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Former international school kid, lived in 5 countries + firmed Warwick AMA watch

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    (Original post by MrDystopia)
    I'm envious, I love people with proficiency in multiple languages. Only got English and I'm trying to relearn my semi fluent Spanish now. After that I'd like to learn Japanese or Korean \o/
    Woah, how did you become semi-fluent in Spanish?

    Absolutely learn Japanese!!! It's one of the best languages hands down I recommend getting your hands on the 'Genki' series of language books, 'Remembering the Kanji', and look for the All Japanese All The Time blog online. All solid tools that have helped me a tonne with learning.

    (Ofc, watch as much anime and J-Drama as poss)

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    (Original post by Youngmetro)
    But you've literally been across the continent, like that is such a live childhood.

    btw, how has it affected your accent?
    True.. I guess it's weird because I'm sort of used to the idea of moving every few years and having my friends do the same..

    I have an 'American' base accent.

    Although, through living here in the UK I've picked up more of a 'posh' English accent when speaking to English folk and a more Scottish hinted accent speaking to my Scottish friends. I pretty much emulate the slang/accent of whomever I speak to.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    LOL I don't have one

    But so far, I've absolutely adored these:
    Tokyo Ghoul (ofc, Kaneki is a badass)
    Parasyte
    Your Lie in April
    No Game, No Life
    Psycho Pass
    Death Note
    Food Wars (love a bit of shokugeki )
    Angel Beats
    The World God Only Knows
    Another
    SAO
    Toradora

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    Excellent choices m8, what qualifications did you study at your international schools?
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    (Original post by Yammy)
    Excellent choices m8, what qualifications did you study at your international schools?
    Did the middle years IB programme for a bit. But after, I moved to a Scottish state school so did the usual stuff there.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Did the middle years IB programme for a bit. But after, I moved to a Scottish state school so did the usual stuff there.

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    I see, must have been a bit annoying changing education systems I guess lol
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    would you ever consider public service work?

    what causes mean the most to you? (i.e social mobility, cancer, homelessness) and other than donate, what would you do to help tackle the issue?

    why an industry coverage group (TMT) as opposed to pure product?

    what are your overarching thoughts on institutionalised education?
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    But after, I moved to a Scottish state school so did the usual stuff there.
    How did this compare to other schools you've been in, and, more generally, which education system that you've been in did you think was best, and why?

    What's the most interesting/unusual cultural convention/habit you've come across anywhere you've lived?
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    (Original post by gr8wizard10)
    would you ever consider public service work?

    what causes mean the most to you? (i.e social mobility, cancer, homelessness) and other than donate, what would you do to help tackle the issue?

    why an industry coverage group (TMT) as opposed to pure product?

    what are your overarching thoughts on institutionalised education?
    1. Only in the capacity where I either a) get to represent my country and build relations with other countries or b) utilise hard skills like mathematics/programming to prevent national threats as a crypto specialist. The first would be either as a diplomat, or (ideally) an ambassador. I guess my long term goal is to generate enough capital such that I can make a de facto NGO which would be tasked with investing in developing nations; which in itself is a form of diplomacy. The second, I don't think I'd be smart enough to achieve.

    2. Fair access to education, accurate careers guidance, cancer (my dad died of cancer), infrastructure, access to the internet, and basic human rights. I try to donate to Cancer Research UK every year, and I regularly set up fundraising events for various other charities - namely British Heart, Scottish Motor Neurone, Save the Children etc.

    Tying into my previous answer, I'd love to amass enough wealth to start my own scholarship fund, and an NGO esque foundation tasked with investing into developing countries' infrastructure as well as providing supplement funds to underfunded UK schools. It'd be pretty awesome to actually make an impact rather than donate passively to organisations that don't effectively make use of the donation money.

    3. I love, love, love tech. It's exciting to look through the financials of a tech company because I can really envision how that company's goals, vision and growth plans align with where they are at the moment.

    Even cooler is when you have pre-revenue companies where in place of regular metrics (EBITDA, EV, P/E etc) you can come up with some wacky growth measures like monthly active users to lifetime value per user.

    I also think that TMT as a whole is more 'sexy', most of the deals taking place in that space will fully impact the lives of most young (and slightly older) people. As for coverage vs product, I'd prefer to keep things as varied as possible. Only working in M&A, or ECM or DCM would probably get a bit monotonous whereas coverage teams touch across all aspects of I-banking.

    4. I think the way we set out education at the moment is flawed. We're effectively setting young people on treadmills towards constant low hanging fruits/incentives (grades) in the hope that they adhere to the rules - ending up in some pre-assigned section of the economic machine. A better move would be to allow more exploration throughout the teenage years. Implementing a curriculum where kids actually go out into the real world for a few months at a time to apply the knowledge they've learnt in school - that would be awesome.

