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    (Original post by Kiytt)
    Do you think it's fair to classify everyone who doesn't see anything worth living for as depressed? Do you think they are somehow ignorant? Not that you do or have, just asking out of curiosity, having observed it myself.
    Hmmm...

    "Do you think it's fair to classify everyone who doesn't see anything worth living for as depressed?"

    When someone doesn't see anything worth living for... I would argue they are not automatically depressed. It can be a belief brought about by depression, but it can also be the result of experience and observations. From my current understanding of both, I would say they may often be found intertwined but are not necessarily synonymous.

    Feel free to debate me or share your own thoughts on this at your leisure! I'm always open to new ideas and discussions.

    "Do you think they are somehow ignorant?"

    Ignorant: "lacking knowledge or awareness in general; uneducated or unsophisticated." (Going by this definition)

    It would depend on the individual and whether they have world experience, or have thought about such matters deeply if at all. Some people may indeed be ignorant, but some may have rational arguments for their beliefs or attitudes that stem from thoughts or beliefs, that are well-rounded and thought out.

    What do you think, might I ask?
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    (Original post by Vennec)
    Hmmm...

    "Do you think it's fair to classify everyone who doesn't see anything worth living for as depressed?"

    When someone doesn't see anything worth living for... I would argue they are not automatically depressed. It can be a belief brought about by depression, but it can also be the result of experience and observations. From my current understanding of both, I would say they may often be found intertwined but are not necessarily synonymous.

    Feel free to debate me or share your own thoughts on this at your leisure! I'm always open to new ideas and discussions.

    "Do you think they are somehow ignorant?"

    Ignorant: "lacking knowledge or awareness in general; uneducated or unsophisticated." (Going by this definition)

    It would depend on the individual and whether they have world experience, or have thought about such matters deeply if at all. Some people may indeed be ignorant, but some may have rational arguments for their beliefs or attitudes that stem from thoughts or beliefs, that are well-rounded and thought out.

    What do you think, might I ask?
    No argument to be had there. I agree with every point.

    It's sad that I see so few share the same reasonable view as you do, that I feel obliged to thank you for being reasonable in your views. I've met countless people who paint all people who state life isn't worth living with the same brush—attempting to pseudo-diagnose without having a clue as to the reasons why they think that.

    I am of the opinion that life is not worth living for everyone. It should be assessed by the individual concerned, and not on a metric relative to everyone else's quality of life, but of their own. Sure, there are certain situations where this isn't as simple (like mentally incapacitated individuals), but generally this should apply.

    My doubts about life being worthwhile first arose from depression I had several years ago, but since then I've developed logical, philosophical reasons for why I believe it to be the case. The reasons are kinda long-winded, so I won't go into it now, but they're as logical as they can possibly be.

    I think everyone should have the right to die, should they want to. Of course, there's a bunch of ethical concerns regarding it, but those can all be traced back to the reason that we are biologically and socially conditioned to believe life should be preserved, regardless of circumstance.

    What we currently have is people free to live if they want to, but not to die if they wish to. Nobody is obliged to live, since nobody decides to live in the first place.

    Those are just my thoughts; if you want further clarification, feel free to ask.
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    (Original post by Kiytt)
    No argument to be had there. I agree with every point.

    It's sad that I see so few share the same reasonable view as you do, that I feel obliged to thank you for being reasonable in your views. I've met countless people who paint all people who state life isn't worth living with the same brush—attempting to pseudo-diagnose without having a clue as to the reasons why they think that.

    I am of the opinion that life is not worth living for everyone. It should be assessed by the individual concerned, and not on a metric relative to everyone else's quality of life, but of their own. Sure, there are certain situations where this isn't as simple (like mentally incapacitated individuals), but generally this should apply.

    My doubts about life being worthwhile first arose from depression I had several years ago, but since then I've developed logical, philosophical reasons for why I believe it to be the case. The reasons are kinda long-winded, so I won't go into it now, but they're as logical as they can possibly be.

    I think everyone should have the right to die, should they want to. Of course, there's a bunch of ethical concerns regarding it, but those can all be traced back to the reason that we are biologically and socially conditioned to believe life should be preserved, regardless of circumstance.

    What we currently have is people free to live if they want to, but not to die if they wish to. Nobody is obliged to live, since nobody decides to live in the first place.

    Those are just my thoughts; if you want further clarification, feel free to ask.
    People are very quick to judge, even if it is on something they don't understand, when they should, in my eyes, be quick to try and understand the other person first.

    You make sound and intriguing points. I cannot say I disagree with any of what you have said. Life is indeed not for everyone and we should have the right to choose how or when we die, granted there are ethical concerns present in such a situation. We do not choose to live and life is a continuous process.

    May I ask, what are your thoughts on antinatalism? (Are you aware of the concept?)
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    (Original post by Vennec)
    People are very quick to judge, even if it is on something they don't understand, when they should, in my eyes, be quick to try and understand the other person first.

    You make sound and intriguing points. I cannot say I disagree with any of what you have said. Life is indeed not for everyone and we should have the right to choose how or when we die, granted there are ethical concerns present in such a situation. We do not choose to live and life is a continuous process.

    May I ask, what are your thoughts on antinatalism? (Are you aware of the concept?)
    Interesting you ask that, since antinatalism is sort of what led me into the philosophical reasons for my nihilistic beliefs. I agree with the notion, and I'm particularly fond of David Benatar's arguments for it.

    I've never had a substantial desire to have children of my own, but I figure if hypothetically I were to later in life, I'd settle for adoption. I do not think it is moral to bargain on my future child not inheriting any of my deficient genes for one, and two, not encountering any severe psychological (or bodily) harm during their lifetime. I do resent parents who pass on such genes to their children so carelessly, and then seek sympathy for their child's predicament.

    Now, it probably seems inconsistent that I'm claiming life's not worth living yet I'm living and choosing to do things, or that I claim I'm a nihilist when clearly there are things I value.

    I confess I'm not a true nihilist; I believe everything is meaningless, save for the one pursuit of minimising suffering where possible—hence why I am postponing my suicide until I have severed all ties to family, friends, and anybody that knows me—or should that fail, to have written closure for those who care about me—and have a method which is almost, if not guaranteed to kill me. That minimises the suffering of others, even if it is generating suffering also.

    Though, I must make it clear that we do not have a duty to minimise suffering, but simply we should be morally inclined to. That inclination does not override autonomous decisions primarily affecting the self however, i.e. abortion, euthanasia.

    My beliefs might seem facetious, and in all honesty, I don't fully know them yet; but I do have a train of thought that approaches the direction I want it headed in, and I guess I'll just discover more about it at the stops along the way.
 
 
 
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