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    (Original post by imaninja)
    Okay yh I'm not making any sense, maaf karo.
    Maaf kiya :lol:
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    I had a dream the man in the sky. I looked upon his magnificence as he rested on his throne, his back to me. In a thunderous voice he inquired "why is it that you have come so far to my abode?" "I only wish to look upon you, my Lord" I replied, feeling small and insignificant in his shadow. "Very well then!" he growled, "In return for my granting your wish, you shall return home and spread the message that it is I alone who is worthy of worship".

    His throne began to turn towards me, I wrang my hands in anticipation, my heart pounding like the hooves of wild horse. A cloud moved towards him, blocking the blinding sunlight which had been obscuring my vision. Behold.....it was the flying spaghetti monster.

    Since then I have converted and am a devout worshipper. He is the one true god.
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    (Original post by rajneetk)
    Really?? Omg that's so cool I never knew Hindus have different beliefs!!
    I've never looked into Hinduism properly then
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    True but it was scary. I was hugging my folder for comfort it's scary ngl
    It was snowing earlier! This weather is weird
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    Yes indeed the weather is weird
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    (Original post by TheALevelStudent)
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    Yes indeed the weather is weird
    I'd like to be a Hindu
    Seems less dogmatic
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    (Original post by rajneetk)
    I'd like to be a Hindu
    Seems less dogmatic
    cool
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    (Original post by rajneetk)
    I'd like to be a Hindu
    Seems less dogmatic
    No need.
    Stick to Sikhi (yep a Hindu is saying that to you)
    :lol:
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    (Original post by TheALevelStudent)
    cool
    Hinduism may have dated back to the prehistoric
    Concepts of Sikhism and Hinduism are very similar - Brahman is in everyone, reincarnation, moksha - become one with God and burning the dead not burying. Just searched this up now.
    So cool!
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    (Original post by nucdev)
    No need.
    Stick to Sikhi (yep a Hindu is saying that to you)
    :lol:
    Researching Hinduism...I never even knew the basics.
    Pretty interesting.
    Lmao I'm happy as a Sikh
    I think Kharku might give me the silent treatment. He is a "gggrrr" type anyway.
    ROFL
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    (Original post by rajneetk)
    Hinduism may have dated back to the prehistoric
    Concepts of Sikhism and Hinduism are very similar - Brahman is in everyone, reincarnation, moksha - become one with God and burning the dead not burying. Just searched this up now.
    So cool!
    A lot of similarities, but also a lot of differences.

    Go with whatever you prefer.
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    (Original post by rajneetk)
    Researching Hinduism...I never even knew the basics.
    Pretty interesting.
    Lmao I'm happy as a Sikh
    I think Kharku might give me the silent treatment. He is a "gggrrr" type anyway.
    ROFL
    Haha dw most Hindus themselves don't know the basics! :lol:

    Exactly research by all means, but if you're happy with Sikhi, there's no need to change. It's not as if we're going to threaten you with eternal torture and being roasted on satan's barbecue in hell
    :rofl::rofl::rofl:

    Ask more on the Hindu Soc if you need to: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=196294
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    (Original post by TheALevelStudent)
    A lot of similarities, but also a lot of differences.

    Go with whatever you prefer.
    What are the differences?
    I like both
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    It is the custom to go down on one knee and make the sign of the cross before sitting down in church. Usually done at the end of the row where you are about to sit.

    A friend of my mum's once did this at the cinema.
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    (Original post by rajneetk)
    What are the differences?
    I like both
    There's loads lol, that's why Sikhism is an entirely separate religon
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    (Original post by nucdev)
    Haha dw most Hindus themselves don't know the basics! :lol:

    Exactly research by all means, but if you're happy with Sikhi, there's no need to change. It's not as if we're going to threaten you with eternal torture and being roasted on satan's barbecue in hell
    :rofl::rofl::rofl:

    Ask more on the Hindu Soc if you need to: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=196294
    omg I lost it at that Lmao
    Thanks Nucdev!
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    (Original post by TheALevelStudent)
    There's loads lol, that's why Sikhism is an entirely separate religon
    EditSikhism is a monotheistic religion; Sikhs believe there is only one God, who has infinite qualities and names. Hinduism is a diverse system of thought with beliefs spanning monotheism, polytheism, panentheism, pantheism, monism, agnosticism, deism and atheism.[24]Rituals EditSikhs do not believe in rituals, and believe that only meditation on the naam (name) of Waheguru is appropriate. Different schools of Hinduism have different theories about rituals[25][26] and on salvation (moksha).[27]Idol worship EditMain article: Idolatry in SikhismSikhs reject idol worship.[28] Hindus accept the worship facilitated with images or murtis (idols), particularly in Agamic traditions, such as Vaishnavism and Shaivism.[29] Some scholars state it is incorrect to state that all Hindus worship idols, and more correct to state that for some the idol is a means to focus their thoughts, for some idol is a manifestation of spirituality that is everywhere, and for some even a linga, a sunrise or a river or a flower serves the same purpose.[30][31] Both Hindus and Sikhs have temples.Soteriology EditThe Sikh concept of salvation is similar to some schools of Hinduism, and it is called mukti (moksha) referring to spiritual liberation.[32] It is described in Sikhism as the state that breaks the cycle of rebirths.[32] Mukti is obtained according to Sikhism, states Singha, through "God's grace".[33] In the teachings of the Sikh scripture Guru Granth Sahib, the devotion to God is viewed as more important than the desire for Mukti.[33]I desire neither worldly power nor liberation. I desire nothing but seeing the Lord.Brahma, Shiva, the Siddhas, the silent sages and Indra - I seek only the Blessed Vision of my Lord and Master's Darshan.I have come, helpless, to Your Door, O Lord Master; I am exhausted - I seek the Sanctuary of the Saints.Says Nanak, I have met my Enticing Lord God; my mind is cooled and soothed - it blossoms forth in joy.— Guru Granth Sahib, P534[33][34]Sikhism recommends Naam Simran as the way to mukti, which is meditating and repeating the Naam (names of God).[32][33]The six major orthodox schools of Hindu philosophy offer diverse soteriological views on moksha, including whether moksha can be achieved in this life, or after this life.[35] The Nyaya, Vaisesika and Mimamsa schools of Hinduism consider moksha as possible only after death.[35][36] Samkhya and Yoga schools consider moksha as possible in this life. In Vedanta school, the Advaita sub-school concludes moksha is possible in this life.[35] The Dvaita and Visistadvaita sub-schools of Vedanta tradition, highlighted by many poet-siants of the Bhakti movement, believe that moksha is a continuous event, one assisted by loving devotion to God, that extends from this life to post-mortem. Beyond these six orthodox schools, some heterodox schools of Hindu tradition, such as Carvaka, deny there is a soul or after life moksha.[37]Dietary requirements EditHinduism does not explicitly prohibit eating meat, but it does strongly recommend Ahimsa – the concept of non-violence against all life forms including animals.[38][39] As a consequence, many Hindus prefer vegetarian or lacto-vegetarian lifestyle, and methods of food production that is in harmony with nature and compassionate, respectful of other life forms as well as nature.[38]The tenets of Sikhism do not advocate a particular stance on either vegetarianism[40] or the consumption of meat,[40][41] but rather leave the decision of diet to the individual. Sikh sects and groups that have a "Vashnavite" influence (AKJ, GNNSJ, 3HO, Namdhari's etc.) tend to be vegetarians.[40][41] Other Sikhs eat meat that has been prepared by the Jhatka method (meat prepared by sudden death of the animal), and consider only that meat as expressly forbidden that is ritualy slaughtered like Kosher or Halal (Kutha meat, the meat of animals prepared by slowly bleeding it to death). Sikhs Singha explains the Jhatka meat requirement to have origins in the Hindu tradition, as follows,According to the ancient Aryan Hindu tradition, only such meat as is obtained from an animal which is killed with one stroke of the weapon causing instantaneous death is fit for human consumption. However, with the coming of Islam into India and the Muslim political hegemony, it became a state policy not to permit slaughter of animals for food, in any other manner, except as laid down in the Quran - the kosher meat prepared by slowly severing the main blood artery of the throat of the animal while reciting verses from the Quran. It is done to make slaughter a sacrifice to God and to expiate the sins of the slaughter. Guru Gobind Singh took a rather serious view of this aspect of the whole matter. He, therefore, while permitting flesh to be taken as food repudiated the whole theory of this expiatory sacrifice and the right of ruling Muslims to impose it on the non-Muslims. Accordingly, he made jhatka meat obligatory for those Sikhs who may be interested in taking meat as a part of their food.— HS Singha, Sikhism, A Complete Introduction[42]

    Wikipedia couldn't find another site
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    (Original post by rajneetk)
    x
    Did you have to paste the whole Wiki page? :facepalm:

    :rofl:
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    (Original post by nucdev)
    Did you have to paste the whole Wiki page? :facepalm:

    :rofl:
    Lmao
    Interesting to read though.
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    (Original post by rajneetk)
    EditSikhism is a monotheistic religion; Sikhs believe there is only one God, who has infinite qualities and names. Hinduism is a diverse system of thought with beliefs spanning monotheism, polytheism, panentheism, pantheism, monism, agnosticism, deism and atheism.[24]Rituals EditSikhs do not believe in rituals, and believe that only meditation on the naam (name) of Waheguru is appropriate. Different schools of Hinduism have different theories about rituals[25][26] and on salvation (moksha).[27]Idol worship EditMain article: Idolatry in SikhismSikhs reject idol worship.[28] Hindus accept the worship facilitated with images or murtis (idols), particularly in Agamic traditions, such as Vaishnavism and Shaivism.[29] Some scholars state it is incorrect to state that all Hindus worship idols, and more correct to state that for some the idol is a means to focus their thoughts, for some idol is a manifestation of spirituality that is everywhere, and for some even a linga, a sunrise or a river or a flower serves the same purpose.[30][31] Both Hindus and Sikhs have temples.Soteriology EditThe Sikh concept of salvation is similar to some schools of Hinduism, and it is called mukti (moksha) referring to spiritual liberation.[32] It is described in Sikhism as the state that breaks the cycle of rebirths.[32] Mukti is obtained according to Sikhism, states Singha, through "God's grace".[33] In the teachings of the Sikh scripture Guru Granth Sahib, the devotion to God is viewed as more important than the desire for Mukti.[33]I desire neither worldly power nor liberation. I desire nothing but seeing the Lord.Brahma, Shiva, the Siddhas, the silent sages and Indra - I seek only the Blessed Vision of my Lord and Master's Darshan.I have come, helpless, to Your Door, O Lord Master; I am exhausted - I seek the Sanctuary of the Saints.Says Nanak, I have met my Enticing Lord God; my mind is cooled and soothed - it blossoms forth in joy.— Guru Granth Sahib, P534[33][34]Sikhism recommends Naam Simran as the way to mukti, which is meditating and repeating the Naam (names of God).[32][33]The six major orthodox schools of Hindu philosophy offer diverse soteriological views on moksha, including whether moksha can be achieved in this life, or after this life.[35] The Nyaya, Vaisesika and Mimamsa schools of Hinduism consider moksha as possible only after death.[35][36] Samkhya and Yoga schools consider moksha as possible in this life. In Vedanta school, the Advaita sub-school concludes moksha is possible in this life.[35] The Dvaita and Visistadvaita sub-schools of Vedanta tradition, highlighted by many poet-siants of the Bhakti movement, believe that moksha is a continuous event, one assisted by loving devotion to God, that extends from this life to post-mortem. Beyond these six orthodox schools, some heterodox schools of Hindu tradition, such as Carvaka, deny there is a soul or after life moksha.[37]Dietary requirements EditHinduism does not explicitly prohibit eating meat, but it does strongly recommend Ahimsa – the concept of non-violence against all life forms including animals.[38][39] As a consequence, many Hindus prefer vegetarian or lacto-vegetarian lifestyle, and methods of food production that is in harmony with nature and compassionate, respectful of other life forms as well as nature.[38]The tenets of Sikhism do not advocate a particular stance on either vegetarianism[40] or the consumption of meat,[40][41] but rather leave the decision of diet to the individual. Sikh sects and groups that have a "Vashnavite" influence (AKJ, GNNSJ, 3HO, Namdhari's etc.) tend to be vegetarians.[40][41] Other Sikhs eat meat that has been prepared by the Jhatka method (meat prepared by sudden death of the animal), and consider only that meat as expressly forbidden that is ritualy slaughtered like Kosher or Halal (Kutha meat, the meat of animals prepared by slowly bleeding it to death). Sikhs Singha explains the Jhatka meat requirement to have origins in the Hindu tradition, as follows,According to the ancient Aryan Hindu tradition, only such meat as is obtained from an animal which is killed with one stroke of the weapon causing instantaneous death is fit for human consumption. However, with the coming of Islam into India and the Muslim political hegemony, it became a state policy not to permit slaughter of animals for food, in any other manner, except as laid down in the Quran - the kosher meat prepared by slowly severing the main blood artery of the throat of the animal while reciting verses from the Quran. It is done to make slaughter a sacrifice to God and to expiate the sins of the slaughter. Guru Gobind Singh took a rather serious view of this aspect of the whole matter. He, therefore, while permitting flesh to be taken as food repudiated the whole theory of this expiatory sacrifice and the right of ruling Muslims to impose it on the non-Muslims. Accordingly, he made jhatka meat obligatory for those Sikhs who may be interested in taking meat as a part of their food.— HS Singha, Sikhism, A Complete Introduction[42]
    (Original post by rajneetk)
    Wikipedia couldn't find another site
    Yeah they are some of the basic and simple differences
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    (Original post by TheALevelStudent)
    [spoiler]

    Yeah they are some of the basic and simple differences

    So what are the descriptive differences? :eyeball:


    :adore:
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    (Original post by rajneetk)
    So what are the descriptive differences? :eyeball:


    :adore:
    To know that one must have a deeper understanding of the core beleifs for both faiths. Having different physical practices is significant, but the inner spiritual beleifs which cause these physical practices is where the real differences lye.
 
 
 
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