    Overall, at least here in the UK, we're too focused on early specialisation. We put so much pressure on high potential kids to get the 'right' grades, so they can go to the 'right' uni to stand a chance at the 'right' kind of career. Where's the independent curiosity? Where's the encouragement for nonconformist routes? Where's the championing of entrepreneurship? Not in the average secondary school that's for sure. Even still, education is POWERFUL, not because it boosts our prospects but because it opens our minds. People can begin to question the world, their model of how they were brought up to understand things. Most of all, people have the toolkit to THINK.

    I believe that's what we're missing, encouraging free thought and intellectual exploration.

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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    How did this compare to other schools you've been in, and, more generally, which education system that you've been in did you think was best, and why?

    What's the most interesting/unusual cultural convention/habit you've come across anywhere you've lived?
    1.

    Classmates:
    At the international schools kids were from all across the globe, varying cultures and backgrounds but the one thing we all sort of had in common was socioeconomic status (at least at the time). Sure it was a physically diverse bunch but we had the classical middle class/upper middle class striver mentality instilled into us. Our parents pushed us to do well academically, to get involved outside of school to pursue hobbies that interested us as they themselves were successful in getting professional jobs via working their asses off.

    As a result no one, and I literally mean no-bo-dy misbehaved in class. If you did, you would get a *******ing from your fellow classmates wanting to learn before the teacher even said a word. What you had was a bunch of self starters that took their education seriously - both in class and out on the field or in the rehearsal rooms or on stage.

    vs

    At my state school, people were from quite the plethora of socioeconomic backgrounds. That said I'd peg the average as being skewed towards more of a lower middle class bunch overall. Now of course, these kids were rarely from super professional backgrounds - most of their parents didn't really care how much effort they put in, and often it was explicitly stated that they would prefer their kids working than studying. Classes were ALWAYS disrupted between the ages of 13-16. When this happened everyone else took it as an opportunity to join in rather than take matters up with the people causing havoc.

    Cue Standard Grades (GCSE equiv) and c.50-60% of the class left to go on to college or work or an apprenticeship. What was a rowdy, constantly unappealing environment to be in (at least within my year) became slightly more serious. The people who stayed on to get their highers were committed to doing well, and generally had somewhat vague ideas of where they wanted to be.

    The issue, again, was that due to the prior environment nobody had the work ethic to achieve highly except for a select few. Homework was often handed in late, people rarely revised for upcoming tests and when final exams came around not a single soul was prepared (due to the culture of laziness), thus only 21/120 people actually passed 4 or more Highers.

    As for ECs and such, it was again only a very small subsection of the school who partook in these. To be fair, my school was musically/rhythmically bent so we did have fairly strong numbers in things like choir, orchestra and dance teams but outside of that there was barely any engagement.

    Teachers

    At the international schools teachers were drawn from all across the board. Many with PhDs, Masters etc, and all had the same enthusiastic approach to teaching that continued to inspire students. We'd be stretched to do e.g. research projects about the viability of landing on Mars, when we were only 8 years old. Or we'd do a dissection on a real cow heart to learn about anatomy at 11-12 years old. All because the teachers knew we had to be challenged in order for us to learn. I think we were more 'inspired' than 'lectured at' by the teachers.

    vs

    At the state school, teachers diverted the majority of their attention onto problem children. When a class became rowdy, you'd know you wouldn't be learning anything meaningful for the rest of that class. Another aspect was the overall variance in quality amongst teachers was massive. You'd have people sit on their desks, talk at a boring monotonous pace at you whilst going on long tangents about their personal lives but you'd also have some truly engaging teachers whom prepare thoroughly prior to coming into class ensuring the material was both interactive and relevant.

    I felt like the state school put too much emphasis on punishment systems, disincentives and rules/regulations on what we could and couldn't do.

    Resources, Environment and Enrichment

    This really isn't a contest... At my international schools we'd have yearly adventure trips to various camps around the world. It was a solid week of teambuilding, adrenaline filled activities (i.e. white water rafting, gorge walking etc); I think the purpose of it was to instill in us a 'be bold' spirit. Meaning tackling challenges was going to be a crucial part of life so why not expose us to a few of these said challenges every year? On top of that, we'd have field trips to historical sites to put background behind the concepts we'd learn at school.

    Resources were top notch. Never was there a moment I couldn't get a book, or a piece of work for a project, or a grant to do some outside research etc

    vs

    There were a few of such adventure trips but only reserved for 1-2 year groups and generally in less appealing locations.

    Resources were alright but not stellar. I did find it hard to get materials, or funds to get projects done.


    2.

    I'd say.. Some of my classmates (especially europeans) always kissed on the cheek when we greeted each other.

    But, that's not really unusual..

    Hmm

    Ah! Sinterklaas! Basically the Dutch version of santa clause. We used to have these weird dressed up guys, usually with faces painted in black/brown who would proceed to throw candy at us. They would like disrupt the class and start making a fool of themselves ahah.


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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    .
    Interesting stuff. Re the schools, I guess that's mostly what you'd expect in any state vs private school comparison. I guess it's also what you would have expected before moving into the state sector anyway.
 
 
 
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