack is an orchestrator. You're showing a blatant ignorance to legal process by saying diminished responsibility is just 'what every defence lawyer would say'. No sleepwalking isn't a joke, granted its highly unlikely but not impossible.

    No, some cases aren't complex but there still needs to be a trial. I think you'd be more at home in Saudi Arabia where a more relaxed approach is taken with regard to legal process






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    The death penalty should never be allowed. It's unsuited for civilized societies, mistakes can't be rectified after the procedure and statistics actually suggest that capital punishment doesn't act as a deterrent.
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    No. Executing a person only creates more grief and suffering. I can't understand why a victim's family would want another family to feel the same loss they have.


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    I think for things like Terrorism, but for murder sadly due to the failure rates no.
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    (Original post by Drummerz)
    Why not? its an apt punishment?, you replied my first question with a question but not an answer. Why then do I deserve the right to live?
    For me it's not the question of whether the criminal deserves to live, but does the state have the right to take a life? I don't believe it should.


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    No. But I think that we should make them to be used for medical trials.

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    (Original post by Moonstruck16)
    No. But I think that we should make them to be used for medical trials.

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    No a fan of human rights then?


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    (Original post by Underscore__)
    No a fan of human rights then?


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    It's got to the point where I care about animals more than I care about humans who are not friends/family etc. and who deserve punishment. Also, makes developing human target medicine easier.

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    (Original post by MockingJay-)
    What's your verdict? Is it right to kill someone for killing somebody?
    nope, just ship em off to the pacific garbage island. they can fend for themselves and clean the environment. its a win win if you ask me
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    (Original post by Moonstruck16)
    It's got to the point where I care about animals more than I care about humans who are not friends/family etc. and who deserve punishment. Also, makes developing human target medicine easier.

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    I'm not sure when people will get the message that countries that place more emphasis on rehabilitation have lower crime rates than those who emphasise 'punishment'


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    (Original post by Underscore__)
    I'm not sure when people will get the message that countries that place more emphasis on rehabilitation have lower crime rates than those who emphasise 'punishment'


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    Fine, call it rehabilitation through making yourself useful and helping the progress of medicine and decreasing the necessity for lab animals.

    Enforced volunteering is great for your CV and sll.

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    (Original post by Moonstruck16)
    Fine, call it rehabilitation through making yourself useful and helping the progress of medicine and decreasing the necessity for lab animals.

    Enforced volunteering is great for your CV and sll.

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    Thankfully the HRA would never allow such backward practices. I find it amazing how so many people criticise how backward countries like Saudi Arabia are, yet propose ideas too barbaric even for them.


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    (Original post by Underscore__)
    Thankfully the HRA would never allow such backward practices. I find it amazing how so many people criticise how backward countries like Saudi Arabia are, yet propose ideas too barbaric even for them.


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    Saudi Arabia don't want to save the animals. Anyway, I prefer to call it community service.

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    100% pro-death penalty.
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    (Original post by Moonstruck16)
    Saudi Arabia don't want to save the animals. Anyway, I prefer to call it community service.

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    What relevance does that have? It doesn't matter what you prefer to call it, it's torture


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    (Original post by MockingJay-)
    What's your verdict? Is it right to kill someone for killing somebody?
    Dying is the easy way out

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